ACH 231 Lecture 01 (The Profession)
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ACH 231 Lecture 01 (The Profession)

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ACH 231 Lecture 01 (The Profession) ACH 231 Lecture 01 (The Profession) Presentation Transcript

  • Be sure the volume is on or turned up to hear sound.
  • He looked at the granite. To be cut, he thought, and made into walls. He looked at a tree. To be split and made into rafters. He looked at a streak of rust on the stone and thought of iron ore under the ground. To be melted and to emerge as girders against the sky. These rocks, he thought, are here for me; waiting for the drill, the dynamite and my voice; waiting to be split, ripped, pounded, reborn, waiting for the shape of my hands will give to them. Ayn Rand, The Fountainhead
  • Have you ever asked yourself... What is an “Architect?” View slide
  • People need buildings. People in buildings. People need buildings…….. and they need……… neighborhoods, complexes, towns, cities, parks, suburbs To people, Architects build these things. But is that what they really do ? live, work, play, congregate, learn, govern, consume, View slide
  • What is an “Architect?” A common misconception: An architect is…… “ Someone who makes blue-prints”
  • What is an “Architect?”
    • The general public really doesn’t have a understanding as to WHAT an Architect does, let alone WHO an Architect is.
    • To start with, Architecture is a profession .
    • By definition, a profession is:
    • pro·fes·sion   Pronunciation [pr uh - fesh - uh n]
    • – noun
    • a vocation requiring knowledge of some department of learning or science: the profession of teaching.
    • any vocation or business.
    • the body of persons engaged in an occupation or calling: to be respected by the medical profession.
    • the act of professing; avowal; a declaration, whether true or false: professions of dedication.
    • the declaration of belief in or acceptance of religion or a faith: the profession of Christianity.
    • a religion or faith professed.
    • the declaration made on entering into membership of a church or religious order.
    • By definition, a profession is:
    • pro·fes·sion   Pronunciation [pr uh - fesh - uh n]
    • – noun
    • a vocation requiring knowledge of some department of learning or science: the profession of teaching.
    • any vocation or business.
    • the body of persons engaged in an occupation or calling: to be respected by the medical profession.
    • the act of professing; avowal; a declaration, whether true or false: professions of dedication.
    • the declaration of belief in or acceptance of religion or a faith: the profession of Christianity.
    • a religion or faith professed.
    • the declaration made on entering into membership of a church or religious order.
    OK, so maybe numbers 4, 5, 6, & 7 don’t fit here, but you get the picture.
  • What is a profession?
    • Noted educator, Abraham Flexner, defined profession , as opposed to other kinds of vocations, with six attributes:
    • involves a store of knowledge that is more than ordinarily complex;
    • is an intellectual enterprise;
    • applies theoretical and complex knowledge to the solution of human and social problems;
    • strives to add to and improve the stock of knowledge;
    • passes its knowledge to novice generations, usually through universities; and
    • tends to organize in peer formations that establish criteria for admission, practice, and conduct.
  • The profession of Architecture is much like that of the profession of Law or Medicine…….. it serves the PEOPLE An Architect provides a service to the people. We design buildings. And parks. And towns, cities, metropolitans, complexes, environments.
  • So now we’re back to…… The American College Dictionary says: Architect , noun 1. One whose profession it is to design buildings and superintend their construction. 2. The deviser, maker, or creator of anything. From the Greek “architekton” – chief builder. What is an “Architect?” .
  • I like this one better: “ Architects, professionals trained in the art and science of building design and licensed to protect health, safety and welfare , transform these needs into concepts and then develop the concepts into building images that can be constructed by others” Lee Waldrep, PhD; Becoming an Architect But we’re still only scratching the surface.
  • Ok, so lets talk about skills that an Architect has: Designer Seller Researcher Interpreter Planner Coordinator Writer Estimator Financial Manager Educator Politician Juggler Student Communicator
  • Ok, so lets talk about skills that an Architect has: Designer Aesthetics – Artist & Sculptor Practicality – Combining theory and building material/ technology Function – spaces are organized for maximum use
  • Ok, so lets talk about skills that an Architect has: Communicator verbal, visual, written, graphic, technical
  • Ok, so lets talk about skills that an Architect has: determining objectives & goals establishing methods for achieving the objectives & goals establishing priorities amongst the methods, objectives & goals Planner
  • Ok, so lets talk about skills that an Architect has: sell to the client your services sell to the client on your design sell to the client to build it sell, sell, sell….. Seller
  • Ok, so lets talk about skills that an Architect has: Building Materials Design Codes Project Requirements (Program, budget, Site Issues) Design & Product Standards Knowing the “right” questions to ask Researcher
  • Ok, so lets talk about skills that an Architect has: Interpreter Building Materials Design Codes Project Requirements (Program, budget, Site Issues) Design & Product Standards Knowing the “right” questions to ask Product Performance Information Test Results Contract Clauses Construction Documents Answers given to the questions asked
  • Ok, so lets talk about skills that an Architect has: Coordinator Transferring information amongst the people involved in the project.
