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Recurrent actiongrammar techersguide-1 Document Transcript

  • 1. Copyright © 2005, 2009 by Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn. All rights re- served. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including pho- tocopying, recording or by any information storage or retrieval sys- tem, without permission from the author, with the following exceptions: (1) single copies of any portion or of the entire Teacher’s Resource Guide may be made by teachers for their own use; (2) Word Searches and Word Scrambles may be photocopied for classroom use only; (3) transparencies may be made for classroom use only and (4) pages A, B, C and D (immediately following page 144 in the Unit 7 section) may be photocopied for classroom use only to provide the correct material for students who have faulty copies of the Level 2 Workbook (see the following note). Under no circumstances may copies of any part or all of the Teacher’s Resource Guide be sold. Note serious printing error in the Level 2 Workbook for Unit 7: The printers accidentally substituted the Level 1 version of Unit 7 for the Level 2 version in the Level 2 Workbook. We have made an effort toTEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 contact people who purchased this faulty version of the first edition of the book, to replace it with a corrected version. If the Workbook(s) you and your students are using do not match the instructions and solutions shown in this Guide, please go to info@cpli.net to request replacement copies. Or, if your students are already well into the semester when you see this, use the instructions and pages given in this Guide to correct or replace the faulty pages (66-67, 70, 75 and 76 in the Level 2 Workbook). The corrected pages can be found immediately following page 144 in the Unit 7 section. www.cpli.net Please Note: Please email corrections and comments to info@cpli.net. ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009
  • 2. Please Note: Instructions framed in single-outlined boxes are only for stu- dents using the Level 1 Workbook, and instructions framed in double-outlined boxes are only for students using the Level 2 Workbook. Any paragraphs not boxed at all are instructions which apply to both Workbooks.TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 Please Note: If you would prefer to use a guide in the form of a physical book instead of downloading this Guide, the entire Guide is included in the author’s book Recurrent Action Grammar (2009). www.cpli.net ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009
  • 3. INTRODUCTION This Teacher’s Guide, and the two Live Action English Interactive Workbooks, Level 1 and Level 2, have been written specifically to accompany the software Live Action Eng- lish Interactive. These two Workbooks are not a series! Students will not use first one book and then the other. Rather, they will use one or the other as they make their way thru the software, depending on their level at the time. It is also recommended that, before beginning with the software and the workbooks, sev- eral of the lessons in the book Live Action English be taught first, to familiarize the stu- dents with the procedures of a TPR action series, and to introduce at least the Present Progressive, the Present, the Simple Past and the Future tenses before venturing into the software and the workbooks. The author usually begins with page 1, “Washing Your Hands” (great for introducing the Present Progressive tense), and continues with at least pages 2-7, introducing one per day (or per two days), before getting to the first unit in the software, “Good Morning.” For a complete guide for beginning with eight of the first Live Action English action se- ries, and an expanded description of the methods used in this guide, see the book Recur- rent Action Grammar (Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009, Command PerformanceTEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 Language Institute). What follows are some notes on two unique properties of the Live Action English course and curriculum. 1. REDUNDANCY IN FORM, VARIETY IN CONTEXT—a different way to or- ganize the ESL curriculum While most language learning materials present different language forms (verb tenses, modals, subject/verb agreement, adjective/noun word order, formation of questions and negatives, use of prepositions, etc.) in each chapter or unit of study, along with an intro- duction of new vocabulary and a new context for each, the Live Action English curricu- lum also presents a new context for each lesson (the action series, to be acted out by the students), but uses that context to practice very similar language forms each week. So, www.cpli.net for example, the four tenses included in the curriculum, Present Progressive, Simple Pres- ent, Simple Past, and Future, are often all presented in the same unit, all in real time to create a natural context. And most of them are presented in almost every unit (note: the future tense is not presented in the first five units). ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 This built-in redundancy helps the students to acquire the different forms, as they are confronted with them repeatedly thruout the semester. In contrast, many beginning ma- terials leave the introduction of the past tense, for example, to the end of the text, so that the students who are not present for that particular week miss it entirely. In the Live Ac- tion English course, it cannot be missed, as it is presented again and again thruout the semester, often in exactly the same way, differing only in vocabulary and context.
  • 4. This is uniquely effective for adult non-credit open-entry/open-exit classes where the stu- dents come and go and attend as their adult lives, full of adult responsibilities to jobs and family, allow. But it is even more effective with the students of all ages who attend every class session; they are the ones who reap the full benefit of the natural redundancy this curriculum format provides. And not only are the language forms reinforced by constant repetition in this format, but the vocabulary of the action series is also practiced and re-practiced, first in the context of one verb tense, and then in another and another. So by the end of each unit, the stu- dents have learned and used in context the -ing and past forms of each verb in the par- ticular lesson. But doesn’t this redundancy get annoying or boring to the faithfully regular attenders? Not at all. Because the action series, which provide the context of each day’s class session, are so varied, and so actively and graphically presented and practiced with physical ac- tivity and props and thru natural conversation, that the students have the impression of anything but redundancy. They have been know to excitedly exclaim at the end of a class session that this is their favorite feature of these materials: “I love this class! We do some- thing different every day!”TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 2. MEANINGS of verb tenses thru REAL TIME CONTEXT and CONTRAST Another feature provided by this course that is absent in many language teaching mate- rials is the acquisition of not just the formation of the verb tenses, but also natural, real- time contexts for each verb tense, so that its meaning is clear and can be naturally internalized by the student who is engaged in the activities. In many materials the focus of the exercises is on the formation of the verb tenses, a left-brain intellectual exercise, and the meanings of the utterances being practiced are all but forgotten for the duration of the exercise. In the Live Action English course presented in this Guide, the right side of the brain is engaged in the holistic experience of the physical activity, so that even as the students are being asked to use the correct forms, they are also constantly and fully aware of the mean- ing of what is being said. www.cpli.net To further reinforce the meanings of the various tenses, this course is also full of con- trastive exercises where the students are asked to use their cognitive skills to consider the difference in meaning of one verb tense contrasted with another, or often with two or even three other verb tenses. This gets some of the more right-brained students to increase ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 their awareness of the different verb tenses, encouraging them to engage their internal “monitors” of their use of the language (see Krashen).
