Education<br />Practice Reading<br />
Education<br />Of all the ideas advanced by antebellum (pre-Civil War) reformers, none was more original than the principl...
Education: Paragraph One<br />Of all the ideas advanced by antebellum (pre-Civil War) reformers, none was more original th...
Education: Paragraph One<br />Of all the ideas advanced by antebellum (pre-Civil War) reformers, none was more original th...
Education: Paragraph Two<br />From the early days of settlement, Americans attached special importance to education. Durin...
Education: Paragraph Two<br />From the early days of settlement, Americans attached special importance to education. Durin...
Education: Paragraph Three<br />At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the United States had the world's highest lite...
Education: Paragraph Three<br />At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the United States had the world's highest lite...
Education: Paragraph Four<br />	Horace Mann (1796-1859) of Massachusetts was the nation's leading educational reformer. As...
Education: Paragraph Four<br />Horace Mann (1796-1859) of Massachusetts was the nation's leading educational reformer. As ...
Which sentence best states the main idea of this passage?<br />Reformers believed education could be an effective weapon a...
So we learned…<br />Why antebellum reformers believed in education.<br />What they did to reform education.<br />What Hora...
Which sentence best states the main idea of this passage?<br />Reformers believed education could be an effective weapon a...
The author uses an overall organizational pattern that<br />outlines the development of public education as a major concer...
Education<br />Of all the ideas advanced by antebellum (pre-Civil War) reformers, none was more original than the principl...
The author uses an overall organizational pattern that<br />outlines the development of public education as a major concer...
The author uses an overall organizational pattern that<br />outlines the development of public education as a major concer...
Based on the passage, education is important because it is<br />the key to individual happiness.	<br />the key method for ...
Based on the passage, education is important because it is<br />the key to individual happiness.	<br />the key method for ...
Based on the passage = <br />Supporting details <br />…so go to the passage<br />
Why is education important?<br />Of all the ideas advanced by antebellum (pre-Civil War) reformers, none was more original...
Why is education important?<br />Of all the ideas advanced by antebellum (pre-Civil War) reformers, none was more original...
Why is education important?<br />Of all the ideas advanced by antebellum (pre-Civil War) reformers, none was more original...
Based on the passage, education is important because it is<br />the key to individual happiness.	<br />the key method for ...
Based on the passage, education is important because it is<br />the key to individual happiness.	<br />the key method for ...
The tone of this passage could best be described as<br />argumentative.	<br />pessimistic.	<br />nostalgic.	<br />informat...
The tone of this passage could best be described as<br />argumentative.	<br />pessimistic.	<br />nostalgic.	<br />informat...
The tone of this passage could best be described as<br />argumentative.	<br />pessimistic.	<br />nostalgic.	<br />informat...
What is the relationship between the parts of the following sentence? <br />"The campaign for public schools began in earn...
What is the relationship between the parts of the following sentence? <br />"The campaign for public schools began in earn...
What is the relationship between the parts of the following sentence? <br />"The campaign for public schools began in earn...
Identify the relationship between the sentences in paragraph 4.<br />"His efforts resulted in a doubling of state expendit...
Identify the relationship between the sentences in paragraph 4.<br />"His efforts resulted in a doubling of state expendit...
Identify the relationship between the sentences in paragraph 4.<br />"His efforts resulted in a doubling of state expendit...
The word antebellum (line 1) means<br />before the war.	<br />Southern culture.	<br />after the war.	<br />covering all as...
The word antebellum (line 1) means<br />“Of all the ideas advanced by antebellum (pre-Civil War) reformers…” <br />before ...
The word antebellum (line 1) means<br />before the war.	<br />Southern culture.	<br />after the war.	<br />covering all as...
The author's claim that Horace Mann was "the nation's leading educational reformer" (lines 23-24) is<br />adequately suppo...
The author's claim that Horace Mann was "the nation's leading educational reformer" (lines 23-24) is<br />adequately suppo...
The author's claim that Horace Mann was "the nation's leading educational reformer" (lines 23-24) is<br />adequately suppo...
The implied main idea of paragraph FOUR is<br />Horace Mann established teacher certification standards.	<br />Horace Mann...
Paragraph Four:<br />	Horace Mann (1796-1859) of Massachusetts was the nation's leading educational reformer. As a state l...
