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Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
Interpersonal communication review
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Interpersonal communication review

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  • 1. Interpersonal Communication<br />Practice Reading<br />
  • 2. Interpersonal Communication<br />Interpersonal communication is communication that occurs between two persons who have a relationship between them. It occurs when you send or receive messages and when you assign meaning to such messages. Interpersonal communication is always distorted by noise, occurs within a context, and involves some opportunity for feedback.<br /> Interpersonal communicators are conscious of one another and of their connection with one another. They're interdependent; what one person thinks and says impacts on what the other thinks and says. Interpersonal communication includes the conversations that take place between an interviewer and a potential employee, a son and his father, two sisters, a teacher and a student, two lovers, and two friends. Even the stranger asking for directions from a local resident has a relationship with that person.<br /> In early theories, the communication process was viewed as linear. In this linear view of communication, the speaker spoke and the listener listened; after the speaker finished speaking, the listener would speak. Communication was seen as proceeding in a relatively straight line. Speaking and listening were seen as taking place at different times; when you spoke, you didn't listen, and when you listened, you didn't speak.<br /> This linear model was soon replaced with an interactional view in which the speaker and the listener were seen as exchanging turns at speaking and listening. For example, A spoke while B listened and then B (exchanging the listener's role for the speaker's role) spoke in response to what A said and A listened. Speaking and listening were still viewed as separate acts that did not overlap and that were not performed at the same time by the same person.<br /> A more satisfying view and the one held currently sees communication as a transactional process where each person serves simultaneously as speaker and listener. At the same time that you send messages, you're also receiving messages from your own communications and from the reactions of the other person. At the same time that you are listening, you're also sending messages. In a transactional view, each person is seen as both speaker and listener, as simultaneously communicating and receiving messages. Also, in a transactional view the elements of communication are seen as interdependent (never independent). Each exists in relation to the others. A change in anyone element of the process produces changes in the other elements. For example, you're talking with a group of your friends, and your mother enters the group. This change in "audience" will lead to other changes; perhaps you'll change what you say of how you say it. Regardless of what change is introduced, other changes will be produced as a result. (Devito, Joseph A. Messafes: Building Interpersonal Communication Skills, 4th Ed. pp. 5-6)<br />
  • 3. Step One<br />Take it paragraph by paragraph <br />Make a one sentence summary for each<br />
  • 4. Paragraph 1<br />Interpersonal communication is communication that occurs between two persons who have a relationship between them. It occurs when you send or receive messages and when you assign meaning to such messages. Interpersonal communication is always distorted by noise, occurs within a context, and involves some opportunity for feedback.<br />What is interpersonal communication, how does it happen<br />
  • 5. Paragraph 2<br /> Interpersonal communicators are conscious of one another and of their connection with one another. They're interdependent; what one person thinks and says impacts on what the other thinks and says. Interpersonal communication includes the conversations that take place between an interviewer and a potential employee, a son and his father, two sisters, a teacher and a student, two lovers, and two friends. Even the stranger asking for directions from a local resident has a relationship with that person.<br />Interpersonal communicators have a relationship and are interdependent<br />
  • 6. Paragraph 3<br /> In early theories, the communication process was viewed as linear. In this linear view of communication, the speaker spoke and the listener listened; after the speaker finished speaking, the listener would speak. Communication was seen as proceeding in a relatively straight line. Speaking and listening were seen as taking place at different times; when you spoke, you didn't listen, and when you listened, you didn't speak.<br />Linear model of communication<br />
  • 7. Paragraph 4<br /> This linear model was soon replaced with an interactional view in which the speaker and the listener were seen as exchanging turns at speaking and listening. For example, A spoke while B listened and then B (exchanging the listener's role for the speaker's role) spoke in response to what A said and A listened. Speaking and listening were still viewed as separate acts that did not overlap and that were not performed at the same time by the same person.<br />Interactional model of communication<br />
  • 8. Paragraph 5<br />A more satisfying view and the one held currently sees communication as a transactional process where each person serves simultaneously as speaker and listener. At the same time that you send messages, you're also receiving messages from your own communications and from the reactions of the other person. At the same time that you are listening, you're also sending messages. In a transactional view, each person is seen as both speaker and listener, as simultaneously communicating and receiving messages. Also, in a transactional view the elements of communication are seen as interdependent (never independent). Each exists in relation to the others. A change in anyone element of the process produces changes in the other elements. For example, you're talking with a group of your friends, and your mother enters the group. This change in "audience" will lead to other changes; perhaps you'll change what you say of how you say it. Regardless of what change is introduced, other changes will be produced as a result. <br />Transactional model of communication<br />
