Cyber bullying: Who, What, Where
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Cyber bullying: Who, What, Where

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Workshop given at the annual PR TESOL Convention in San Juan, Puerto Rico, November, 2011

Workshop given at the annual PR TESOL Convention in San Juan, Puerto Rico, November, 2011

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  • Every parent wants the best for their children and will go above and beyond to keep them safe. It’s a terrible feeling when a parent isn’t able to stop pain and/or suffering from entering a child’s life from any source. A big problem with todays youth seems to be bullying. Parents of kids who are involved in a bullying situation should make sure their kids know that they are always willing to listen to their concerns.As a way of helping everyone especially the parents, who find it quite hard to manage time, I found this great Safety Service which featured a safety app which gets me connected to a Safety Network or escalate my call to the nearest 911 when needed, it has other cool features that are helpful for your kids with just a press of a Panic Button. #SafekidZone, Check it here: http://bit.ly/ZjYchC
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  • 1. Cyber Bullying:Who, What, When? Prof. Mary Moore de ReecePuerto Rico TESOL Convention November 18, 2011 San Juan, Puerto Rico
  • 2. WHAT ??Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 2 18, 2011
  • 3. CYBER BULLYING IS…• The electronic posting of mean-spirited messages about a person (as a student) often done anonymously. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 3 18, 2011
  • 4. CYBER BULLYING IS…con.• An individual or group that uses information and communication involving electronic technologies to facilitate deliberate and repeated harassment or threat to an individual or group.• Also known as:  ‘Electronic Bullying’  ‘Online Social Cruelty’ Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 4 18, 2011
  • 5. WHERE ??Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 5 18, 2011
  • 6. Cyber Bullies’ Technology• E-mail• Cell phones• Text messages• Instant messaging• Chat rooms• Facebook Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 6 18, 2011
  • 7. Cyber Bullies’ Technology—con.• Uses technology BOTH within the school environment and off-campus. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 7 18, 2011
  • 8. Three Types of Bullying Physical Verbal Relationship Bullying Bullying BullyingHitting, Kicking, Name calling Refusing to talk or Pushing to someone someone Stealing, Hiding Teasing Spreading lies or ruining and rumorssomeones things about someoneMaking someone Insulting Making someonedo something he feel left out , or she doesnt rejected or want to do threatened Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 8 18, 2011
  • 9. CYBER BULLY CATEGORIES• “Inadvertent” – Role-play – Responding – May not realize it’s cyber bullying• “Vengeful Angel” – Righting wrongs – Protecting themselves• “Mean Girls” – Bored; Entertainment – Ego based; promote own social status – Often do in a group Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 9 18, 2011
  • 10. CYBER BULLY CATEGORIES—con. – Intimidate on and off line – Need others to bully; if isolated, they stop• “Power-Hungry” – Want reaction – Controlling with fear• “Revenge of the Nerds”• (“Subset of Power-Hungry”) – Often Victims of school-yard bullies – Throw ‘cyber-weight’ around – Not school-yard bullies like Power-Hungry & Mean Girls Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 10 18, 2011
  • 11. WHO ??Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 11 18, 2011
  • 12. BULLIESPuerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 12 18, 2011
  • 13. All bullies have one thing in common• Something or someone is making them feel insecure. Therefore they bully to make themselves feel better. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 13 18, 2011
  • 14. All bullies have one thing in common-con. • They could have something going on in their family. • They might not feel like they are getting enough attention from parents or teachers. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 14 18, 2011
  • 15. All bullies have one thing in common-con. • They might have watched their parents or older siblings get their way by being angry and pushy. • Maybe they are also bullied. • They might be spoiled by their parents. • The vast majority of cyber bullies are GIRLS Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 15 18, 2011
  • 16. TARGETSPuerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 16 18, 2011
  • 17. Targets of Bullies• The bullies or the targets are either smaller or bigger than most kids their age.• The target may be a minority.• May have a disability.• Maybe have a name that is not ordinary. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 17 18, 2011
