American Lit 2010-01
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  • Elementary Reading Reading readiness Word mastery Vocabulary growth and the use of context Eighth grade literacy Inspectional Reading Systematic Skimming or Pre-reading This applies to a longer work. Look at the title page and, if the book has one, at its preface Study the table of contents Check the index Read the publisher’s blurb Look at the chapters that seem pivotal to its argument Turn the pages, dipping in here and there, reading a paragraph or two, sometimes several pages in sequence, never more than that. Superficial Reading This applies to a longer work -- and to essays, stories, poems, or plays. Read it through without ever stopping to ponder the things you do not understand right away. What you understand by reading the book through to the end – even if it is only fifty percent or less –helps you when you go back to the places you passed by on your first reading Analytical Reading This applies to a single work – and to essays, stories, poems or plays. Questions to Ask What is the work about as a whole? What is being said in detail, and how? Is the work true, in whole or in part? What of it? Analytical Reading – 1 st Stage Know what kind of work you are reading. Know this as early as possible, preferably before you begin to read. State the unity of the whole work in a single sentence, or a short paragraph. Set forth the major parts of the work, and show how these are organized into a whole, by being ordered to one another and to the unity of the whole. Find out what the author’s problems were.

American Lit 2010-01 American Lit 2010-01 Presentation Transcript

  • American Literature 201 August 18 Michael Simpson Section 051 “ Old and new make the warp and woof of every moment. There is no thread that is not a twist of these two strands. By necessity, by proclivity and by delight, we all quote. It is as difficult to appropriate the thoughts of others as it is to invent.” Ralph Waldo Emerson * * Sante, Luc. “The Fiction of Memory” The New York Times. March 14, 2010.
  • Class Summary
    • Next Week’s Assignments
    • Course Logistics
      • Schedule – 1 st Half of Semester
      • Graded Assignments
      • Blogging Assignments
    • Levels of Reading
    • “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” (1 – 5)
  • Next Week’s Assignments
    • August 23
      • Set up personal blog and email me to confirm
      • Deadline for 1 st blog
      • Read “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” (6 – 9)
    • August 25
      • Read William Bradford (IV – XXXVI)
      • Deadline for 2 nd blog
  • Course Logistics
    • Schedule – 1 st Half of Semester
    • Graded Assignments
    • Blogging Assignments
      • 10 blogs / 5 of which are graded
      • Grade not final until changes made
      • Points off
        • Not 10 blogs (- 1 for each missing)
        • Missing blog deadline (- 1 for each missed deadline)
  • Levels of Reading
    • Elementary
    • Inspectional
      • Systematic Skimming
      • Superficial Reading
    • Analytical
      • What is the work about as whole
      • What is being said in detail
      • How is it being said in detail
    • Syntopical (Comparative)
    1940 - 1967 1972 - Present
  • Lectio Divina From the very earliest accounts of monastic practice – dating back to the fourth century – . . . a form of reading called lectio divina (“divine” or “spiritual reading”) was essential to any deliberate spiritual life. This kind of reading is quite different from that of scanning a text . . . , or advancing along an exciting plotline to a climax in the action. It is, rather, a meditative approach, by which the reader seeks to savor and taste the beauty and truth of every phrase and passage. . . . There are four steps in lectio divina : first, to read, next to mediate, then to rest in the sense of God’s nearness, and, ultimately, to resolve to govern one’s actions in the light of new understanding. This kind of reading is itself an act of prayer. [xii] Thornton, John F., and Susan B. Varenne. “About the Vintage Spiritual Classics” The Confessions . By Saint Augustine. Trans. Maria Boulding. Vintage Books: New York. 1998. xi-xii.
  • Lectio Divina From the very earliest accounts of monastic practice – dating back to the fourth century – . . . a form of reading called lectio divina (“divine” or “spiritual reading”) was essential to any deliberate spiritual life. This kind of reading is quite different from that of scanning a text . . . , or advancing along an exciting plotline to a climax in the action. It is, rather, a meditative approach, by which the reader seeks to savor and taste the beauty and truth of every phrase and passage . . . . There are four steps in lectio divina : first, to read, next to mediate, then to rest in the sense of God’s nearness, and, ultimately, to resolve to govern one’s actions in the light of new understanding. This kind of reading is itself an act of prayer. [xii] Thornton, John F., and Susan B. Varenne. “About the Vintage Spiritual Classics” The Confessions . By Saint Augustine. Trans. Maria Boulding. Vintage Books: New York. 1998. xi-xii.
  • “ Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” (1 – 5)
    • Key passages
    • Key words
    • Images vs. ideas
    It avails not, time nor place --- distance avails not, I am with you, you men and women of a generation, or ever so many generations hence, Just as you feel when you look on the river and sky, so I felt, [2183-2184]
  • “ Crossing Brooklyn Ferry”(1 – 5) Saw the reflection of the summer sky in the water, Had my eyes dazzled by the shimmering track of beams, Look’d at the fine centrifugal spokes of light round the shape of my head in the sunlit water, [2184]
  • “ Crossing Brooklyn Ferry”(1 – 5) What is it then between us? What is the count of the scores or hundreds of years between us? Whatever it is, it avails not --- distance avails not, and place avails not I too lived, . . . I too felt the curious abrupt questionings stir within me, I too had been struck from the float forever held in solution, I too had receiv’d identity by my body, That I was I knew was of my body, and what I should be I knew I should be of my body. [2185]
  • Last Questions It is as difficult to appropriate the thoughts of others as it is to invent.” Ralph Waldo Emerson * * Sante, Luc. “The Fiction of Memory” The New York Times. March 14, 2010.