  • 9. Paragraph Summaries<br />What is interpersonal communication, how does it happen<br />Interpersonal communicators have a relationship and are interdependent<br />Linear model of communication<br />Interactional model of communication<br />Transactional model of communication<br />
  • 10. Which sentence best states the main idea of this passage?<br />Interpersonal communication is always distorted by noise, occurs within a context, and involves some opportunity for feedback. <br />Communication processes are viewed as varied. <br />Three theories about interpersonal communication, giving meaning to messages sent and received, have evolved over time. <br />Interpersonal communication occurs between two people who have a relationship. <br />
  • 11. Which sentence best states the main idea of this passage?<br />Interpersonal communication is always distorted by noise, occurs within a context, and involves some opportunity for feedback. (paragraph 1)<br />Communication processes are viewed as varied. (yes, but what are they?)<br />Three theories about interpersonal communication, giving meaning to messages sent and received, have evolved over time. <br />Interpersonal communication occurs between two people who have a relationship. (paragraph 2)<br />
  • 12. Which sentence best states the main idea of this passage?<br />Interpersonal communication is always distorted by noise, occurs within a context, and involves some opportunity for feedback. <br />Communication processes are viewed as varied. <br />Three theories about interpersonal communication, giving meaning to messages sent and received, have evolved over time.<br />Interpersonal communication occurs between two people who have a relationship. <br />
  • 13. The primary purpose of this passage is<br />detail the positive and negative aspects of interpersonal communication. <br />give the history of communication processes. <br />describe the characteristics of a few theories of interpersonal communication. <br />analyze the importance of communication processes.<br />
  • 14. Remember MI P P<br />MI: Main Idea<br />P: Purpose<br />P: Pattern<br />
  • 15. The primary purpose of this passage is<br />detail the positive and negative aspects of interpersonal communication. <br />give the history of communication processes. <br />describe the characteristics of a few theories of interpersonal communication. <br />analyze the importance of communication processes.<br />MI: Three theories about interpersonal communication, giving meaning to messages sent and received, have evolved over time.<br />
  • 16. The primary purpose of this passage is<br />detail the positive and negative aspects of interpersonal communication. <br />give the history of communication processes. <br />describe the characteristics of a few theories of interpersonal communication.<br />analyze the importance of communication processes.<br />MI: Three theories about interpersonal communication, giving meaning to messages sent and received, have evolved over time.<br />
  • 17. The overall pattern of organization for this passage is<br />listing<br />classification<br />cause and effect. <br />spatial order.<br />MI: Three theories about interpersonal communication, giving meaning to messages sent and received, have evolved over time.<br />Purpose: describe the characteristics of a few theories of interpersonal communication.<br />
  • 18. The overall pattern of organization for this passage is<br />listing<br />classification<br />cause and effect. <br />spatial order.<br />MI: Three theories about interpersonal communication, giving meaning to messages sent and received, have evolved over time.<br />Purpose: describe the characteristics of a few theories of interpersonal communication.<br />
  • 19. The interactional view of communication sees the sending and receiving of communication as<br />existing in a straight line, taking place at different times. <br />existing in a simultaneous relationship to each other. <br />existing independently of each other. <br />exchanging turns at speaking and listening. <br />
  • 20. Supporting Detail Question<br />Go back to the text<br />Look for “interactional view of communication”<br />Recall paragraph summaries<br />
  • 21. Paragraph Summaries<br />What is interpersonal communication, how does it happen<br />Interpersonal communicators have a relationship and are interdependent<br />Linear model of communication<br />Interactional model of communication<br />Transactional model of communication<br />
  • 22. Paragraph 4<br /> This linear model was soon replaced with an interactional view in which the speaker and the listener were seen as exchanging turns at speaking and listening. For example, A spoke while B listened and then B (exchanging the listener's role for the speaker's role) spoke in response to what A said and A listened. Speaking and listening were still viewed as separate acts that did not overlap and that were not performed at the same time by the same person.<br />The interactional view of communication sees the sending and receiving of communication as ?<br />
  • 23. Paragraph 4<br /> This linear model was soon replaced with an interactional view in which the speaker and the listener were seen as exchanging turns at speaking and listening. For example, A spoke while B listened and then B (exchanging the listener's role for the speaker's role) spoke in response to what A said and A listened. Speaking and listening were still viewed as separate acts that did not overlap and that were not performed at the same time by the same person.<br />The interactional view of communication sees the sending and receiving of communication as ?<br />
  • 24. The interactional view of communication sees the sending and receiving of communication as<br />existing in a straight line, taking place at different times. <br />existing in a simultaneous relationship to each other. <br />existing independently of each other. <br />exchanging turns at speaking and listening.<br />
  • 25. As used in line 3, the word distorted most nearly means<br />“Interpersonal communication is always distorted by noise, occurs within a context, and involves some opportunity for feedback.”<br />interrupted<br />fixed<br />distracted<br />misused<br />