Paragraph Four:<br />Horace Mann (1796-1859) of Massachusetts was the nation's leading educational reformer. As a state le...
The implied main idea of paragraph FOUR is (What did Horace Mann do for education?)<br />Horace Mann established teacher c...
The implied main idea of paragraph FOUR is<br />Horace Mann established teacher certification standards.	<br />Horace Mann...
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Education

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Education

  1. 1. Education<br />Practice Reading<br />
  2. 2. Education<br />Of all the ideas advanced by antebellum (pre-Civil War) reformers, none was more original than the principle that all American children should be educated to their full capacity at public expense. Reformers viewed education as the key to individual opportunity and the creation of enlightened and responsible citizenry. Reformers also believed that public schooling could be an effective weapon in the fight against juvenile crime and an essential ingredient in the education and integration of immigrants.<br /> From the early days of settlement, Americans attached special importance to education. During the seventeenth century, the New England Puritans required every town to establish a public school supported by fees from all but the poorest families (a requirement later repealed). In the late eighteenth century, Thomas Jefferson popularized the idea that a democratic republic required an enlightened and educated citizenry. Early nineteenth century educational reformers extended these ideas and struggled to make universal education a reality. As a result of their efforts, the northern states were among the first jurisdictions in the world to establish systems of tax-supported, tuition-free public schools.<br /> At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the United States had the world's highest literacy rate--approximate1y 75 percent. The campaign for public schools began in earnest in the 1820s, when religiously motivated reformers supported public education as an answer to poverty, crime, and deepening social divisions. At first, many reformers championed Sunday schools as a way "to reclaim the vicious, to instruct the ignorant, to raise the standard of morals among the lower classes of society." But soon, reformers began to call for public schools.<br /> Horace Mann (1796-1859) of Massachusetts was the nation's leading educational reformer. As a state legislator, in 1837 Mann took the lead in establishing a state board of education. He then resigned his seat to become board secretary. His efforts resulted in a doubling of state expenditures on education. He also won state support for teacher training, an improved curriculum in schools, the grading of pupils by age and ability, and a lengthened school year. In 1852, three years after Mann left office to take a seat in the U. S. Congress, Massachusetts adopted the first compulsory school attendance law in American History. (Martin et al. 2000. America and Its People. pp. 340-41)<br />
  3. 3. Education: Paragraph One<br />Of all the ideas advanced by antebellum (pre-Civil War) reformers, none was more original than the principle that all American children should be educated to their full capacity at public expense. Reformers viewed education as the key to individual opportunity and the creation of enlightened and responsible citizenry. Reformers also believed that public schooling could be an effective weapon in the fight against juvenile crime and an essential ingredient in the education and integration of immigrants.<br />
  4. 4. Education: Paragraph One<br />Of all the ideas advanced by antebellum (pre-Civil War) reformers, none was more original than the principle that all American children should be educated to their full capacity at public expense. Reformers viewed education as the key to individual opportunity and the creation of enlightened and responsible citizenry. Reformers also believed that public schooling could be an effective weapon in the fight against juvenile crime and an essential ingredient in the education and integration of immigrants.<br />Why did antebellum reformers believe in education?<br />
  5. 5. Education: Paragraph Two<br />From the early days of settlement, Americans attached special importance to education. During the seventeenth century, the New England Puritans required every town to establish a public school supported by fees from all but the poorest families (a requirement later repealed). In the late eighteenth century, Thomas Jefferson popularized the idea that a democratic republic required an enlightened and educated citizenry. Early nineteenth century educational reformers extended these ideas and struggled to make universal education a reality. As a result of their efforts, the northern states were among the first jurisdictions in the world to establish systems of tax-supported, tuition-free public schools.<br />
  6. 6. Education: Paragraph Two<br />From the early days of settlement, Americans attached special importance to education. During the seventeenth century, the New England Puritans required every town to establish a public school supported by fees from all but the poorest families (a requirement later repealed). In the late eighteenth century, Thomas Jefferson popularized the idea that a democratic republic required an enlightened and educated citizenry. Early nineteenth century educational reformers extended these ideas and struggled to make universal education a reality. As a result of their efforts, the northern states were among the first jurisdictions in the world to establish systems of tax-supported, tuition-free public schools.<br />What did they do to reform education?<br />