  • 5. To bring about real acquisition of English, please read this guide and follow the instructions for the classroom activities. It is hoped that the teachers using the Live Action English Interactive Workbooks with their students will not limit themselves to just the simple written exercises in the Work- books, but will take the time and effort to read, digest, and use the many TPR activities and dictations presented here to help their students to use the language of the action se- ries actively and physically, thereby engaging both sides of the brain for a full and natu- ral language learning/acquisition experience. Please feel free to contact the author at ekuiz@earthlink.net with questions or comments about the use of any activity or exercise in this Guide. As mentioned above, if you would prefer to use a guide in the form of a physical book instead of downloading this Guide, the entire Guide is included in the author’s book Recurrent Action Grammar (2009). That book includes additional material and information on the methodology used in the Guide, forming a complete beginning course. ReferencesTEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 Asher, James J. 1996. Learning Another Language Through Actions: The Complete Teacher’s Guidebook. 5th ed. Los Gatos, CA: Sky Oaks. García, Ramiro. 1988. Instructor’s Notebook: How to Apply TPR for Best Results. 2nd ed. Los Gatos, CA: Sky Oaks Krashen, Stephen D. 1981. Second Language Acquisition and Second Language Learning. Oxford: Perga- mon Press. Ray, Blaine and Contee Seely. 2008. Fluency Through TPR Storytelling. 5th ed. Berkeley, CA: Command Per- formance Language Institute. Romijn, Elizabeth Kuizenga. 1998. Puppies or Poppies? ESL Bingo. Berkeley, CA: Command Performance Language Institute. Romijn, Elizabeth Kuizenga. 2005. Live Action English Interactive Workbooks, Levels 1 and 2. Berkeley, CA: www.cpli.net Command Performance Language Institute. Romijn, Elizabeth Kuizenga and Contee Seely. Live Action English Millennium (3rd) ed. 1997. Berkeley, CA: Command Performance Language Institute. ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 Romijn, Elizabeth Kuizenga, Contee Seely, Larry Statan, Elizabeth Hanson-Smith and Robert Wachman. 2008. Live Action English Interactive, v.1.4. Berkeley, CA: Command Performance. Seely, Contee and Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn. 2006. TPR Is More Than Commands—At All Levels. 3rd ed. Berkeley, CA: Command Performance Language Institute.
  • 6. 7 UNIT 1 Good Morning Introducing Vocabulary The Action Series Imperatives Text Page 1: Action Series from the Software The action series of imperatives at the beginning of each unit are basically vocabulary lessons which establish the vocabulary at the beginning of each class session in which this vocabulary will be used. This is to ensure that everyone is clear on the meaning of all these words before continuing on to expand their use in the ensuing activities. The final objective for these vocabulary lessons is for each student to be able to tell another student to perform the series (Memorization is not necessary! Students can be reading the se- ries.) and, conversely, to be able to respond physically to another person’s delivery of the commands.TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 GOOD MORNING 1. Wake up! 2. Stretch and yawn and rub your eyes. 3. Get up. 4. Do your exercises. 5. Wash your face. 6. Get dressed. 7. Make the bed. 8. Eat breakfast. 9. Read the newspaper. www.cpli.net 10. Brush your teeth. UNIT 11. Put on your sweater. 1 12. Kiss your family goodbye. 13. Leave the house. ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009
  • 7. 8 To enact this series of actions in the classroom: Receptive Stage: Listening with Books Closed 1. Setting up (gather the props and set up before class begins) Set up one area of the room as the bedroom, with a chair with a small blanket (a doll blanket or baby blanket will do) and a small pillow. Set up another area as the bathroom, with a toothbrush, towel, bar of soap, and a picture of a sink. Set up one more area as the kitchen, with a basic place setting (plate, fork, spoon, cup), and a newspaper on a table or desk. 2. Initial demonstration of series Sit in the “bedroom” chair with your head on the pillow (behind you against the wall, for example) and the blanket over your shoulders and chest. Tell the students that it is 7:00 in the morning and everybody is sleeping. Tell everyone to close their eyes (and close your own!). When everyone is quiet, make the sound of the alarm clock, and announce each im- perative from the series just as you begin to demonstrate it yourself. Encourage the stu- dents to do the actions too. Do not allow them to talk or repeat your words at this time. At the end of the series, ask for a volunteer to take your place and to repeat the actions,TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 using the props, as you tell him or her what to do (reading the series). 3. Group live action Read thru the series again several times without performing the actions yourself, to check students’ comprehension. They should all be responding physically (pantomim- ing, without props) to each imperative. If they cannot, repeat step 2 until they can. Receptive Stage: Reading 4. Reading and listening with books open Have the students open their books to page 1, and read along silently as you read the series again. Ask them still not to repeat, but only to listen while you read it. This is also the time to ask for questions about the meanings of the words. Hopefully, most of the questions can be answered with props and/or actions, using the context of the situation www.cpli.net presented in the action series. UNIT Expressive Stage: Speaking 1 5. Oral repetition and question/answer period ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 Now have the students repeat the words of the series after you. Pay particular atten- tion to individual words that give the students problems, and to intonation and words that run together in natural speech. Ask for questions about the pronunciations of in- dividual words.
