The Culture of Snowboarding Spring Speech 102
Heroes and Legends <ul><li>Craig Kelly was a pioneer of big mountain riding. He spent most of his career riding for Burton...
Heroes and Legends Here is a short trailer called &quot; Let it Ride&quot; It is a documentary of Craig Kelly's life.
Heroes and Legends Victoria Jealouse is one of the greatest female back country riders ever. Like Craig Kelly, she started...
Heroes and Legends  a big mountain rider is. They are very soulful, one with the mountain type of people. The definitely h...
Heroes and Legends Jim Rippey is a combination of big mountain rider, park rider, and all around stunt man. Jim was really...
  descent in Alaska. He was able to combine aspects of park ridding into big mountain riding. He was also the the first pe...
Heroes and Legends So there are all kinds of &quot;Heroes and Legends&quot; of snowboarding, but these were a few that rea...
Heroes and Legends to take off from just riding down the mountain. They were all there when snowboarding was branching out...
Rituals and Activities <ul><li>  With snowboarding comes many different rituals and activities, some of which are shared w...
<ul><li>  Pray for snow parties </li></ul><ul><li>  Pray for snow parties are a common ritual that take place in ski towns...
               Rail jam   A rail jam is a competition in which freestyle riders compete to win based on their style and di...
                Dummy downhill  <ul><li>The dummy downhill is yet another contest where individuals or groups of people bu...
                    Pond Skimming <ul><li>Pond skimming is pretty self explanatory. You ski or board down the hill and app...
                       Heli trips <ul><li>  Im sure that anyone who can say they have a passion for riding, would also say...
                   GAPER DAY! <ul><li>Gapers are a reference to the folks that you might find standing in the middle of th...
<ul><li>So in honor of these goofy tourists the term gaper was brought into play for all the guff that snowboarders have b...
  Values and Principles <ul><li>Snowboarders have an instilled commitment to loyalty, respect for their fellow riders and ...
<ul><ul><li>Loyalty   </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The loyalty aspect of the snowboarding reflects not only the shared bond betw...
<ul><li>This pride in the sport is reflected in less prominent ways as well—in the notable lack of uniform, the often-crit...
The physical drain and training involved with sports also calls for a need to be energetic and persistent. These bring alo...
<ul><ul><li>Respect & Knowledge </li></ul></ul><ul><li>There may be an “I” in snowboarding, but there’s also an “ow.” When...
Likewise, while cool moves are the goal, snowboarders attempt to know their own limits and progress forward at a reasonabl...
Language <ul><li>Importance of Language </li></ul><ul><li>Language is essential for humans to communicate with one another...
Language <ul><li>Adjectives </li></ul><ul><li>Dope: very cool </li></ul><ul><li>Sick/Knarley/Rad: good or awesome; can als...
Language Matthew Sanders Verbs Bonk: the act of hitting an object with the snowboard Fakie: riding the snowboard backwards...
Language Matthew Sanders Nouns Backcountry: areas out of the ski hill boundaries Handy Dandy: a person who cares all over ...
Language Matthew Sanders Sources   http://www.valueseek.com/snowboard_terms.htm   http://www.abc-of-snowboarding.com/snowb...
Appearance <ul><ul><li>Because snow boarders expend larger amounts of energy than Alpine skiers, they tend to dress in lay...
Layered....
NOT  layered......... <ul><li>  </li></ul>
<ul><li>On the upper body snowboarders prefer a thin inner shirt covered by a fleece or similar thermal layer. An outer &q...
While soft snowboard boots are generally warmer than hard-shell Alpine ski boots, most riders still use a heavy pair of co...
Helmets or knit hats are the best at keeping snowboarders heads warm when out on the mountain. If you choose to wear a hel...
Gender <ul><li>Since its creation in the 1970's by male skateboarders and sufers. Snowboarding has and continues to be a m...
<ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Over the years women are becoming more and more accepted in to the sport. Mari Kristin Sisjord...
<ul><li>Are consitered one of the boys, also may have alot of male friends. may be called a &quot;tom boy.&quot; Having co...
BABES <ul><li>May be there to be cool. they have the latest gear and snowboard on weekends, maybe. Do it to hang around, f...
INVISIBLE GIRLS   <ul><li>Aslo consitered &quot;Weekend Warriors.&quot; Are less pro active but look to get closer to the ...
