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Pitching and media relations
Pitching and media relations
Pitching and media relations
Pitching and media relations
Pitching and media relations
Pitching and media relations
Pitching and media relations
Pitching and media relations
Pitching and media relations
Pitching and media relations
Pitching and media relations
Pitching and media relations
Pitching and media relations
Pitching and media relations
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Pitching and media relations

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  • 1. Media Relations and Pitching<br />
  • 2. “There is no point in developing creative and dynamic messages that resonate with our target audiences if the appropriate news media never receive them.”-Barbara Diggs-Brown<br />
  • 3. Pitching<br />Effective PR practitioners build relationships with reporters to establish a good working relationship.<br />They need us for newsworthy, accurate information on deadline, and we need them to help deliver our messages to target publics.<br />
  • 4. We pitch story ideas to reporters via phone, email, and pitch letters.<br />
  • 5. Pitching by phone<br />The phone pitch might be a “cold call,” where we need to introduce ourselves to the reporter. <br />Or, if we’ve already established a relationship with the reporter, it might be an informal conversation.<br />
  • 6. Before you pitch…<br />Start with a specific story angle. Your organization is not a story in itself. Reporters want something newsworthy: try connecting a local angle to a larger national story or a tie-in with current events or holidays.<br />Know WHY you’re pitching. How will this story help meet campaign objectives?<br />Know the outlet’s audience. How will this be relevant to the reporter’s viewers/listeners/readers?<br />
  • 7. Before you pitch…<br />Know the reporter. Have they covered this story before?<br />Find out how the reporter wants to be contacted: phone, FAX, email.<br />Be prepared to SELL the STORY (but don’t overhype).<br />
  • 8. Before you pitch <br />Decide on your three main points, so that you can get to the point quickly (reporters are busy!)<br />Be prepared! Get notes, news releases, and other material in order.<br />Don’t start with the top tier media. Get comfortable by pitching to your second-tier list. Once you have your pitch <br />
  • 9. Pitching by Phone: DO<br />Do create different angles and be prepared to change your pitch mid-stream, in case they are not interested or have already covered something similar to your pitch.<br />Take notes of every contact with a reporter, their interests, action items, etc.<br />Be brief!<br />
  • 10. Pitching by Phone: DON’T<br />DON’T Call reporters on deadline<br />Morning papers, after 2 pm, TV news: 1 hr before air<br />Note this info on your media list (call the editorial asst. to find out deadlines)<br />Don’t leave repeated messages or be pushy. If they say no, be polite and say thank you. They might be interested in the next pitch.<br />Don’t ask for coverage. Reporters don’t owe you anything.<br />
  • 11. Pitching by Email<br />Don’t send attachments. DON’T EVEN THINK about it!<br />Don’t send a mass email. Create a customized pitch for each reporter (and if you must send to multiple recipients, use BCC).<br />Don’t use subject headers that look like spam, e.g. “Hi Rachel!” or “Press Release”<br />Make it short<br />Make it easy to read (paragraphs, spaces)<br />DON’T<br />DO<br />
  • 12. Pitch Letters<br />Pitch letters are more formal that the phone pitch. A pitch letter is often used in a first contact with a reporter, and often accompanies a media kit.<br />Address the letter to a specific reporter or editor and tailored to the publication and its readers. <br />Start the letter with attention-grabbing information. Pique the reporter’s interest!<br />
  • 13. Pitch Letters<br />Offer to set up interviews with key personnel.<br />Offer to provide more information and indicate when you’ll call to follow up. <br />
  • 14. Incoming Requests for Information<br />Handle incoming requests quickly and efficiently. Being dependable on deadline increases trust and credibility.<br />Volunteer info about other products or events.<br />Help them set up interviews with the client.<br />

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