  • 8. 9 6. Student(s) speaking/other person responding Ask for a volunteer to read the series to you, as you respond appropriately to each com- mand. Or, as the items of the series are numbered, assign each number to a different stu- dent to read in order, as you respond physically to the commands. Next, with the whole class looking on, have one student read the series while another student responds physi- cally. 7. Students all working in pairs When you feel that the students are clear enough on the language of the series (com- prehending, responding, pronouncing), ask them to work in pairs or threes, one telling (reading) what to do and the other(s) listening and responding physically. Circulate around the room, listening for problems, answering questions, encouraging reluctant or hesitant students to try it, or just observing all the different ways that different students find to fix the new words in their minds. The first six steps are used as a method of preparing students to be ready to work effec- tively and independently in the seventh and final step (pair practice). These first six steps are only suggestions and can be changed or alternated. You may experiment and do what- ever you find necessary to properly prepare students for step 7. If you run out of time during the class session, start at the beginning again at the next session. The review will go faster and make things easier for everybody.TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 Note: This action series is shown in a video at the beginning of the first unit of the software (the “Watch” screen). Altho this action series is quite easy to depict with props in the classroom, you may wish to show the video as part of your ini- tial presentation of the action series. If you don’t have access to the software, but do have access to the Internet, you can find this video on YouTube as “LAEi Good Morning.” www.cpli.net UNIT 1 ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009
  • 9. 10 Practicing the Present Progressive Tense The Pantomime Game Subject Pronouns, Possessive Adjectives What...? Questions with Long Answers Introducing the English Auxiliary Verb System Text Page 2: Present Progressive, Long Answers What follows is a description of a way to introduce and drill the present progressive tense. In subsequent units, when the Pantomime Game comes up again, you will be referred back to these pages for using this game to introduce and drill this tense. The more your students have played this game (in the different contexts of the various action series), the less instruction will be required in terms of prompting students with the appropriate responses, and of explaining how to form the verb tense. Be careful not to abandon these instructions too early, however. Students of any new skill, especially a skill as complicated as language, need a lot of repetition; that’s what this book is all about! Lesson—The Pantomime Game Pantomime, without props, one of the actions of the “Good Morning” series on page 1, asking students at the same time, “What am I doing?” Low Beginners will probably answer with the appropriate line from the series, in the nowTEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 inappropriate imperative form, and High Beginners may answer this way too. For example, if you are washing your face, and ask them, “What am I doing?” They may answer with “wash your face.” Encourage them, saying: THAT’S RIGHT, I’M WASHING MY FACE www.cpli.net UNIT 1 After they’ve heard your present progressive version several times, write this verb form on the board and explain that you’re no longer giving instructions, as you were doing on page ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 1 (imperative form), but are now talking about an action that is happening right now, at the same time they’re talking. Have them repeat the appropriate response in the second person. In other words, when you ask “What am I doing?” have them repeat, “You’re wash- ing your face.” Repeat this with every action in the series, reminding them to use the -ing forms of the verbs as they answer you. This is an introduction to the present progressive tense for users of the Level 1 Workbook and a review of the tense for users of the Level 2 Workbook.
  • 10. 11 Next, have members of the class do certain actions, and ask them what they’re doing. Better yet, ask them to do any action from the lesson—this is much more interesting and makes a game of it: “Luis, show us a different action from the same lesson; no, don’t say anything, just do one action. Look, everybody, look at Luis. What is he doing?” Point out (or in the case of High Beginners, remind them) that the verb to be is used here, and re- view its various forms, if necessary. Along with the present progressive, introduce or review possessive adjectives: “Luis, wash your face. What’s he doing?” “He’s washing his face.” “Anne, wash your face. What’s she doing?” “She’s washing her face.” “Look, everybody, what am I doing?” “You’re washing your face.” Introduction to the Written Exercise (for Level 1) While presenting and playing the Pantomime Game, you may have written the pos- sessive adjectives on the board. If you have not already done so, list them now with their corresponding subject pronouns: I myTEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 you your she her he his we our they their Then have the students open their books and complete the Long Answer exercise on page 2. Exercise (or Dictation) (for Level 2) When you are satisfied that the students have a fairly good grasp of how to formulate the answers to the questions in the Pantomime Game, have them open their books and complete the exercise on page 2. If they experience quite a bit of difficulty with it, www.cpli.net or you expect that they will, dictate the answers to them instead. Or ask the first ques- UNIT tion, pointing to the illustration there, and after one student, or the whole class, has answered the question, tell them to write or complete the answer to number 1, before 1 going on in a similar way to item number 2. ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 1. What is she doing? She’s washing her face. 2. What are you doing? I’m rubbing my eyes. 3. What are they doing? They’re brushing their teeth. 4. What is he doing? He’s putting on his sweater. 5. What are we doing? We’re doing our exercises. 6. What am I doing? You’re kissing your family goodbye.