<ul><li>According to the national sporting goods association, womens snowboarding went up from 23% in 2002, to 27% in 2006...
PUNK <ul><li>Wearing more smaller or tigher clothing, may even use more grungy looking and missmatched clothing, including...
HIP-HOP <ul><li>Wearing the more larger styles of clothing, tenting to match and look a little more &quot;Clean&quot; Less...
<ul><li>Gender is stil separated as in most sports, althogh it seems there are more female athleetes then compared to othe...
Gender references <ul><li>Wikipedia </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  Google images </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><u...
Conflict and Animosity <ul><li>Conflict and Tolerance Among Skiers and Snowboarders In Spring of 2004 Brijesh Thapa and  A...
   • Skiers and snowboarders had similar levels of conflict with those of their own group  • However, both skiers and sno...
         • The media is partly responsible for             the  stereotypes attached  to both skiers and snowboarders • Sk...
  • Aggression, equipment, and slope grooming has increased speed and this resulted in lack of control among both skiers a...
The final results of this study found that:   • Presence or behavior of an out-group generates conflict • Groups identify ...
Point of view from a  Snowboarder and Skier • “ From personal experience, as both a skier and snowboarder, when I'm on ski...
Life Outside the Primary Culture <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>A true snowboarder does not have an off s...
Life Outside the Primary Culture <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>For the rest of us, we usually turn to summer sports.  Like e...
Identity: The Individual <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Snowboarding and skii ng is a  culture predicated o n  individualism....
<ul><li>There are the people who ride or ski because it's an image and chicks like it, but they're not part of the true cu...
Identity: Creating It <ul><li>The difference in mentality is what separates a true snowboarder from the rest of the crowd ...
<ul><li>  </li></ul>Identity: Creating It <ul><li>This may sound in opposite of what you would think, but those who choose...
Identity: Creating It <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>It is an incredibly scary journey to self-actualization. It's easier to ...
Identity: The Mentality <ul><li>It is truly difficult to describe the mentality of a snowboarder to someone who has never ...
Identity: Soul Riding <ul><li>Snowboarding love is not something that will ever be captured by the conscious mind.  It is ...
<ul><li>However, the snow board  culture doesn't re st entirely  on individualism. Li ke I said  above, you do share a  ve...
<ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>It will having you giving away extra gear to people who need it even when you're pretty sure y...
Identity: The Community <ul><li>A desire for family isn't usually why we start snowboarding, but it's why we keep doing it...
Identity: Resources <ul><ul><li>Soul Riding:   </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>www.lhds.bcu.ac.uk/research/pdfs/Paper%208.p...
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  • The culture of_snowboarding

    1. 1. The Culture of Snowboarding Spring Speech 102
    2. 2. Heroes and Legends <ul><li>Craig Kelly was a pioneer of big mountain riding. He spent most of his career riding for Burton. In 2003 Craig and six others  died as they were caught in an avalanche in BC, Canada. He started out with competitions, mostly racing comps. As he started riding he made a shift in cultures. The competition culture is one that is very different from big mountain riding. the later is more soulful, and you feel more connected with the mountain. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>http://snowboard.mountainzone.com/craig_kelly.html </li></ul>Laura Jensen
    3. 3. Heroes and Legends Here is a short trailer called &quot; Let it Ride&quot; It is a documentary of Craig Kelly's life.
    4. 4. Heroes and Legends Victoria Jealouse is one of the greatest female back country riders ever. Like Craig Kelly, she started off with competing, and moved onto big mountain riding, and filming. I think Victoria really encompasses what a
    5. 5. Heroes and Legends a big mountain rider is. They are very soulful, one with the mountain type of people. The definitely have the value of respect the mountain. Here is a cool interview with her. http://www.huckmagazine.com/features/victoria-jealouse/
    6. 6. Heroes and Legends Jim Rippey is a combination of big mountain rider, park rider, and all around stunt man. Jim was really able to blend the two very different styles.   Not very many riders have been super successful at doing both, and especially at the same time. Jim really pushed the sport in both aspects. Back in the 90's he was on of the first guys on film to do a back flip on a first
    7. 7.   descent in Alaska. He was able to combine aspects of park ridding into big mountain riding. He was also the the first person to do a back flip on a snowmobile.  Jim would set these crazy goals with snowboarding, and he somehow was able to attain them. Here is a link for an old Standard Film that shows some of his riding, jumping, and flipping. http://www.hulu.com/watch/108006/the-standard-snowboard-show-jim-rippey-and-fredi-kalbermatten
    8. 8. Heroes and Legends So there are all kinds of &quot;Heroes and Legends&quot; of snowboarding, but these were a few that really pushed the sport forward. They all had their own kind of way of progressing the sport at a time when it was really starting to take off and divide into little subcultures. When snowboarding was first starting
    9. 9. Heroes and Legends to take off from just riding down the mountain. They were all there when snowboarding was branching out into racing, park, halfpipe, and big mountain. These three pioneers all had a part in all these aspects of the snowboarding culture. They all advanced the sport in their own way and were definitely a part of history in the making. Of the three riders profile, Victoria is the only one that is still riding and filming.
