Sentence Fragments

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Sentence Fragments

  1. 1. Sentence Fragments<br />
  2. 2. What are Fragments?<br />Every sentence must have a subject & verb to express a complete thought. <br />A word group that lacks a subject or a verb & does not express a complete thought is a fragment. <br />The most common types of fragments are…<br />1. Dependant-word fragments<br />2. –ing and to fragments<br />3. Added-detail fragments<br />4. Missing-subject fragments<br />
  3. 3. Dependent-Word Fragments<br />Some word groups that begin with a dependent word are fragments. Here is a list of common dependent words…<br />After, although, though, as, because, before, even though, how, if, even if, in order that, since, that, so that, unless, until, what, whatever, when, whenever, where, wherever, whether, which, whichever, while, who, whoever, whose.<br />
  4. 4. Dependent-Word Fragments (Cont.)<br />Whenever you start a sentence with a dependent word, be careful a fragment does not result. <br />Ex. After I learned the price of new cars. I decided to keep my old pickup.<br />A dependent statement cannot stand alone. It depends on another statement to complete the thought.<br />Ex. After I learned the price of new cars, I decided to keep my old pickup.<br />Dependent statements by themselves are fragments. Attach the dependent sentence to the sentence to come before or after to correct this. <br />
  5. 5. -ing Fragments<br />When an –ingword is at or near the start of a word group, a fragment may result.<br />Ex. I spent two hours on the phone. Trying to find a shop. <br />To correct, attach the –ing fragment to the sentence that comes before or after (whichever makes sense). <br />Ex. I spent two hours on the phone, trying to find a shop.<br />Or, add a subject & change the –ing verb to the correct form.<br />Or, change the verb to the correct form. <br />
  6. 6. ToFragments<br />When to appears at or near the beginning of a word group, a fragment may result.<br />Ex. I plan on working overtime. To finish the job.<br />To correct, add the fragment to the preceding sentence.<br />Ex. I plan on working overtime to finish the job.<br />
  7. 7. Added-Detail Fragment<br />Added-detail fragments often lack a subject and a verb.<br />They often begin with one of the following words: also, especially, except, for example, including, such as.<br />Ex. I love to eat Italian food. Especially spaghetti and lasagna. <br />To correct, attach the fragment to the preceding sentence.<br />Or, add a subject and verb to the fragment.<br />Or, change words as necessary to combine the fragment to a sentence. <br />
  8. 8. Missing-Subject Fragments<br />Sometimes a word group is missing a subject because the writer thinks the subject from one sentence will apply to the next.<br />Ex. The car swerved. But missed the telephone pole.<br />To correct, attach the fragment to the preceding sentence.<br />Or, add a subject (which can be a pronoun standing for the subject in the preceding sentence).<br />Ex. The car swerved. It missed the telephone pole.<br />
  9. 9. Still unsure?<br />Read sentences out loud. Pause after every period. If sentence doesn’t make sense by itself, it may be a fragment.<br />Ask yourself who or what is the subject of the sentence. If you do not have one, you may have a fragment.<br />

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