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Ho chi minh review Ho chi minh review Presentation Transcript

  • Ho Chi Minh
    Practice Reading
  • Ho Chi Minh was born roughly 9000 miles from America, but he might as well have come from a different planet. Ho was a tiny, frail, thin splinter of a man. He was gentle, and in public always deferential. Even after he had come to sole power in North Vietnam, he steadfastly avoided all the trappings of authority. Instead of uniforms or the white sharkskin suit of the mandarin, Ho favored the simple shorts and sandals worn by the Vietnamese peasants. He was sure of who he was---certain of his place in Vietnamese history-and he had no desire to impress others with his position. To his followers, he was "Uncle Ho," the kind, bachelor relative who treated all Vietnamese citizens like the children he never had. But in the pursuit of Vietnamese independence and the realization of a Communist nation, Ho could be cold-blooded and ruthless.
    Ho was born in 1890 in a village in a central province of the French colony of Vietnam and was originally name Nguyen SinhCung. In 1912 he left Vietnam and began a generation-long world odyssey. Signing on as a sailor abroad a French freighter, he moved from one port to the next. For a time he stayed in the United States, amazed by skyscrapers but also by the fact that immigrants in the United States enjoyed the same rights as American citizens. He was also struck by the impatience of the American people, their expectations of immediate results. (Later during the Vietnam War, Ho would say to his military leaders, "Don't worry, Americans are an impatient people. When things begin to go wrong they'll leave.)
    In 1941 Ho returned to Vietnam. The time was right, he believed, to free Vietnam from colonial domination. During the early part of World War II the Japanese had won control of the country from the French; now Ho and his followers would force out the Japanese. Ho allied himself with the United States. Working alongside American Office of Strategic Services (OSS) agents, he proved his mettle. He impressed the agents with his bravery, intelligence, and unflagging devotion to his cause. On September 2, 1945, borrowing passages from the American Declaration of Independence, Ho declared the independence of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam and became its first president. (Martin, James, et al. 2000. America and Its Peoples. pp. 1000-01)
  • Paragraph 1
    Ho Chi Minh was born roughly 9000 miles from America, but he might as well have come from a different planet. Ho was a tiny, frail, thin splinter of a man. He was gentle, and in public always deferential. Even after he had come to sole power in North Vietnam, he steadfastly avoided all the trappings of authority. Instead of uniforms or the white sharkskin suit of the mandarin, Ho favored the simple shorts and sandals worn by the Vietnamese peasants. He was sure of who he was---certain of his place in Vietnamese history-and he had no desire to impress others with his position. To his followers, he was "Uncle Ho," the kind, bachelor relative who treated all Vietnamese citizens like the children he never had. But in the pursuit of Vietnamese independence and the realization of a Communist nation, Ho could be cold-blooded and ruthless.
  • Paragraph 1
    Ho Chi Minh was born roughly 9000 miles from America, but he might as well have come from a different planet. Ho was a tiny, frail, thin splinter of a man. He was gentle, and in public always deferential. Even after he had come to sole power in North Vietnam, he steadfastly avoided all the trappings of authority. Instead of uniforms or the white sharkskin suit of the mandarin, Ho favored the simple shorts and sandals worn by the Vietnamese peasants. He was sure of who he was---certain of his place in Vietnamese history-and he had no desire to impress others with his position. To his followers, he was "Uncle Ho," the kind, bachelor relative who treated all Vietnamese citizens like the children he never had. But in the pursuit of Vietnamese independence and the realization of a Communist nation, Ho could be cold-blooded and ruthless.
    Ho Chi Minh the “ordinary” man
  • Paragraph 2
    Ho was born in 1890 in a village in a central province of the French colony of Vietnam and was originally name Nguyen SinhCung. In 1912 he left Vietnam and began a generation-long world odyssey. Signing on as a sailor abroad a French freighter, he moved from one port to the next. For a time he stayed in the United States, amazed by skyscrapers but also by the fact that immigrants in the United States enjoyed the same rights as American citizens. He was also struck by the impatience of the American people, their expectations of immediate results. (Later during the Vietnam War, Ho would say to his military leaders, "Don't worry, Americans are an impatient people. When things begin to go wrong they'll leave.)
  • Paragraph 2
    Ho was born in 1890 in a village in a central province of the French colony of Vietnam and was originally name Nguyen SinhCung. In 1912 he left Vietnam and began a generation-long world odyssey. Signing on as a sailor abroad a French freighter, he moved from one port to the next. For a time he stayed in the United States, amazed by skyscrapers but also by the fact that immigrants in the United States enjoyed the same rights as American citizens. He was also struck by the impatience of the American people, their expectations of immediate results. (Later during the Vietnam War, Ho would say to his military leaders, "Don't worry, Americans are an impatient people. When things begin to go wrong they'll leave.)