    10. 10. Rituals and Activities <ul><li>  With snowboarding comes many different rituals and activities, some of which are shared with the ski culture. These activities, (or rituals) include pray for snow parties, pond skimming, rail jams, heli trips, backcountry hiking, torchlite parades and even gaper days. A lot of the information that i have read about the snowboarding culture really seemed to have a lot of stereotypical views of snowboarders in the sense of how they communicate and how they act. Although some of it is true not everyone who snowboards falls under these stereotypes. </li></ul>Rudolph Grasseschi
    11. 11. <ul><li>  Pray for snow parties </li></ul><ul><li>  Pray for snow parties are a common ritual that take place in ski towns all over the world. At these parties you will find music, dancing, contests of many kinds, (sometimes wet t-shirt) food and of course drinking. They can be thrown at a local bar or restaurant or even at an individuals residence. A common practice that you will find at these parties is the burning of skis or snowboards as an act of sacrifice to the snow god. Pray for snow parties are thrown before the winter season arrives. </li></ul>
    12. 12.               Rail jam   A rail jam is a competition in which freestyle riders compete to win based on their style and difficulty of their tricks they perform on the given terrain. Obviously the terrain consists of many rails and/or boxes. There may be cash prizes or sometimes trophies given away depending on the sponsor of the event and are usually divided into age and sometimes gender categories.
    13. 13.                Dummy downhill <ul><li>The dummy downhill is yet another contest where individuals or groups of people build a dummy from whatever they desire, and attach it to a pair of skis or a board. (usually skis from what I have seen) The dummies are judged on how well and if they land withouth being completely destroyed. The dummies sometimes represent a group of people. This season at Diamond Peak resort we had a dummy for each department. One for ski patrol, one for lift operators and so on. It's a lot of fun to watch! </li></ul>
    14. 14.                     Pond Skimming <ul><li>Pond skimming is pretty self explanatory. You ski or board down the hill and approach a man made pool of freezing cold water, hoping that you make it across. In my opinion it's gotta be one of the most entertainig rituals/activities of all. People wear costumes, sometimes go in groups and I've even seen some ride contraptions other than skis or snowboards, into the pond. this event usually takes place towards the end of the season. </li></ul>
    15. 15.                       Heli trips <ul><li>  Im sure that anyone who can say they have a passion for riding, would also say that going on a heli trip would be a dream come true. It'd be like a kid having his or her own theme park all to themselves for a day. Not to mention there are no lift lines, and the possibility of fresh tracks is endless. At times it can be risky and you could even lose your life out there but thats more the thrill of it right? I'd have to say yes. </li></ul>
    16. 16.                    GAPER DAY! <ul><li>Gapers are a reference to the folks that you might find standing in the middle of the slope, taking pictures, possibly just spacing out in awe of the beautiful scenery around them. They're the ones in the flourecent one piece ski suits from the 80's, wearing fanny packs and are usually skiers. </li></ul>
    17. 17. <ul><li>So in honor of these goofy tourists the term gaper was brought into play for all the guff that snowboarders have been given over the years. All in all, it's harmless fun and is just one more activity brought into the culture of snowboarding. </li></ul>
    18. 18.   Values and Principles <ul><li>Snowboarders have an instilled commitment to loyalty, respect for their fellow riders and all around good fun. For the casual snowboarder, these are taken in a recreational or stylistic sense; for one embedded in the culture of </li></ul>Molly Rosen snowboarding, the values that go hand-in-hand with the sport become a part of life.