  • 18. Targets of Bullies--continued•If they get anxious or upset easily.•If they are usually are alone and dont have many friends.•If they dont have a lot of confidence and dont stand up for themselves. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 18 18, 2011
  • 19. Some frightening statistics Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 19 18, 2011
  • 20. CYBER BULLYING PREVALENCE• The i-SAFE America research team has discovered a disturbing trend—cyber bullying has affected more than half the students surveyed, on both sides of the issue.• Their latest assessments surveyed more than 1500 students ranging from fourth to eighth grade across the country. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 20 18, 2011
  • 21. CYBER BULLYING PREVALENCE—con. They found out: (2010)• 58% of kids admit someone has said mean or hurtful things to them online• 53% of kids admit having said something mean or hurtful things to another online• 42% of kids have been bullied while online Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 21 18, 2011
  • 22. More startling facts:•The tradition of home as a refuge from bullies on the school playground is over!•The Internet is the new playground, and there are no “off hours”.•The popularity of instant messaging, e-mail, webpages, and blogging means kids are a target 24 hours per day, seven days a week. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 22 18, 2011
  • 23. More startling facts: con.•Even worse, i-SAFE found out 58 % of kidshave not told their parents or any adult aboutsomething mean or hurtful that had happenedto them online! Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 23 18, 2011
  • 24. So, our question today is:“What can schools and teachers do?” Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 24 18, 2011
  • 25. Teachers and School OfficialsTeachers and school officials need to beaware of the rising trend of cyber bullyingas incidents online are brought ontoschool grounds. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 25 18, 2011
  • 26. Teachers and School Officials-con. What can schools do?•Assess the level of cyberbullying in theschool (recognize it IS a problem)•Develop clear policies•Provide staff training•Create awareness for teachers, parents, community and students. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 26 18, 2011
  • 27. Teachers and School Officials-con. What can schools do?•Engage students in the creation,dissemination, and application of a policyfor acceptable use of the school’sinformation technology resources. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 27 18, 2011
  • 28. Teachers and School Officials-con. What can schools do?—continued•Educate students on how to avoidcyberbullying and how to respond to andreport cyberbullies.•Provide professional developmentopportunities for staff and teachers oncyberbullying. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 28 18, 2011
  • 29. Teachers and School Officials-con. What can schools do?—continued•Determine how the school’s efforts can becoordinated with those of the community(are there any in Puerto Rico?)•Educate parents about cyberbullying.•Train and utilize student mentors. Peersoften have more legitimacy than theteacher. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 29 18, 2011
  • 30. Teacher Involvement•“Only 25% of students report that teachersintervene in bullying situations, while 71%of teachers believe they always intervene.”•Teachers not only must respondimmediately to instances of bullying, butmust support students who report bullying.•Educators are obliged to take actionimmediately if bullying occurs through aschool’s Internet system! Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 30 18, 2011
  • 31. Teacher Involvement—con.•Notify parents of both known andsuspected cyber bullying•Notify police if cyber bullying in yourschool involves a threat•Watch victims of cyber bullying for possibleretaliation (aggressor actions) Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 31 18, 2011
  • 32. Teacher Involvement—con.•Teach students online “netiquette”, safe useof social media, and how to monitor theironline reputation•Have ongoing talks with all students aboutthe potentially devastating outcomes ofcyber bullying•Respond immediately to students whoappear to need counseling•Give encouragement to your studentmentors Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 32 18, 2011
  • 33. So, what do you tell your students? Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 33 18, 2011
  • 34. Prevention Techniques Don’t give out private information such as passwords, pins, name, address, ph one number, school name, or family and friends’ names. This information can be used by bullies and other harmful people on the Internet. Don’t even reveal your password to your friends. They might reveal it or use it against you in a fight. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 34 18, 2011
  • 35. Prevention Techniques—con. Don’t exchange pictures or give out e- mail addresses to people you meet on the Internet. Ask permission from parents when it is necessary to give such information. Don’t send a message when you are angry—it’s hard to undo things that are said in anger. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 35 18, 2011