    Ho Chi Minh the world traveller
  • Paragraph 3
    In 1941 Ho returned to Vietnam. The time was right, he believed, to free Vietnam from colonial domination. During the early part of World War II the Japanese had won control of the country from the French; now Ho and his followers would force out the Japanese. Ho allied himself with the United States. Working alongside American Office of Strategic Services (OSS) agents, he proved his mettle. He impressed the agents with his bravery, intelligence, and unflagging devotion to his cause. On September 2, 1945, borrowing passages from the American Declaration of Independence, Ho declared the independence of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam and became its first president. (Martin, James, et al. 2000. America and Its Peoples. pp. 1000-01)
  • Paragraph 3
    In 1941 Ho returned to Vietnam. The time was right, he believed, to free Vietnam from colonial domination. During the early part of World War II the Japanese had won control of the country from the French; now Ho and his followers would force out the Japanese. Ho allied himself with the United States. Working alongside American Office of Strategic Services (OSS) agents, he proved his mettle. He impressed the agents with his bravery, intelligence, and unflagging devotion to his cause. On September 2, 1945, borrowing passages from the American Declaration of Independence, Ho declared the independence of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam and became its first president. (Martin, James, et al. 2000. America and Its Peoples. pp. 1000-01)
    Ho Chi Minh the leader
  • Paragraph Summaries
    Ho Chi Minh the “ordinary” man
    Ho Chi Minh the traveller
    Ho Chi Minh the leader
  • Which sentence best states the main idea of this passage?
    Ho Chi Minh established Vietnam as an independent country and served as its first president.
    In the pursuit of Vietnamese independence and the realization of a communist nation, Ho could be cold-blooded and ruthless.
    Even after he came to sole power in North Vietnam, he steadfastly avoided all trappings of authority.
    A seemingly unlikely leader, Ho Chi Minh's unassuming nature, world travels and fierce loyalty prepared him for his place in Vietnamese history.
  • Which sentence best states the main idea of this passage?
    Ho Chi Minh established Vietnam as an independent country and served as its first president.
    In the pursuit of Vietnamese independence and the realization of a communist nation, Ho could be cold-blooded and ruthless.
    Even after he came to sole power in North Vietnam, he steadfastly avoided all trappings of authority.
    A seemingly unlikely leader, Ho Chi Minh's unassuming nature, world travels and fierce loyalty prepared him for his place in Vietnamese history.
  • The author's primary purpose is to
    praise Ho Chi Minh as an admirable worldwide figure
    explain the background of Ho Chi Minh, a leader of world significance.
    describe Ho Chi Minh's accomplishments as sole leader of Vietnam.
    persuade the reader to sympathize with Ho Chi Minh's cause.
    MI: A seemingly unlikely leader, Ho Chi Minh's unassuming nature, world travels and fierce loyalty prepared him for his place in Vietnamese history.
  • The author's primary purpose is to
    praise Ho Chi Minh as an admirable worldwide figure
    explain the background of Ho Chi Minh, a leader of world significance.
    describe Ho Chi Minh's accomplishments as sole leader of Vietnam.
    persuade the reader to sympathize with Ho Chi Minh's cause.
    MI: A seemingly unlikely leader, Ho Chi Minh's unassuming nature, world travels and fierce loyalty prepared him for his place in Vietnamese history.
  • What is the relationship between the parts of the following sentence?
    "Even after he had come to sole power in North Vietnam, he steadfastly avoided all the trappings of authority." (lines 3-4)
    Listing
    Contrast
    Cause and effect
    Summary
  • What is the relationship between the parts of the following sentence?
    "Even after he had come to sole power in North Vietnam, he steadfastly avoided all the trappings of authority." (lines 3-4)
    Listing
    Contrast
    Cause and effect
    Summary
  • Switch it up
    "Even after he had come to sole power in North Vietnam, he steadfastly avoided all the trappings of authority." (lines 3-4)
    He steadfastly avoided all the trappings of authority even after he had come to sole power in North Vietnam
    He steadfastly avoided all the trappings of authority__________ he had come to sole power in North Vietnam
    Replace with : although, despite that, in spite of
  • What is the relationship between the parts of the following sentence?
    "Even after he had come to sole power in North Vietnam, he steadfastly avoided all the trappings of authority." (lines 3-4)
    Listing
    Contrast
    Cause and effect
    Summary
  • What is the relationship between the parts of the following sentence?