  • 26. As used in line 3, the word distorted most nearly means<br />“Interpersonal communication is always distorted by noise, occurs within a context, and involves some opportunity for feedback.”<br />interrupted<br />fixed<br />distracted<br />misused<br />If something is getting in the way of the communication it would be interrupting.<br />
  • 27. The tone of this passage is<br />informal<br />objective<br />humorous<br />clinical<br />
  • 28. The tone of this passage is<br />informal<br />objective<br />humorous<br />clinical<br />
  • 29. Fact or Opinion?<br />"Even the stranger asking for directions from a local resident has a relationship with that person." (lines 9-10)<br />opinion<br />fact <br />
  • 30. Paragraph 2<br /> Interpersonal communicators are conscious of one another and of their connection with one another. They're interdependent; what one person thinks and says impacts on what the other thinks and says. Interpersonal communication includes the conversations that take place between an interviewer and a potential employee, a son and his father, two sisters, a teacher and a student, two lovers, and two friends. Even the stranger asking for directions from a local resident has a relationship with that person.<br />Shows example of how communicators are interdependent.<br />
  • 31. Fact or Opinion?<br />"Even the stranger asking for directions from a local resident has a relationship with that person." (lines 9-10)<br />opinion<br />fact <br />
  • 32. The relationship of the parts within the following sentence is<br />"They're interdependent; what one person thinks and says impacts on what the other thinks and says." (lines 6-7)<br />Cause and effect <br />Time order <br />Statement and clarification <br />Contrast<br />
  • 33. Look for the punctuation that divides the sentence…<br />"They're interdependent; what one person thinks and says impacts on what the other thinks and says." (lines 6-7)<br />
  • 34. Is there a signal word that follows?<br />"They're interdependent; what one person thinks and says impacts on what the other thinks and says." (lines 6-7)<br />In this case – no<br />Bummer<br />Now what do we do?<br />
  • 35. Look at what the second part of the sentence does for the first…<br />"They're interdependent; what one person thinks and says impacts on what the other thinks and says." (lines 6-7)<br />It tells us what “they’re interdependent” means<br />
  • 36. The relationship of the parts within the following sentence is<br />"They're interdependent; what one person thinks and says impacts on what the other thinks and says." (lines 6-7)<br />Cause and effect <br />Time order <br />Statement and clarification <br />Contrast<br />
  • 37. One conclusion that could be drawn from paragraph five, based on the statements below is<br />For example, you're talking with a group of your friends, and your mother enters the group. This change in "audience" will lead to other changes; perhaps you'll change what you say or how you say it." (lines 30-32)<br />some people may shield their mothers from information. <br />many mothers demand proper respect. <br />many people do not see their mothers as friends. <br />many people do not want to share information with family members. <br />
  • 38. Conclusion = Inference<br />Try to find proof for each of the possible answers<br />Also, in a transactional view the elements of communication are seen as interdependent (never independent). Each exists in relation to the others. A change in anyone element of the process produces changes in the other elements. For example, you're talking with a group of your friends, and your mother enters the group. This change in "audience" will lead to other changes; perhaps you'll change what you say of how you say it. some people may shield their mothers from information.<br />A. some people may shield their mothers from information.<br />
  • 39. Conclusion = Inference<br />Try to find proof for each of the possible answers<br />Also, in a transactional view the elements of communication are seen as interdependent (never independent). Each exists in relation to the others. A change in anyone element of the process produces changes in the other elements. For example, you're talking with a group of your friends, and your mother enters the group. This change in "audience" will lead to other changes; perhaps you'll change what you say of how you say it. some people may shield their mothers from information.<br />B. many mothers demand proper respect.<br />
  • 40. Conclusion = Inference<br />Try to find proof for each of the possible answers<br />Also, in a transactional view the elements of communication are seen as interdependent (never independent). Each exists in relation to the others. A change in anyone element of the process produces changes in the other elements. For example, you're talking with a group of your friends, and your mother enters the group. This change in "audience" will lead to other changes; perhaps you'll change what you say of how you say it. some people may shield their mothers from information.<br />C. many people do not see their mothers as friends. <br />
  • 41. Conclusion = Inference<br />Try to find proof for each of the possible answers<br />Also, in a transactional view the elements of communication are seen as interdependent (never independent). Each exists in relation to the others. A change in anyone element of the process produces changes in the other elements. For example, you're talking with a group of your friends, and your mother enters the group. This change in "audience" will lead to other changes; perhaps you'll change what you say of how you say it. some people may shield their mothers from information.<br />D. many people do not want to share information with family members. <br />
  • 42. Conclusion = Inference<br />Try to find proof for each of the possible answers<br />For example, you're talking with a group of your friends, and your mother enters the group. This change in "audience" will lead to other changes; perhaps you'll change what you say or how you say it." (lines 30-32)<br />some people may shield their mothers from information.<br />many mothers demand proper respect. <br />many people do not see their mothers as friends. <br />many people do not want to share information with family members. <br />

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