  • 11. 12 For either level, the question of consonant doubling may come up at any time. See notes for text page 46, on page 97, for tips on teaching or reviewing this rule as well as the rule to drop silent -e. Correcting the Exercise After the students are finished, write the answers on the board so that the students can correct their own work, or go around the room and check their work yourself. You can also have individual students volunteer to come to the board to write one item each. (This can take a lot less time than just one person—you!—writing the whole exercise, because this way several students may write their respective items at the same time.) After students are finished and the entire exercise is on the board, go over each item together, asking the students if anything needs correcting. Dictation At this point, Low Beginning students can be given a dictation: dictate the questions and answers of the exercise on page 2, or the answers only (according to the capabili- ties of your students). Students can write the dictation on a separate piece of paper or on page 9 of their workbooks. The dictation is an exercise, not a test! Students with literacy problems (even if just mild literacy problems) should be allowed to refer to the exercise as often as needed, even to the extent of copying, to ensure that they write the sentences correctly. In this way they will begin to acquire experience with the fact that English spelling does notTEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 represent the spoken word very accurately, as they hear, see and write the words all at the same time. After the dictation, have students correct their own, or a classmate’s paper, comparing it to the corrected exercise on page 2. Pronunciation Practice When the exercise has been corrected, have the students repeat the questions and an- swers after you, to practice their pronunciation. Pair Practice Have the students practice the questions and answers in pairs. Suggested instructions: Now practice speaking, two people together. One person can read the questions (with beautiful pronunciation!). You’re the teacher. Point to the picture, read the question and listen to your friend’s an- swer to see if it’s correct. Help your friend if the answer is not correct. www.cpli.net UNIT The other person is the student. Look at the picture and answer the question, but don’t read the answer! Only look at the photo in your “teacher’s” book. 1 Your “teacher” will help you if you are not correct. Only one person is supposed to read from the book! ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 If you have a problem or a question, please ask me. If necessary, demonstrate this process with two students who understand, or who can catch on quickly, or you can demonstrate it yourself with one student. Group Work Here is an alternative to pair practice. It may be a bit tricky to set this up the first few
  • 12. 13 times you try it with each class, but the effort is well worth it, as it can be a very pro- ductive practice session, with the students taking the initiative themselves to direct their own practice. It also uses the real-time context of live action instead of the tiny photo- graphs in the Workbook. Have the students get up and move their chairs into circles to form groups of 4 or 5. If pos- sible, make sure each group has at least one “he” and one “she” so the group will be prac- ticing all pronouns. Then have them tell each other to do (pantomime) an action (by reading one item of the action series on page 1). While one or more of the students are doing the action, ask the rest of the group the question. Demonstrate this with one group before everyone tries this. For example: 1. (To a female student) Wash your face. (S washes her face.) (To rest of group) What’s she doing? She’s washing her face. 2. (To one student) Rub your eyes. (S rubs his/her eyes.) (To same student) What are you doing? I’m rubbing my eyes. 3. (To two students) Brush your teeth. (Ss brush their teeth.) (To rest of group) What are they doing? They’re brushing their teeth. 4. (To a male student) Put on your sweater. (S puts on his sweater.) (To rest of group) What’s he doing? He’s putting on his sweater. 5. (To whole group) Do your exercises. (Everyone, including the speaker, does theirTEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 exercises.) (To whole group) What are we doing? We’re doing our exercises. 6. (S pantomimes kissing family) (To rest of group) What am I doing? You’re kissing your family goodbye. Emphasize that this is the present progressive tense, so it’s important to have an action first, and then, during the action, to ask the question. While students are practicing, circulate to offer any help needed. If a group is trying to discuss everything in their own language(s), again direct them thru the exercise yourself until they catch on. If one student clearly understands the proce- dures, ask that one student to be the “director” of the group, but instruct him or her not to try to explain what to do, but just to take on the role of the teacher and to start doing it. Before you go on to the next group, watch to see that they’re getting it, and then tell www.cpli.net them to continue practicing, but to speak only English. UNIT Text Page 3: Present Progressive, Short Answers 1 The Importance of the English Auxiliary Verb System ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 The English system of auxiliary verbs is perhaps the most difficult aspect of English grammar for speakers of other languages to learn, partly because of its complexity, but also because of the fact that it is so foreign—few languages have anything like it, espe- cially the way auxiliaries are used alone in English phrases, e.g.: I do, You are, Should we? Neither have they. Because of this difficulty, and because the auxiliary verb system is so fundamental to understanding the English use of verbs and verb tenses, it is useful to
  • 13. 14 familiarize students at the lowest levels of English acquisition with its use in normal con- versation. One simple way we use it overtly is in Short Answers—simple if you limit your- self to one or two auxiliaries at a time. Students often get all the way to advanced stages of fluency without ever understanding even this elementary use of auxiliaries, answer- ing yes/no questions with a large variety of auxiliaries but never selecting the correct one! (Did you see him? Yes, it is. Will they recognize you? No, they don’t.) However, if students are guided thru the correct selection of person, tense and auxiliary verbs from the most rudimentary levels of their acquisition of English, they come out with an implicit understanding of the way the system works, and they have no problem sorting thru all the choices available to them later at the more advanced levels. What is so fundamentally important about the English auxiliary system and what is the value of spending so much time and effort to help students grasp it? English auxiliaries mark person, tense, voice, and modality—concepts which in other languages are marked in entirely different ways, such as with dozens of verb forms. In English, what our pal- try four or five forms of each verb lack in number, our auxiliary system makes up for in intricacy. Until ESL students understand this basic difference between our verb system and their own, many things we do with verbs in English elude them as subtlety or out- right mystery. For a more thorough treatment of the subject of teaching auxiliary verbs at all levels, and the many ways in which we use them, see Chapter 11 of Puppies or Poppies? ESL Bingo (Romijn, 1998) by the same author. Several of the Short Answer Bingo games fromTEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 that chapter are adapted in this Teachers Resource Guide, beginning with one of the simplest and easiest games, and gradually increasing in difficulty as you and your stu- dents work your way thru this guide. The following exercise introduces the English auxiliary system in a very simple way by teaching Short Answers with only the verb to be in the present tense. Introduction: Yes/No Questions with Short Answers With students’ books closed, ask a student to do an action from the lesson. (You can spec- ify an action or let the student select one.) While the student is pantomiming the action, ask the rest of the class a yes/no question. For example, if the student is doing his exercises, ask the class, “Is he eating breakfast?” When the students say “no,” teach them the short answer form, “No, he isn’t.” Next ask two students to rub their eyes. Ask the rest of the class: www.cpli.net UNIT ARE THEY RUBBING 1 THEIR EYES? ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 When the students say “yes,” teach them the short answer form, “Yes, they are.” With the students’ books still closed, go thru the entire exercise on page 3 in this way, elicit- ing an action from one or two students, and eliciting the correct short answer from the class.