  7. 7. Education: Paragraph Three<br />At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the United States had the world's highest literacy rate--approximately 75 percent. The campaign for public schools began in earnest in the 1820s, when religiously motivated reformers supported public education as an answer to poverty, crime, and deepening social divisions. At first, many reformers championed Sunday schools as a way "to reclaim the vicious, to instruct the ignorant, to raise the standard of morals among the lower classes of society." But soon, reformers began to call for public schools.<br />
  8. 8. Education: Paragraph Three<br />At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the United States had the world's highest literacy rate--approximately 75 percent. The campaign for public schools began in earnest in the 1820s, when religiously motivated reformers supported public education as an answer to poverty, crime, and deepening social divisions. At first, many reformers championed Sunday schools as a way "to reclaim the vicious, to instruct the ignorant, to raise the standard of morals among the lower classes of society." But soon, reformers began to call for public schools.<br />What did they do to reform education?<br />
  9. 9. Education: Paragraph Four<br /> Horace Mann (1796-1859) of Massachusetts was the nation's leading educational reformer. As a state legislator, in 1837 Mann took the lead in establishing a state board of education. He then resigned his seat to become board secretary. His efforts resulted in a doubling of state expenditures on education. He also won state support for teacher training, an improved curriculum in schools, the grading of pupils by age and ability, and a lengthened school year. In 1852, three years after Mann left office to take a seat in the U. S. Congress, Massachusetts adopted the first compulsory school attendance law in American History. (Martin et al. 2000. America and Its People. pp. 340-41)<br />
  10. 10. Education: Paragraph Four<br />Horace Mann (1796-1859) of Massachusetts was the nation's leading educational reformer. As a state legislator, in 1837 Mann took the lead in establishing a state board of education. He then resigned his seat to become board secretary. His efforts resulted in a doubling of state expenditures on education. He also won state support for teacher training, an improved curriculum in schools, the grading of pupils by age and ability, and a lengthened school year. In 1852, three years after Mann left office to take a seat in the U. S. Congress, Massachusetts adopted the first compulsory school attendance law in American History. (Martin et al. 2000. America and Its People. pp. 340-41)<br />What did Horace Mann do to reform education?<br />
  11. 11. Which sentence best states the main idea of this passage?<br />Reformers believed education could be an effective weapon against juvenile crime and in the education of immigrants. <br />Horace Mann is the nation's leading educational reformer. <br />The United States has the world's best public education system. <br />From the early days of settlement, America has attached special importance to education. <br />
  12. 12. So we learned…<br />Why antebellum reformers believed in education.<br />What they did to reform education.<br />What Horace Mann did to reform education.<br />
  13. 13. Which sentence best states the main idea of this passage?<br />Reformers believed education could be an effective weapon against juvenile crime and in the education of immigrants. (first paragraph)<br />Horace Mann is the nation's leading educational reformer. (last paragraph)<br />The United States has the world's best public education system. (not mentioned)<br />From the early days of settlement, America has attached special importance to education. <br />
  14. 14. The author uses an overall organizational pattern that<br />outlines the development of public education as a major concern of America. <br />argues for educational reform. <br />discuss the cause and effects of public education on the development of an individual. <br />contrasts the opposing views about public education.<br />MI: From the early days of settlement, America has attached special importance to education. <br />
  15. 15. Education<br />Of all the ideas advanced by antebellum (pre-Civil War) reformers, none was more original than the principle that all American children should be educated to their full capacity at public expense. Reformers viewed education as the key to individual opportunity and the creation of enlightened and responsible citizenry. Reformers also believed that public schooling could be an effective weapon in the fight against juvenile crime and an essential ingredient in the education and integration of immigrants.<br /> From the early days of settlement, Americans attached special importance to education. During the seventeenth century, the New England Puritans required every town to establish a public school supported by fees from all but the poorest families (a requirement later repealed). In the late eighteenth century, Thomas Jefferson popularized the idea that a democratic republic required an enlightened and educated citizenry. Early nineteenth century educational reformers extended these ideas and struggled to make universal education a reality. As a result of their efforts, the northern states were among the first jurisdictions in the world to establish systems of tax-supported, tuition-free public schools.