    19. 19. <ul><ul><li>Loyalty   </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The loyalty aspect of the snowboarding reflects not only the shared bond between groups of riders, but devotion to the activity as a whole. As a fairly new sport, snowboarding is still strongly connected to its roots of pure fun, skill and style and it’s expected for those within the culture to uphold that, especially sponsored  </li></ul><ul><li>riders.“Selling out” is always a  </li></ul><ul><li>concern for professionals,  </li></ul><ul><li>because the snowboarding  </li></ul><ul><li>community places so much  </li></ul><ul><li>importance on the freedom and  </li></ul><ul><li>rebellious nature of the sport. </li></ul>
    20. 20. <ul><li>This pride in the sport is reflected in less prominent ways as well—in the notable lack of uniform, the often-criticized stylization, attitude and flair to riding. For hardcore riders, the devotion to the sport is evident in their even doing it! Many riders spend a great deal of time following the snow just to keep active in the sport—a big commitment (Mouse).  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Commitment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Those immersed in the snowboarding culture may also use the basic principles of the craft as greater philosophies for conduct in life. For example, always looking where you want to go instead of what you don’t want to crash into, and treading with caution into unknown terrain—practical to riding, and useful in building character (Paladino). </li></ul>
    21. 21. The physical drain and training involved with sports also calls for a need to be energetic and persistent. These bring along the recognizable traits of the general snowboarder—spunk, being adventurous, and the individualism that comes with confidence and experience.      For snowboarding to be more than just a hobby, a great level of  commitment and  determination is  required.
    22. 22. <ul><ul><li>Respect & Knowledge </li></ul></ul><ul><li>There may be an “I” in snowboarding, but there’s also an “ow.” When out with a bunch of other riders, respect is key—as with any other sport, snowboarding has a fair share of risks not only with regards to the terrain, but the people riding with each other.  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Coming to the snow prepared enhances the experience for everyone: they need to have a game plan and look out for themselves and others. If there isn’t a sense of teamwork among riders (even if it’s competitive) then while out on a normal ride everybody will just be landing on each other, especially if the weather becomes unpredictable (Bausch). </li></ul>
    23. 23. Likewise, while cool moves are the goal, snowboarders attempt to know their own limits and progress forward at a reasonable pace rather than being crazy and reckless right off the bat—rebellion and flair is good, but stupidity is still, well, stupid. Respect for other riders, the terrain around you, and knowledge of the risk and techniques are fundamental to the underlying snowboarding culture—it carries over to more than just the sport. References: Mouse . &quot;Snowboard the World.&quot; Board The World (2002): 29. Web. 24 Jun 2010. <http://www.boardtheworld.com/Home/Magazine/Editorial/Editorial?&riID=29>.      Paladino, Tom. &quot;Snowboarding can teach us how to be green.&quot; Paladino and Co. (2007): n. pag. Web. 24 Jun 2010. <http://www.djc.com/news/ae/11186812.html>.   Bausch, Kenny. &quot;Snowboard Code – Smart Style.&quot;  Kenny Bausch (2010): n. pag. Web. 24 Jun 2010. <http://kennybausch.clickdeindia.com/2010/06/02/snowboard-code-smart-style/>.
    24. 24. Language <ul><li>Importance of Language </li></ul><ul><li>Language is essential for humans to communicate with one another, and each country has it's own language in which they do this. Furthermore, many cultures within each country have their own ways of manipulating this language and creating their own sub-language. Here I shall provide some examples of adjectives, verbs, and nouns from the snowboarder sub-language here in the U.S. </li></ul>Matthew Sanders
    25. 25. Language <ul><li>Adjectives </li></ul><ul><li>Dope: very cool </li></ul><ul><li>Sick/Knarley/Rad: good or awesome; can also refer to a bad fall </li></ul><ul><li>Sketchy: when someone wobbles when they land a trick </li></ul><ul><li>Stoked: psyched/excited </li></ul><ul><li>Crunchy: used to describe something great; ex: &quot;The snow is really crunchy right now.&quot;   </li></ul>Matthew Sanders
    26. 26. Language Matthew Sanders Verbs Bonk: the act of hitting an object with the snowboard Fakie: riding the snowboard backwards Goofy: riding with the right foot in front instead of the left, which is the normal stance Shreddin'/Ridin'/Cruisin': going down the hill Shreddin' the Gnar: a cooler way to say &quot;We're going snowboarding.&quot;
    27. 27. Language Matthew Sanders Nouns Backcountry: areas out of the ski hill boundaries Handy Dandy: a person who cares all over the place, usually cutting everyone off Jib: an object or obstacle a snowboarder jumps on or jumps over; ex: tree, stump, handrail, walls, vehicles, people, etc. Airdog: a snowboarder who is only interested in going off jumps and performing tricks Base: bottom of the snowboard, usually made of polyethelene or P-Tex
    28. 28. Language Matthew Sanders Sources   http://www.valueseek.com/snowboard_terms.htm   http://www.abc-of-snowboarding.com/snowboarddictionary.asp   Kevin Smith, experienced snowboarder
    29. 29. Appearance <ul><ul><li>Because snow boarders expend larger amounts of energy than Alpine skiers, they tend to dress in layers.  The heavy and bulky parkas used in Alpine skiing don’t work well for snowboarding because they provide too much warmth.  For this reason the Nordic skiers dress in layers as well . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>. </li></ul></ul>John Broadfoot  
    30. 30. Layered....