  • 14. 15 Point out that if the question begins with is, the short answer must end with is, and if the question begins with are, the short answer must end with are. The students may also need to have it pointed out that the person (he, she, they, we) must be the same in both question and answer as well. Notice that you have just done the entire written exercise on page 3 orally, before the students have even looked at the page. So now they will open their books and write the answers they have already heard in the context of real-time action. Doesn’t this make the written exercise too easy? Not if short answers are new to them. They’ve begun with live action they can see and understand, they’ve been shown how to answer your ques- tions with the correct form in this meaningful context, and they’ve practiced using these forms in several real-life examples. They still have to make the leap to writing the new forms down for the first time ever. You will see this technique of guiding the students orally thru a written exercise first, and thus providing them with the answers before they see the exercise, used many times in this book. It is a way of instructing the students with very small steps to successful completion of the exercise. As the course progresses, the students will require fewer and fewer of these tiny steps with each subsequent return to each grammatical form. So now finally have the students open their books and complete (for Level 1) or answer (for Level 2) the questions on page 3 with short answers, after you all do item 1 together. Point out that the top photo is for items 1 and 2, the second photo is for numbers 3 and 4, the third is for numbers 5 and 6, and the fourth is for numbers 7 and 8.TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 1. Is she rubbing her eyes? No, she isn’t. 2. Is she getting dressed? Yes, she is. 3. Are they reading the newspaper? Yes, they are. 4. Are they brushing their teeth? No, they aren’t. 5. Is he leaving the house? No, he isn’t. 6. Is he stretching and yawning? Yes, he is. 7. Are we eating breakfast? No, we aren’t. 8. Are we making the bed? Yes, we are. Correcting the Exercise as on page 72 Dictation: Dictate the questions and answers of the exercise. Students can write the dictation on a separate piece of paper or on page 9 of the Level 1 workbook . Upon completion, have vol- unteers come to the board, each writing a different item, so that you can correct them with www.cpli.net UNIT the class’ help, and the students can correct their own papers. Note on Giving Dictations: 1 Don’t hesitate to repeat words and sentences in each item many times. This is excellent ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 aural input during an activity in which the students are very focused on listening to de- tails, but at the same time are very aware of the meaning and content of the sentences they’re hearing. Make the most of it by repeating as many times as needed. Also, vary the speed of delivery, alternating speaking slowly and precisely, with using a natural, con- versational speed, and elision. Pronunciation Practice as on page 12 Pair Practice as on page 12
  • 15. 16 Practicing the Present Tense Conversation About Students’ Lives Action Series in the Present Tense Third Person Singular –s Adverbs of Frequency Text Page 4: Present Tense Conversation For the simple present tense, the context is the students’ own lives. Fortunately, the form of the verb used for the simple present is the same (basic) form used for the imperative form in the action series they have already learned and acquired, making this an easy transition. Introduction/Conversation With students’ books closed, ask several students each question from page 4. Make this as conversational and natural as possible, reacting appropriately to surprising or un- usual answers, etc. Prompting As students attempt to answer your questions, provide them with any words, phrases or word order they are struggling with. Also, provide complete sentences, and have the class repeat these. Being provided with correct forms exactly when they are needed, in orderTEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 to be understood, is a very effective way to use the context of meaning, and aids acquisi- tion immensely. Note that this is not the same as correction. Constantly interrupting a stu- dent who is making herself understood is counterproductive to acquisition and fluency. But providing her with words or phrases she doesn’t know, right when she needs them, is very helpful. Meaning of the Tense Be sure that students are answering the questions about their usual routine, not what they did this morning. Point out that this is the present tense, not the past, so you’re talk- ing about what they do every day, not what they did only this morning. Writing the Exercise Level 1: When you are satisfied that the students have a fairly good comprehension of the questions and answers, have them open their books and complete the exercise on page 4. www.cpli.net UNIT Level 2: When you are satisfied that the students have a fairly good grasp of how to an- 1 swer the questions, have them open their books and write answers to the questions on page 4. ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 Correcting the Exercise Since students will have individual answers, circulate and check their work for accuracy yourself.