<br /> At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the United States had the world's highest literacy rate--approximate1y 75 percent. The campaign for public schools began in earnest in the 1820s, when religiously motivated reformers supported public education as an answer to poverty, crime, and deepening social divisions. At first, many reformers championed Sunday schools as a way "to reclaim the vicious, to instruct the ignorant, to raise the standard of morals among the lower classes of society." But soon, reformers began to call for public schools.<br /> Horace Mann (1796-1859) of Massachusetts was the nation's leading educational reformer. As a state legislator, in 1837 Mann took the lead in establishing a state board of education. He then resigned his seat to become board secretary. His efforts resulted in a doubling of state expenditures on education. He also won state support for teacher training, an improved curriculum in schools, the grading of pupils by age and ability, and a lengthened school year. In 1852, three years after Mann left office to take a seat in the U. S. Congress, Massachusetts adopted the first compulsory school attendance law in American History. (Martin et al. 2000. America and Its People. pp. 340-41)<br />
  16. 16. The author uses an overall organizational pattern that<br />outlines the development of public education as a major concern of America. <br />arguesfor educational reform. <br />discuss the cause and effects of public education on the development of an individual. <br />contraststhe opposing views about public education.<br />MI: From the early days of settlement, America has attached special importance to education. <br />
  17. 17. The author uses an overall organizational pattern that<br />outlines the development of public education as a major concern of America.<br />argues for educational reform. <br />discuss the cause and effects of public education on the development of an individual. <br />contrasts the opposing views about public education.<br />MI: From the early days of settlement, America has attached special importance to education. <br />
  18. 18. Based on the passage, education is important because it is<br />the key to individual happiness. <br />the key method for political figures to maintain power. <br />the key weapon against crime. <br />the key to individual opportunity, an effective weapon against crime, and the means to create a responsible citizenry. <br />
  19. 19. Based on the passage, education is important because it is<br />the key to individual happiness. <br />the key method for political figures to maintain power. <br />the key weapon against crime. <br />the key to individual opportunity, an effective weapon against crime, and the means to create a responsible citizenry. <br />
  20. 20. Based on the passage = <br />Supporting details <br />…so go to the passage<br />
  21. 21. Why is education important?<br />Of all the ideas advanced by antebellum (pre-Civil War) reformers, none was more original than the principle that all American children should be educated to their full capacity at public expense. Reformers viewed education as the key to individual opportunity and the creation of enlightened and responsible citizenry. Reformers also believed that public schooling could be an effective weapon in the fight against juvenile crime and an essential ingredient in the education and integration of immigrants.<br /> From the early days of settlement, Americans attached special importance to education. During the seventeenth century, the New England Puritans required every town to establish a public school supported by fees from all but the poorest families (a requirement later repealed). In the late eighteenth century, Thomas Jefferson popularized the idea that a democratic republic required an enlightened and educated citizenry. Early nineteenth century educational reformers extended these ideas and struggled to make universal education a reality. As a result of their efforts, the northern states were among the first jurisdictions in the world to establish systems of tax-supported, tuition-free public schools.<br /> At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the United States had the world's highest literacy rate--approximate1y 75 percent. The campaign for public schools began in earnest in the 1820s, when religiously motivated reformers supported public education as an answer to poverty, crime, and deepening social divisions. At first, many reformers championed Sunday schools as a way "to reclaim the vicious, to instruct the ignorant, to raise the standard of morals among the lower classes of society." But soon, reformers began to call for public schools.<br /> Horace Mann (1796-1859) of Massachusetts was the nation's leading educational reformer. As a state legislator, in 1837 Mann took the lead in establishing a state board of education. He then resigned his seat to become board secretary. His efforts resulted in a doubling of state expenditures on education. He also won state support for teacher training, an improved curriculum in schools, the grading of pupils by age and ability, and a lengthened school year. In 1852, three years after Mann left office to take a seat in the U. S. Congress, Massachusetts adopted the first compulsory school attendance law in American History. (Martin et al. 2000. America and Its People. pp. 340-41)<br />