    31. 31. NOT layered......... <ul><li>  </li></ul>
    32. 32. <ul><li>On the upper body snowboarders prefer a thin inner shirt covered by a fleece or similar thermal layer. An outer &quot;water-proof shell&quot; goes over this. With this type of layering garments can be opened one at a time to shed excess heat and then closed for cold lift rides back to the summit . </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
    33. 33. While soft snowboard boots are generally warmer than hard-shell Alpine ski boots, most riders still use a heavy pair of cotton socks; more to avoid friction and blisters than for warmth
    34. 34. Helmets or knit hats are the best at keeping snowboarders heads warm when out on the mountain. If you choose to wear a helmet, keep in mind that you should select one that breathes appropriately for you as well as one that fits with your favorite goggles, and your personality.
    35. 35. Gender <ul><li>Since its creation in the 1970's by male skateboarders and sufers. Snowboarding has and continues to be a male donminated sport. The pioneers and and first riders being all men, including; Jake Burton, Tom Sims, and, Chuck Barfoot. Today having many female riders, incliding; Tara Dakides, Hannah teter, Kelly Clark, and Gretchin Bleiler. </li></ul>Clint Nichols
    36. 36. <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Over the years women are becoming more and more accepted in to the sport. Mari Kristin Sisjord says that &quot;Females have a more passive attitude and easily adopt the role of spectator.&quot; her interviewies stated &quot;Girls worry about making a fool of themselfs&quot; and &quot;Guys are more ready to drop in, so the Girls are just sitting there.&quot; In the Article bye Sisjord it breaks Females in to three parts. Fast-girls, Babes, And the Invisible girls.   </li></ul>
    37. 37. <ul><li>Are consitered one of the boys, also may have alot of male friends. may be called a &quot;tom boy.&quot; Having confidence in riding and may be even impress male snowboarders. Attempt to improve there position and strategies in snowboarding. </li></ul>FAST-GIRLS
    38. 38. BABES <ul><li>May be there to be cool. they have the latest gear and snowboard on weekends, maybe. Do it to hang around, for the boys, and for the Parties. </li></ul>
    39. 39. INVISIBLE GIRLS   <ul><li>Aslo consitered &quot;Weekend Warriors.&quot; Are less pro active but look to get closer to the among snowboarders. think there not good enough and have a fear of failure. It seems they want to be involved but are to scared, and care of what others think to advance. </li></ul>
    40. 40. <ul><li>According to the national sporting goods association, womens snowboarding went up from 23% in 2002, to 27% in 2006. Even though winther olympics split men and women, many think that women could compete with men. Considering that snowboarding is still a male dominant sport, there are tons of differnt catagories, styles, and types. I dont think it would be as easy as puting the women into catagories. I think I will break them into two catagories, Punk, and Hip-Hop </li></ul>
    41. 41. PUNK <ul><li>Wearing more smaller or tigher clothing, may even use more grungy looking and missmatched clothing, including wild hairdo, and even possibly accsesories. the more aggressive of the snowboarders, also having more attitude. May be more speratic and all over with riding style. </li></ul>
    42. 42. HIP-HOP <ul><li>Wearing the more larger styles of clothing, tenting to match and look a little more &quot;Clean&quot; Less aggressive but may still have attitude. Tend to be more fluid and smooth with the riding styles. </li></ul>
    43. 43. <ul><li>Gender is stil separated as in most sports, althogh it seems there are more female athleetes then compared to other sports that are male dominated. I have stated different groups, styles, men, and women, it is not to say that every snowboarder falls into these. there are obviously snowboarders men and women that may have there own style or category. </li></ul>
    44. 44. Gender references <ul><li>Wikipedia </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  Google images </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  http://www.li.suu.edu/library/circulation/Ostrowsky/ </li></ul><ul><li>soc4700moSnowboardingGenderFall09.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Bing search engine </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/section?content=a917843375&fulltext=713240928#references   </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
    45. 45. Conflict and Animosity <ul><li>Conflict and Tolerance Among Skiers and Snowboarders In Spring of 2004 Brijesh Thapa and  Alan R. Graefe conducted a study to examine conflict and tolerance between skiers and snowboarders using Jacob and Schreyer’s (1980) conflict model </li></ul>Sonia De Leon