  • 16. 17 Pronunciation Practice Have the students repeat the questions after you, to practice their pronunciation. Pair Practice as on page 12 Level 2: Using the answers received during the pair practice about their classmate’s morning routine, have the students write, on a separate piece of paper, the para- graph suggested at the bottom of text page 4. Some review of the third person singu- lar -s will probably be needed beforehand. Refer also to the story (from the software) at the top of page 5. Text Page 5: Present Tense Story from the Software Every Morning Every morning Carol wakes up at 7:00. She gets up and does her exercises. After that she washes her face. Then she gets dressed and makes her bed. She eats breakfast and reads the newspaper. Then she brushes her teeth. Carol puts on her sweater and kisses her family goodbye. She leaves the house at 8:30. Pronunciation Have the students repeat each sentence of this story after you, to practice pronunciation.TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 Grammar For Level 1: At this level, the -s to mark the third person singular form of the present tense verbs is not worth all the class time it would take to develop it. It is a rather late- acquired feature for second language learners of English. It appears here, and on the software, simply to expose the students to it. Of course, if a student notices it and asks about it, it is appropriate to explain it in very basic and succinct terms. But it can also be added that this is something they will be learning about at a more advanced level. It is not recommended that class time be used to practice it at this level. And if no one notices it or asks about it, it is recommended that it not be mentioned at all. Adverbs of Frequency, Personal Questions www.cpli.net Introduction UNIT Ask a student: HOW OFTEN DO YOU EAT 1 BREAKFAST? EVERY DAY, ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 TWO OR THREE TIMES A WEEK, NEVER? Explain that you are asking for frequency. Provide the class with the following adverbs of frequency: always, usually, often, sometimes, hardly ever, never
  • 17. 18 Explain the Meanings of the Words Use whatever means you have to explain the meanings of these adverbs: a. Some teachers just let their students look them up in their bilingual dictionaries. Note: If the students are looking the words up in their dictionaries, tell them to look up rarely or seldom for the meaning of the phrase hardly ever. (hardly ever is used here because it is much more commonly used in spoken language than rarely or seldom). b. If all the students have the same language, the teacher can save a lot of time by trans- lating these six terms. c. Another approach is to give a range of percentages of time for each term: “I always get up at 6:00” means I get up at 6:00 every day, 100% of the time. I usually make the bed means I make the bed most of the time, 51-99% of the time, etc. Conversation Continue asking students, in a natural and conversational way, how often they do vari- ous activities in this lesson. Write the Exercise When you are satisfied that the students have a fairly good comprehension of the mean-TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 ings of the adverbs of frequency, have them open their books and complete the exercise on page 5. Tell them to find something in the list at the top of the page that they always do, and to copy it for the first item, which begins, “I always...,” then to continue with the rest of the items, looking for phrases which are true for them, for each frequency term. Model this for the students by going thru the exercise with personal information about yourself, telling the frequency with which you do various actions which are listed. The additional blank lines are for more practice for those students who finish quickly. Correcting the Exercise Since students will have individual answers, circulate and check students’ work for ac- curacy, helping anyone who is having difficulty or who wants to use additional phrases that they don’t know how to spell. www.cpli.net UNIT 1 ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009
  • 18. 19 Practicing the Past Tense. Who...? Questions with Past Forms Negative Past Tense Sentences Action Series in the Past Tense Conversation About the Students’ Lives Compound Sentences with Time Phrases Text Page 6: Past Tense For Level 1: Introduction This first use of the past tense in the Level 1 Workbook is very simple and straight- forward. It does not involve questions or negative sentences involving the auxiliary verb did. The question form will be introduced on the next page, and the negative sen- tences will be introduced in Unit 8. Go thru the action series once more, this time having a different person perform each ac- tion. When you’re finished, and with the students’ books closed, ask the class the ques- tions on page 6. Prompting When the students respond with the name of the appropriate student for each item,TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 repeat the name and add the word did: Who stretched and yawned? Roberto did. If the students don’t know each other’s names, or how to spell them all, list on the board, in order, the names of the people who have just performed the actions in re- sponse to your commands. Meaning of the Tense Point out that you are now using past forms of the verbs, because you are talking about actions that are finished. Writing the Exercise Have the students open their books and complete the exercise on page 6. www.cpli.net UNIT 1 Correcting the Exercise/Pronunciation Practice Have the students repeat the questions after you, to practice their pronunciation. They will also be able to make any needed corrections at this time. ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 Pair Practice as on page 12 Note: For additional practice, see the Bingo Game based on this exercise on pages 27-29.
  • 19. 20 Text Pages 6-7: Past Tense For Level 2: Introduction The first exercise in the past tense in the Level 2 Workbook involves negative sen- tences, but in a very simple and straightforward way, contrasting the negative forms with the affirmative ones. With students’ books closed, have a male student do all of the actions on page 6. Then state in the past tense what he just did, using the sentences of the exercise. Also name one of the female students. Tell them to imagine that she was sick this morning and stayed in bed, so she didn’t do any of the actions. Then go thru the entire exercise (students’ books are still closed!), contrasting the negative statements about her with the affirmative state- ments about him by reading each pair of sentences to the class as they listen: Ex. He woke up at 7:00 this morning. She didn’t wake up at 7:00. 1. He stretched and yawned. She didn’t stretch and yawn. 2. He rubbed his eyes. She didn’t rub her eyes. 3. He did his exercises. She didn’t do her exercises. 4. He washed his face. She didn’t wash her face. 5. He got dressed. She didn’t get dressed.TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 6. He made the bed. She didn’t make the bed. 7. He ate breakfast. She didn’t eat breakfast. 8. He read the newspaper. She didn’t read the newspaper. 9. He brushed his teeth. She didn’t brush her teeth. 10. He put on his sweater. She didn’t put on her sweater. 11. He kissed his family. She didn’t kiss her family. 12. He left the house. She didn’t leave the house. Lesson Have students open their books. Looking at the example, point out that in negative sen- tences we use the basic forms of the verbs because of the presence of the past form did. www.cpli.net Then we use the past forms of the verbs in the affirmative, where we don’t use the aux- UNIT iliary did. 1 Writing the Exercise ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 Have the students complete the exercise on pages 6 and 7 after you do the example and item 1 together. Correcting the Exercise Circulate to check students’ work.