  22. 22. Why is education important?<br />Of all the ideas advanced by antebellum (pre-Civil War) reformers, none was more original than the principle that all American children should be educated to their full capacity at public expense. Reformers viewed education as the key to individual opportunity and the creation of enlightened and responsible citizenry. Reformers also believed that public schooling could be an effective weapon in the fight against juvenile crime and an essential ingredient in the education and integration of immigrants.<br /> From the early days of settlement, Americans attached special importance to education. During the seventeenth century, the New England Puritans required every town to establish a public school supported by fees from all but the poorest families (a requirement later repealed). In the late eighteenth century, Thomas Jefferson popularized the idea that a democratic republic required an enlightened and educated citizenry. Early nineteenth century educational reformers extended these ideas and struggled to make universal education a reality. As a result of their efforts, the northern states were among the first jurisdictions in the world to establish systems of tax-supported, tuition-free public schools.<br /> At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the United States had the world's highest literacy rate--approximate1y 75 percent. The campaign for public schools began in earnest in the 1820s, when religiously motivated reformers supported public education as an answer to poverty, crime, and deepening social divisions. At first, many reformers championed Sunday schools as a way "to reclaim the vicious, to instruct the ignorant, to raise the standard of morals among the lower classes of society." But soon, reformers began to call for public schools.<br /> Horace Mann (1796-1859) of Massachusetts was the nation's leading educational reformer. As a state legislator, in 1837 Mann took the lead in establishing a state board of education. He then resigned his seat to become board secretary. His efforts resulted in a doubling of state expenditures on education. He also won state support for teacher training, an improved curriculum in schools, the grading of pupils by age and ability, and a lengthened school year. In 1852, three years after Mann left office to take a seat in the U. S. Congress, Massachusetts adopted the first compulsory school attendance law in American History. (Martin et al. 2000. America and Its People. pp. 340-41)<br />
  23. 23. Why is education important?<br />Of all the ideas advanced by antebellum (pre-Civil War) reformers, none was more original than the principle that all American children should be educated to their full capacity at public expense. Reformers viewed education as the key to individual opportunity and the creation of enlightened and responsible citizenry. Reformers also believed that public schooling could be an effective weapon in the fight against juvenile crime and an essential ingredient in the education and integration of immigrants.<br />
  24. 24. Based on the passage, education is important because it is<br />the key to individual happiness. <br />the key method for political figures to maintain power. <br />the key weapon against crime. <br />the key to individual opportunity, an effective weapon against crime, and the means to create a responsible citizenry.<br />
  25. 25. Based on the passage, education is important because it is<br />the key to individual happiness. <br />the key method for political figures to maintain power. <br />the key weapon against crime. <br />the key to individual opportunity, an effective weapon against crime, and the means to create a responsible citizenry. <br />
  26. 26. The tone of this passage could best be described as<br />argumentative. <br />pessimistic. <br />nostalgic. <br />informative. <br />
  27. 27. The tone of this passage could best be described as<br />argumentative. <br />pessimistic. <br />nostalgic. <br />informative. <br />MI: From the early days of settlement, America has attached special importance to education. <br />Pattern: outlines the development of public education as a major concern of America.<br />
  28. 28. The tone of this passage could best be described as<br />argumentative. <br />pessimistic. <br />nostalgic. <br />informative. <br />
  29. 29. What is the relationship between the parts of the following sentence? <br />"The campaign for public schools began in earnest in the 1820s, when religiously motivated reformers supported public education as an answer to poverty, crime, and deepening social divisions." (lines 17-19)<br />Contrast<br />Listing<br />Clarification<br />Time Order <br />
  30. 30. What is the relationship between the parts of the following sentence? <br />"The campaign for public schools began in earnest in the 1820s, when religiously motivated reformers supported public education as an answer to poverty, crime, and deepening social divisions." (lines 17-19)<br />Contrast<br />Listing<br />Clarification<br />Time Order<br />