    46. 46.    • Skiers and snowboarders had similar levels of conflict with those of their own group • However, both skiers and snowboarders experienced greater enjoyment when in company of their respective groups • Skiers were less accepting than snowboarders regarding the compatibility of both sports • If an individual encounters a member practicing the same activity he/she will have a positive attitude about the encounter • Since 2001 snowboarding is the fastest growing sport among other sports.  Snowboarders have considerably contributed to increase the revenues; however, negative issues still attached to snowboarders
    47. 47.          • The media is partly responsible for           the  stereotypes attached  to both skiers and snowboarders • Skiers have voiced negatively against snowboarders’ attitudes and discourteous behaviors on the slopes, such as jumping unsafely, unfriendliness, and their dress code • Some resorts like to cater only to skiers to avoid conflict.  Others have zoned or segregated certain trails exclusively for skiers or snowboarders   • In 1996, there where 15 ski areas that banned snowboarding but the number now has declined • Skiers’ animosity toward snowboarders  included comments such as ‘snowboarders should leave the mountains for skiers only’ Snowboarders were more willing to share the mountain area with skiers      
    48. 48.   • Aggression, equipment, and slope grooming has increased speed and this resulted in lack of control among both skiers and snowboarders. • Snowboarders’ noise as they grate against the slopes is a concern that make skiers uncomfortable • Snowboarders and skiers were equally tolerant towards skiers • Skiers were less tolerant of snowboarders while snowboarders did not mind the presence or behavior of skiers on the mountain • Snowboarders did not mind the skiers and did  not want to be segregated or zoned but rather prefer to enjoy the area with everyone
    49. 49. The final results of this study found that:   • Presence or behavior of an out-group generates conflict • Groups identify with their own and prefer to be around of their own sport activity • Individuals are more tolerant of others who practice similar recreational activities • Skiers have less tolerance towards snowboarders than snowboarders have towards other snowboarders • Reference: • Thapa, B. and Graefe, A. (Spring, 2004) Recreation Conflict and Tolerance Among Skiers and Snowboarders.  Journal of Parks and Recreation Administration, Volume 22, Number 1 pp 37-52
    50. 50. Point of view from a Snowboarder and Skier • “ From personal experience, as both a skier and snowboarder, when I'm on skis, I hate snowboarders. They are stereotypically young, rude, inconsiderate, disregard right-of-ways and signs. They have a rep for being punks;  most of them wear their snowboard pants super baggy and below their butts. • Skiers generally look down on snowboarders as irresponsible hot-doggers. Now, when I'm on a snowboard, I think skiers are total snobs. They act like they're better than you.  They generally sound condescending when passing &quot;on your left&quot; or chastising you for cutting them off, even when it was you who had the right of way. Most of them wear really cheesy 80s outfits”
    51. 51. Life Outside the Primary Culture <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>A true snowboarder does not have an off season.  They have never summer, meaning when winter ends up here, they go to the southern hemisphere. </li></ul>Donna Mayer
    52. 52. Life Outside the Primary Culture <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>For the rest of us, we usually turn to summer sports.  Like everyone else, we work and go to school.  Seasonal summer jobs are popular.  Unemployment is popular, too. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>Donna Mayer
    53. 53. Identity: The Individual <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Snowboarding and skii ng is a culture predicated o n individualism. You will have friends that you ride with. You will live with people y ou ride with. You will share a distinct bond with anybody and everybody that shares the same mentality, but the mentality itself is based on being an individual.  </li></ul>
    54. 54. <ul><li>There are the people who ride or ski because it's an image and chicks like it, but they're not part of the true culture, and will eventually leave the sport behind. Skiing or riding isn't their passion, it isn't what makes them get up at 6:30 in the morning on their day off. It can be just another accessory; something to wear when people are looking. </li></ul>Identity: The Individual
    55. 55. Identity: Creating It <ul><li>The difference in mentality is what separates a true snowboarder from the rest of the crowd on the hill. Two snowboarders can appear exactly the same; they live in Tahoe and they shred everyday they can, they rock the same brands, and can do the same tricks, but what's different is how snowboarding relates to their individual identity. </li></ul>