  • 20. 21 Pronunciation Practice Have the students repeat the sentences after you, to practice their pronunciation. Note: For additional practice of the past forms in this unit, play the Bingo game on pages 27-29. Verb Forms: page 6 for Level 1 page 7 for Level 2 Pronunciation With their books open to the correct page, have the students listen to and repeat the pro- nunciation of the basic forms and past forms of the verbs: basic forms wake stretch yawn rub do wash past forms woke stretched yawned rubbed did washed get dressed make eat read brush put on kiss leave got dressed made ate read brushed put on kissed left Text Page 7: Past Tense Story from the Software PronunciationTEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 Have the student repeat each sentence of this story after you: Carol This morning Carol woke up at 7:00. She got up and did her exercises. After that she washed her face. Then she got dressed and made her bed. She ate breakfast and read the newspaper. Then she brushed her teeth. Carol put on her sweater and kissed her family goodbye. She left the house at 8:30. Text Page 7: You (Personal Questions in the Past Tense) (For Level 1) Introduction/Conversation/Prompting Before having the students complete their own personal answers to the questions on page 7, ask several, or many, students the questions (with their books closed), in a nat- www.cpli.net UNIT ural and conversational manner, reminding them to use the past forms of the verbs. 1 Correcting the Exercise Since students will have individual answers, circulate and check students’ work for ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 accuracy yourself, helping anyone who is having difficulty, or who wants to use ad- ditional phrases that they don’t know how to spell. Lesson After they have completed the exercise, briefly point out that in the questions we use the basic forms of the verbs because of the presence of the past form did. Then we use the past forms in the answers, where we don’t use did.
  • 21. 22 Pronunciation Practice, Pair Practice as on page 12 Text Page 8: Crossword Puzzle See p. 25. Text Page 9: Dictation This page may be used for a dictation of any of the exercises in this unit, as men- tioned in the instructions. Text Page 8-9: Compound Sentences (For Level 2) Part A: Lesson Referring to the story about Carol on page 7, write this sentence on the board: She rubbed her eyes while she stretched and yawned. (These verbs are not in the story, but they are in action series on page 1, and in the list of verb forms.) Instead of referring to the story, you may also create a more immediate context byTEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 asking a female student to rub her eyes and stretch and yawn all at the same time. You could also ask her to go thru the entire action series again in response to your reading of it. This will create the context needed for this exercise. However, since by the time you reach this page, the students will have seen the action series many times, in the imperative form, as well as in the present progressive and past tenses, they will probably not need to go thru it again at this point. This series and order of actions have already been very well established for them. Circle the word while and point out that this is a word connecting two complete sen- tences. You might also want to circle the two sentences: She rubbed her eyes and she stretched and yawned. She did her exercises after she got up. Now write the sentences: www.cpli.net and UNIT 1 She got up before she did her exercises. ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 Circle the words after and before, again pointing out that these words connect two complete sentences.
  • 22. 23 Completing the Exercise Have the students open their books to page 8. Go over the example together. You might want to go thru the entire exercise asking individual students to state the com- pound sentences for each item. Then have the students write the exercise, filling line A only at this time. Example: She rubbed her eyes while she stretched and yawned. 1. She did her exercises after she got up. 2. She got dressed before she made the bed. 3. She ate breakfast while she read the newspaper. Or: She read the newspaper while she ate breakfast. 4. She brushed her teeth before she put on her sweater. 5. She left the house after she kissed her family goodbye. Correcting the Exercise After the students are finished, have volunteers write the sentences on the board. Together, you and the class can then correct the sentences they write. The students can correct their own work. Part B: Lesson Now under the first sentence on the board, write the two phrases in reverse order:TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 While she stretched and yawned, she rubbed her eyes. Point out that this is another way to say exactly the same thing. The only difference is that here you are beginning with the connecting word while and now you need a comma to separate the two complete sentences. (In the first sentence the connecting word while separated them.) www.cpli.net Exercise UNIT Now have the students go back and write each sentence of the exercise again, but this time beginning with the connecting word and remembering to use a comma. 1 Example: While she stretched and yawned, she rubbed her eyes. ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 1. After she got up, she did her exercises. 2. Before she made the bed, she got dressed. 3. While she read the newspaper, she ate breakfast. Or: While she ate breakfast, she read the newspaper. 4. Before she put on her sweater, she brushed her teeth. 5. After she kissed her family goodbye, she left the house.