  31. 31. What is the relationship between the parts of the following sentence? <br />"The campaign for public schools began in earnest in the 1820s, when religiously motivated reformers supported public education as an answer to poverty, crime, and deepening social divisions." (lines 17-19)<br />Contrast<br />Listing<br />Clarification<br />Time Order <br />
  32. 32. Identify the relationship between the sentences in paragraph 4.<br />"His efforts resulted in a doubling of state expenditures on education. He also won state support for teacher training, an improved curriculum in school, the grading of pupils by age and ability, and a lengthened school year." (lines 25-28)<br />Cause and effect <br />Simple listing <br />Addition<br />Time order <br />
  33. 33. Identify the relationship between the sentences in paragraph 4.<br />"His efforts resulted in a doubling of state expenditures on education. He also won state support for teacher training, an improved curriculum in school, the grading of pupils by age and ability, and a lengthened school year." (lines 25-28)<br />Cause and effect <br />Simple listing <br />Addition<br />Time order <br />
  34. 34. Identify the relationship between the sentences in paragraph 4.<br />"His efforts resulted in a doubling of state expenditures on education. He also won state support for teacher training, an improved curriculum in school, the grading of pupils by age and ability, and a lengthened school year." (lines 25-28)<br />Cause and effect <br />Simple listing <br />Addition<br />Time order <br />
  35. 35. The word antebellum (line 1) means<br />before the war. <br />Southern culture. <br />after the war. <br />covering all as in an umbrella. <br />
  36. 36. The word antebellum (line 1) means<br />“Of all the ideas advanced by antebellum (pre-Civil War) reformers…” <br />before the war. <br />Southern culture. <br />after the war. <br />covering all as in an umbrella. <br />
  37. 37. The word antebellum (line 1) means<br />before the war. <br />Southern culture. <br />after the war. <br />covering all as in an umbrella. <br />
  38. 38. The author's claim that Horace Mann was "the nation's leading educational reformer" (lines 23-24) is<br />adequately supported by factual details. <br />inadequately supported by offering a personal opinion. <br />
  39. 39. The author's claim that Horace Mann was "the nation's leading educational reformer" (lines 23-24) is<br />adequately supported by factual details. <br />inadequately supported by offering a personal opinion. <br />
  40. 40. The author's claim that Horace Mann was "the nation's leading educational reformer" (lines 23-24) is<br />adequately supported by factual details. <br />inadequately supported by offering a personal opinion. <br />
  41. 41. The implied main idea of paragraph FOUR is<br />Horace Mann established teacher certification standards. <br />Horace Mann became the nation's most effective educational reformer by leading the fight for government support for public schools. <br />Horace Mann established the State Board of Education. <br />Horace Mann was well respected by educators and lawmakers. <br />
  42. 42. Paragraph Four:<br /> Horace Mann (1796-1859) of Massachusetts was the nation's leading educational reformer. As a state legislator, in 1837 Mann took the lead in establishing a state board of education. He then resigned his seat to become board secretary. His efforts resulted in a doubling of state expenditures on education. He also won state support for teacher training, an improved curriculum in schools, the grading of pupils by age and ability, and a lengthened school year. In 1852, three years after Mann left office to take a seat in the U. S. Congress, Massachusetts adopted the first compulsory school attendance law in American History. (Martin et al. 2000. America and Its People. pp. 340-41)<br />
  43. 43. Paragraph Four:<br />Horace Mann (1796-1859) of Massachusetts was the nation's leading educational reformer. As a state legislator, in 1837 Mann took the lead in establishing a state board of education. He then resigned his seat to become board secretary. His efforts resulted in a doubling of state expenditures on education. He also won state support for teacher training, an improved curriculum in schools, the grading of pupils by age and ability, and a lengthened school year. In 1852, three years after Mann left office to take a seat in the U. S. Congress, Massachusetts adopted the first compulsory school attendance law in American History. (Martin et al. 2000. America and Its People. pp. 340-41)<br />What Horace Mann did to reform education.<br />
  44. 44. The implied main idea of paragraph FOUR is (What did Horace Mann do for education?)<br />Horace Mann established teacher certification standards. (one thing)<br />Horace Mann became the nation's most effective educational reformer by leading the fight for government support for public schools. (most general statement) <br />Horace Mann established the State Board of Education. (one thing)<br />Horace Mann was well respected by educators and lawmakers. (maybe, but what about what he did?)<br />
  45. 45. The implied main idea of paragraph FOUR is<br />Horace Mann established teacher certification standards. <br />Horace Mann became the nation's most effective educational reformer by leading the fight for government support for public schools.<br />Horace Mann established the State Board of Education. <br />Horace Mann was well respected by educators and lawmakers. <br />
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