    56. 56. <ul><li>  </li></ul>Identity: Creating It <ul><li>This may sound in opposite of what you would think, but those who choose snowboarding as their identity in its entirety are usually the ones that will leave it behind. There are exceptions, of course, but, in my experience, the boys and girls who walk and talk snowboarding 24/7 are more trying to avoid exploring the rest of their identity rather then embracing it in its entirety. </li></ul>
    57. 57. Identity: Creating It <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>It is an incredibly scary journey to self-actualization. It's easier to simply lose yourself in an identity that has already been established. For those of us who take snowboarding as a lifetime of therapy love it for all the other aspects of our lives that it improves and leaves happier. </li></ul>
    58. 58. Identity: The Mentality <ul><li>It is truly difficult to describe the mentality of a snowboarder to someone who has never experienced 6 feet of powder or 30 foot cliff drops. There is no &quot;expert&quot; to consult, there is no book or resource that can tell you even what it is we're looking for it, let alone what it's like when we've found it. But, who is better to ask then a cultural native? </li></ul>
    59. 59. Identity: Soul Riding <ul><li>Snowboarding love is not something that will ever be captured by the conscious mind.  It is finding a peace, a place of love and contentment, that allows you to enjoy exactly what is in front of you and nothing more. It is the day you drop that cliff to take the mountain and there is nothing, absolutely nothing, in your mind. To truly be in the moment is to remember nothing. </li></ul><ul><li>The feeling we earn can't be described. When we return to Earth the feeling is gone, no words ever form as to what it might be. All that remains is pounding adrenaline and the exhileration of knowing that for 2 minutes in the trees, or for 3 pillows, or for one 10 foot rock drop, we were free. And the residue of knowing is enough to keep us in chase of it for as long as we walk. </li></ul>
    60. 60. <ul><li>However, the snow board culture doesn't re st entirely on individualism. Li ke I said above, you do share a very distinct bond with other shredders. This shared emotion will make you take people you've barely said hi to to your favorite back country cliff, or pick up a completely random hitch hikers as long they have a snowboard in their hand. </li></ul>Identity: The Community
    61. 61. <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>It will having you giving away extra gear to people who need it even when you're pretty sure you could have sold it. You'll stop to help an injured shredder, or just ask in passing if they need help and take off to find ski patrol. More then once you'll give advice on the best way to get off the lift to a gaper so they don't have to look so stupid.  </li></ul>Identity: The Community
    62. 62. Identity: The Community <ul><li>A desire for family isn't usually why we start snowboarding, but it's why we keep doing it, day after day. We have no unselfish reasons for loving the ride, shredding is about loving yourself and nobody else. And when you find that place; a space within yourself where you know you are capable of being completely selfish, of putting yourself before any other person or obligation you may have, </li></ul><ul><li>you open yourself to a community of hundreds of others who are capable of the same. This community isn't narrow or judgmental as the term &quot;selfish&quot; might suggest of a community. They will ask for nothing from you other then you to be entirely and exactly who you are. Good, bad, or ugly. And in return, you know that everyone around you is also entirely, completely genuine in the things they say and do. </li></ul>
    63. 63. Identity: Resources <ul><ul><li>Soul Riding:   </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>www.lhds.bcu.ac.uk/research/pdfs/Paper%208.pdf </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.soul-rider.org/?page_id=4 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>  General: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snowboarding </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Community:   </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://snowboarding.transworld.net/tag/snow-blog/ </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://snowboarder-community.com/ </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>  The Individual: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://snowriders.wordpress.com/category/why-we-love-snowboarding/ </li></ul></ul></ul>

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