    "Even after he had come to sole power in North Vietnam, he steadfastly avoided all the trappings of authority." (lines 3-4)
    Listing
    Contrast
    Cause and effect
    Summary
  • As used in line 4, the word steadfastly most nearly means
    forever
    wearily
    persistently
    positively
  • As used in line 4, the word steadfastly most nearly means
    forever
    wearily
    persistently
    positively
  • According to the passage, Ho Chi Minh
    admired the American's expectation of immediate results.
    was amazed that immigrants had the same rights as American Citizens.
    traveled to the cities of Boston, New York City, and San Antonio.
    traveled as a sailor aboard an American freighter.
  • A. admired the American's expectation of immediate results
    Ho was born in 1890 in a village in a central province of the French colony of Vietnam and was originally name Nguyen SinhCung. In 1912 he left Vietnam and began a generation-long world odyssey. Signing on as a sailor abroad a French freighter, he moved from one port to the next. For a time he stayed in the United States, visiting skyscrapers but also by the fact that immigrants in the United States enjoyed the same rights as American citizens. He was also struck by the impatience of the American people, their expectations of immediate results. (Later during the Vietnam War, Ho would say to his military leaders, "Don't worry, Americans are an impatient people. When things begin to go wrong they'll leave.)
  • B. was amazed that immigrants had the same rights as American Citizens
    Ho was born in 1890 in a village in a central province of the French colony of Vietnam and was originally name Nguyen SinhCung. In 1912 he left Vietnam and began a generation-long world odyssey. Signing on as a sailor abroad a French freighter, he moved from one port to the next. For a time he stayed in the United States, amazed by skyscrapers but also by the fact that immigrants in the United States enjoyed the same rights as American citizens. He was also struck by the impatience of the American people, their expectations of immediate results. (Later during the Vietnam War, Ho would say to his military leaders, "Don't worry, Americans are an impatient people. When things begin to go wrong they'll leave.)
  • C. traveled to the cities of Boston, New York City, and San Antonio
    Ho was born in 1890 in a village in a central province of the French colony of Vietnam and was originally name Nguyen SinhCung. In 1912 he left Vietnam and began a generation-long world odyssey. Signing on as a sailor abroad a French freighter, he moved from one port to the next. For a time he stayed in the United States, visiting skyscrapers but also by the fact that immigrants in the United States enjoyed the same rights as American citizens. He was also struck by the impatience of the American people, their expectations of immediate results. (Later during the Vietnam War, Ho would say to his military leaders, "Don't worry, Americans are an impatient people. When things begin to go wrong they'll leave.)
  • D. traveled as a sailor aboard an American freighter
    Ho was born in 1890 in a village in a central province of the French colony of Vietnam and was originally name Nguyen SinhCung. In 1912 he left Vietnam and began a generation-long world odyssey. Signing on as a sailor abroad a French freighter, he moved from one port to the next. For a time he stayed in the United States, visiting skyscrapers but also by the fact that immigrants in the United States enjoyed the same rights as American citizens. He was also struck by the impatience of the American people, their expectations of immediate results. (Later during the Vietnam War, Ho would say to his military leaders, "Don't worry, Americans are an impatient people. When things begin to go wrong they'll leave.)
  • According to the passage, Ho Chi Minh
    admired the American's expectation of immediate results.
    was amazed that immigrants had the same rights as American Citizens.
    traveled to the cities of Boston, New York City, and San Antonio.
    traveled as a sailor aboard an American freighter.
  • "He was sure of who he was--certain of his place in Vietnamese history--and he had no desire to impress others with his position." (lines 6-7)
    The sentence above is a statement of
    fact.
    opinion.
  • "He was sure of who he was--certain of his place in Vietnamese history--and he had no desire to impress others with his position." (lines 6-7)
    The sentence above is a statement of
    fact.
    opinion.
  • According to the passage, during World War II
    Ho Chi Minh and his followers won control of Vietnam from the French.
    Ho Chi Minh and the United States entered into war with each other.
    the Japanese won control of Vietnam from the French.
    the French won control of Vietnam from the Japanese.
  • A. Ho Chi Minh and his followers won control of Vietnam from the French.
    In 1941 Ho returned to Vietnam. The time was right, he believed, to free Vietnam from colonial domination. During the early part of World War II the Japanese had won control of the country from the French; now Ho and his followers would force out the Japanese. Ho allied himself with the United States. Working alongside American Office of Strategic Services (OSS) agents, he proved his mettle. He impressed the agents with his bravery, intelligence, and unflagging devotion to his cause. On September 2, 1945, borrowing passages from the American Declaration of Independence, Ho declared the independence of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam and became its first president.
  • B. Ho Chi Minh and the United States entered into war with each other.