  • Ok, so lets talk about skills that an Architect has: proposals contracts specifications letters marketing drawing notes Writer
  • Ok, so lets talk about skills that an Architect has: Estimator time & cost for performing the Architectural Services determining project construction costs
  • Ok, so lets talk about skills that an Architect has: managing costs for project production managing business finances Financial Manager
  • Ok, so lets talk about skills that an Architect has: Teaching others about things they don’t know about Mentor Faculty in architecture schools Educator
  • Ok, so lets talk about skills that an Architect has: “ Life-long Learner” Learning about new and revised things Maintaining knowledge of the current “Standard of Practice” Continuing Education required to maintain licensure Student
  • Ok, so lets talk about skills that an Architect has: knowing how to get people to do things they don’t want to do providing encouragement to those unsure of themselves knowing how to communicate w/out offending Politician
  • Ok, so lets talk about skills that an Architect has: Keeping many things going at the same time “ Project Manager” Juggler
  • Some of you have some of these skills, and some of you will acquire these skills. Most important is how to use these skills to advance towards your goals: academic, career, personal
  • The profession of Architecture is widely supported and tightly accounted for, regulated and governed. Support comes in the form of the AIA…… American Institute of Architects a 150 year old organization with the architects interests at heart AIA is our voice AIA serves the profession the American Institute of Architects (AIA) has been the leading professional membership association for licensed architects, emerging professionals, and allied partners since 1857. Through education, legislative and regulatory development, professional education, and research, the AIA and its more than 83,000 members express their commitment to excellence in design and livability in our nation’s buildings and communities.
  • The profession of Architecture is widely supported and tightly accounted for, regulated and governed. Accounting in the accreditation of architecture education…. NAAB National Architectural Accrediting Board an agency that accredits curriculums for architecture schools across the country NAAB is our accountability NAAB sets the standards for education the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) is the sole agency authorized to accredit professional degree programs in architecture in the United States. Since most US state registration boards require any applicant for licensure to have graduated from a NAAB-accredited program, obtaining such a degree is an essential aspect of preparing for the professional practice of architecture. While graduation from a NAAB-accredited program does not assure registration, the accrediting process is intended to verify that each accredited program substantially meets those standards that, as a whole, comprise an appropriate education for an architect.
  • The profession of Architecture is widely supported and tightly accounted for, regulated and governed. Regulation in standards of licensing requirements……. NCARB National Council Architectural Registration Boards a facilitator for the protection of the health, safety, and welfare of the general public National Council Architectural Registration Boards requires a NAAB-accredited degree, successful completion of the Intern Development Program (IDP) and successful completion of the Architect Registration Examination (ARE). NCARB protects and enhances the validity of the Intern Develop Program (IDP) and the Architect Registration Examination (ARE). NCARB encourages all architects to become Certificate holders. NCARB advocates for the elimination of impediments to reciprocity. NCARB serves as the trusted international center of registration data and regulatory information. NCARB values diversity of opinion and representation. NCARB promotes recognition of the architect as the primary building professional qualified to protect the health, safety, and welfare of the public, through the enhancement of the quality of the built environment and the richness of space and form.
  • The profession of Architecture is widely supported and tightly accounted for, regulated and governed. Governed by the agency that regulates the practice of architecture in the state……. SBOA State Board of Architects Sets forth the code of ethics by which Architects practice The State Board of Architects qualifies and licenses individuals seeking licensure and issues permits to business entities through which architecture is practiced. The Board regulates the practice of architecture under the provisions of Business Occupations and Professions Article, Annotated Code of Maryland, Title 3 and the Code of Maryland Regulations, Title 9, Subtitle 21. The Board investigates complaints against licensees and permit holders, as well as complaints related to unlicensed practice. The Board may issue a reprimand, suspend or revoke a license or permit, and / or impose a fine.
  • “ what is and who is an architect, and how and why is he?..... Well, the word arch, in the sense that it’s in architecture, means like the archbishop, means the top, the arch, the high one, the one above all the others. Then tech of course you know the meaning of; that’s technology, technique, tech like the Toltecs. Tech means the know-how, means how to put things together. So the proper translation of the word architect is the ‘master of the know-how’” -Frank Lloyd Wright Speaking to the Taliesin Fellowship November 30, 1958 excerpted from How to Work with an Architect
  • Professor Brandi R. Shepard© ACH 231-Professional Practices