  • 36. Prevention Techniques—conDelete messages from people you don’t know, or those from people who seem angry or mean.When something doesn’t seem right, it probably isn’t. Get out of the site, chat, etc.Realize that online conversations are not private. Others can copy, print, and share what you say or any pictures you send. Be careful! Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 36 18, 2011
  • 37. What if we do nothing? Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 37 18, 2011
  • 38. THE BUREAU OF JUSTICE SCHOOL BULLYINGSTATISTICS AND CYBER BULLYING STATISTICS – School Crime and Safety:• 46% of males, and 26% of females reported they had been in physical fights according to the school bullying statistics.• The school bullying statistics and cyber bullying statistics indicated that those in the lower grades reported being in twice as many fights as those in the higher grades. However, there is a lower rate of serious violent crimes in the elementary level than in the middle or high schools. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 38 18, 2011
  • 39. The school bullying statistics and cyber bullyingstatistics went on to say that teenagers sayrevenge is the strongest motivation for schoolshootings — 87% said shootings are motivated by a desire to “get back at those who have hurt them.” — 86% said, “other kids picking on them, making fun of them or bullying them” causes teenagers to turn to lethal violence in the schools. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 39 18, 2011
  • 40. Students recognize that being a victim of abuseat home or witnessing others being abused athome may cause violence in school accordingto recent school bullying statistics and cyberbullying statistics. — 61% said students shoot others because they have been victims of physical abuse at home. — 54% said witnessing physical abuse at home can lead to violence in school. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 40 18, 2011
  • 41. The school bullying statistics andcyber bullying statistics showed thatstudents say their schools are notsafe. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 41 18, 2011
  • 42. What about the effects on you, the teacher?•It can be very harmful to teachers and othermembers of the school workforce:  Undermining your confidence, self-esteem and sense of security Affecting your performance and attendance at school Causing stress and affecting your health Affecting your professional reputation and career Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 42 18, 2011
  • 43. What about the effects on you, the teacher? Marginalizing certain groups Fuelling prejudice in areas such as race, religion and sexuality Leading to suicidal thoughts Affecting you for the rest of your life Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 43 18, 2011
  • 44. What does the Puerto Rico law say?Puerto Rico General Education Council Act of 1999,” amends Section 16- Evaluation of schools- The licensing and accreditation process must include a verification of the schools bullying laws, cyberbullying is not specifically included in the definition of bullying.In 2008 “The Organic Act of the Department of Education of Puerto Rico” amended Section 3.08, 3.08a, 3.08b, 3.08c, 3.08d, and 3.08e of Chapter III of Act No. 149 of 1999- requires school boards to adopt comprehensive bullying policies. It is unclear if cyberbullying is included in the bullying definitions. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 44 18, 2011
  • 45. What does the Puerto Rico law say?P.R. Laws Ann. Tit. 33, § 4013- Defines stalking and intimidation, cyberbullying is included.P.R. Laws Ann. Tit. 33, § 4014- Delinquent conduct statute that criminally penalizes stalking and intimidation, cyberbullying is included. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 45 18, 2011
  • 46. So, let’s protect our students AND ourselves! Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 46 18, 2011
  • 47. One Last Thought Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 47 18, 2011
  • 48. References•http://blog.zonealarm,com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/110216-ZA-BULLY.png.Accessesd, August 10, 2011•http://csriu.org.accessed. Accessed, September 26, 2011•http://cyberbullying.org. Accessed, July 28, 2011•http://cyber-safe-kids.com. Accessed, August 14, 2011•http://www.how-to-stop-bullying.com/bullyingstatistics.html.Accessed October9, 2011.•http://www.ncsl.org/default.aspx?tabid=20753. Accessed November 7, 2011.•http://www.promoteprevnt.org/publications/prevention-beliefs/preventing-cyberbullying-schools-and-communjity.. Accessed, October 12, 2011.•Illinois Child Welfare. Volume 3, Numbers 1 and 2, 2006-2007. Accessed, August25, 2011. Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 48 18, 2011
  • 49. Thanks for your attention. Any questions? Puerto Rico TESOL Convention, November 49 18, 2011