    In 1941 Ho returned to Vietnam. The time was right, he believed, to free Vietnam from colonial domination. During the early part of World War II the Japanese had won control of the country from the French; now Ho and his followers would force out the Japanese. Ho allied himself with the United States. Working alongside American Office of Strategic Services (OSS) agents, he proved his mettle. He impressed the agents with his bravery, intelligence, and unflagging devotion to his cause. On September 2, 1945, borrowing passages from the American Declaration of Independence, Ho declared the independence of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam and became its first president.
  • C. the Japanese won control of Vietnam from the French.
    In 1941 Ho returned to Vietnam. The time was right, he believed, to free Vietnam from colonial domination. During the early part of World War II the Japanese had won control of the country from the French; now Ho and his followers would force out the Japanese. Ho allied himself with the United States. Working alongside American Office of Strategic Services (OSS) agents, he proved his mettle. He impressed the agents with his bravery, intelligence, and unflagging devotion to his cause. On September 2, 1945, borrowing passages from the American Declaration of Independence, Ho declared the independence of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam and became its first president.
  • D. the French won control of Vietnam from the Japanese.
    In 1941 Ho returned to Vietnam. The time was right, he believed, to free Vietnam from colonial domination. During the early part of World War II the Japanese had won control of the country from the French; now Ho and his followers would force out the Japanese. Ho allied himself with the United States. Working alongside American Office of Strategic Services (OSS) agents, he proved his mettle. He impressed the agents with his bravery, intelligence, and unflagging devotion to his cause. On September 2, 1945, borrowing passages from the American Declaration of Independence, Ho declared the independence of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam and became its first president.
  • According to the passage, during World War II
    Ho Chi Minh and his followers won control of Vietnam from the French.
    Ho Chi Minh and the United States entered into war with each other.
    the Japanese won control of Vietnam from the French.
    the French won control of Vietnam from the Japanese.
  • The author shows a bias in favor of
    Ho Chi Minh's commitment to his cause.
    Ho Chi Minh's appearance.
    America's treatment of immigrants
    Ho Chi Minh's world travels
    Bias in favor of = positive feelings about
  • Ho Chi Minh was born roughly 9000 miles from America, but he might as well have come from a different planet. Ho was a tiny, frail, thin splinter of a man. He was gentle, and in public always deferential. Even after he had come to sole power in North Vietnam, he steadfastly avoided all the trappings of authority. Instead of uniforms or the white sharkskin suit of the mandarin, Ho favored the simple shorts and sandals worn by the Vietnamese peasants. He was sure of who he was---certain of his place in Vietnamese history-and he had no desire to impress others with his position. To his followers, he was "Uncle Ho," the kind, bachelor relative who treated all Vietnamese citizens like the children he never had. But in the pursuit of Vietnamese independence and the realization of a Communist nation, Ho could be cold-blooded and ruthless.
    Ho was born in 1890 in a village in a central province of the French colony of Vietnam and was originally name Nguyen SinhCung. In 1912 he left Vietnam and began a generation-long world odyssey. Signing on as a sailor abroad a French freighter, he moved from one port to the next. For a time he stayed in the United States, amazed by skyscrapers but also by the fact that immigrants in the United States enjoyed the same rights as American citizens. He was also struck by the impatience of the American people, their expectations of immediate results. (Later during the Vietnam War, Ho would say to his military leaders, "Don't worry, Americans are an impatient people. When things begin to go wrong they'll leave.)
    In 1941 Ho returned to Vietnam. The time was right, he believed, to free Vietnam from colonial domination. During the early part of World War II the Japanese had won control of the country from the French; now Ho and his followers would force out the Japanese. Ho allied himself with the United States. Working alongside American Office of Strategic Services (OSS) agents, he proved his mettle. He impressed the agents with his bravery, intelligence, and unflagging devotion to his cause. On September 2, 1945, borrowing passages from the American Declaration of Independence, Ho declared the independence of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam and became its first president.
  • The author shows a bias in favor of
    Ho Chi Minh's commitment to his cause.
    Ho Chi Minh's appearance.
    America's treatment of immigrants
    Ho Chi Minh's world travels
    Bias in favor of = positive feelings about
  • What does the following sentence from the first paragraph suggest about Ho Chi Minh?
    "Ho Chi Minh was born roughly 9000 miles from America, but he might as well have come from a different planet." (lines 1-2)
    He was despised by Americans.
    He was a misfit and social outcast.
    His cultural values were in direct contrast to American values.
    He misunderstood American culture.
  • What does the following sentence from the first paragraph suggest about Ho Chi Minh?
    "Ho Chi Minh was born roughly 9000 miles from America, but he might as well have come from a different planet." (lines 1-2)
    He was despised by Americans.
    He was a misfit and social outcast.
    His cultural values were in direct contrast to American values.
    He misunderstood American culture.