  • 23. 24 Correcting the Exercise Again, have volunteers write the sentences on the board to be corrected by you and the class together. Writing Assignment To explain why we vary the sentence form in this way, tell the story of Carol with the same form for each sentence to show how boring and monotonous that sounds: Carol woke up. She stretched and yawned and rubbed her eyes. She got up. She did her exercises. She washed her face. She got dressed. She made the bed. She ate breakfast. She read the newspaper. She brushed her teeth. She put on her sweater. She kissed her family goodbye. She left the house. Then have them write about what they did this morning, using compound sentences. Circulate as they write to help people with their sentence structures, and to en- courage them to write in a paragraph form rather than making a list of sentences. Text Page 10: Listening for Sounds of EnglishTEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 Text Page 10: Listening for Sounds of English Have the students open their books to page 10 and listen as you read only one of the words for each item. They are to circle the word you pronounce. 1. John 5 watch 2. yawn 6. kiss 3. rubbed 7. live 4. exercise 8. eat After correcting the exercise together, go over any pairs that the students find particu- larly difficult to distinguish, by writing them on opposite ends of the board and asking the class to point to the word you pronounce. Repeat the two words in random order many times to allow the students to practice listening and distinguishing them. www.cpli.net UNIT 1 ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009
  • 24. 25 Text Page 8: Crossword Puzzle Before Class If possible, make a transparency of the crossword puzzle on page 8, to be used with an overhead projector. Introduction Project the puzzle onto the chalkboard. If your students are unfamiliar with this type of puzzle, explain that the words across and down indicate the direction of the words to be written in the puzzle (point out the spaces for words going across the page and down the page). Ask the class to look at the clue for #2, the first word that goes across, “Make the ______.” What word from the lesson completes this sentence? Now point out the num- ber 2 on the puzzle, and count the three squares there for the word bed. Demon- strate writing each letter of the word bed in a different square on the puzzle. Now go on to item #3 across. What word can we use to complete this sentence? Point out that here we need a word with exactly nine letters. Refer to the action series on page 1 to see what word is needed for this sentence. When someone finds the word newspaper, demonstrate writing the word in the nine squares of the puzzle for #3.TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 Next, demonstrate one of the words for the “DOWN” list, to be written from top to bottom, instead of from left to right. Give the students time to complete this, demonstrating more words, and even all of them, if necessary, to help them understand the concepts involved. Checking the Puzzle Circulate around the room to help individuals who have more difficulty with this than others, and to check the students’ work. Finally, fill in the puzzle projected onto the board. Tip: If you write on the board instead of on the transparency, the transparency can be used again. www.cpli.net UNIT 1 ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009
  • 25. TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 www.cpli.net Solution: 7 11 F 14 A T H 3 T E E C N 4 I S E S E X E C R T R W S H 8 15 10 P H 1 13 I L F M Y A O U M 12 S P R U H O Y E U 5 2 T F S A K A E B R E Y E 9 E H D 6 T E A E S R W R 1 26 UNIT
  • 26. 27 BINGO! Past Tense Before class 1. Bingo grid: Make a copy of the 4x4 Bingo grid at the end of this section for each of your students. 2. Markers: Bring a bag of dried beans, macaroni, or cut-up cardboard for the students to use as markers. 3. Prizes: Bring a bag of wrapped hard candies or inexpensive pencils or other school supplies to give to the winner of each round of the game. Or think of some other way to reward the winner of each round. (You need some sort of reward, for closure, before be- ginning the next round.) Set-up Go thru the action series once more, this time having a different person perform each ac- tion. When you’re finished, ask the class the following questions (reprinted from the Past Tense exercise on page 6 of the Level 1 Workbook). Write the answers to the questions on the board.TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 1. Who stretched and yawned? 2. Who rubbed her eyes? 3. Who did his exercises? 4. Who washed her face? 5. Who got dressed? 6. Who made the bed? 7. Who ate breakfast? 8. Who read the newspaper? 9. Who brushed his teeth? www.cpli.net UNIT 10. Who put on her sweater? 1 11. Who kissed her family? 12. Who left the house? ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 (For Level 1: You can play this game directly following the completion of the exercise on page 6, in which case you will have the names of the 12 students who performed the 12 actions already written on the board.)
  • 27. 28 For four additional items, ask the students yes/no questions about the same 12 actions. For example: Did Ahmad make the bed? No, he didn’t. Did Sara eat breakfast? Yes, she did. Did Masha put on her sweater? No, she didn’t. Did Chen do his exercises? Yes, he did. Write the four short answers on the board as the students answer your questions. Preparation You now have 16 responses on the board, consisting of 12 student names (with the word “did”) and four short answers. Give each student a copy of the Bingo grid. Have them copy each of the responses into one of the 16 squares on the grid, in random order. While the students are preparing their grids, prepare your 16 calling cards by copying one of the 16 responses each on a different card.TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 Explain the Game Suggested script: I’m going to ask one of these questions again, for example, “Who rubbed her eyes?” Don’t say anything! Put a marker on the correct answer like this. When you have four squares marked in one row, say, “Bingo!” They can be horizontal, like this, or vertical, like this, or diagonal, like this. The first person to say Bingo and is correct is the winner. The second person is...too late! Play the Game Scramble the 16 calling cards face down, then select one at random and ask the question which elicits the response on that card. After giving the students enough time to find the correct answer on their Bingo grids, set the card aside and select another card at random and ask the question. www.cpli.net Continue selecting, asking, and setting aside the calling cards until someone says “Bingo!” UNIT If no one says Bingo, but you notice that someone has four marked squares in a row, point this out and coach them to say Bingo! 1 ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 Check for Correct Responses Have the potential winner read the four winning squares to you. Check them against the calling cards you have called and set aside. If all four squares are correct, reward the winner (see “Prizes” on previous page). Have everyone clear their grids of markers and begin again. “New game!”
  • 28. 29 If the four squares do not match the items you have called, announce that there is “No Bingo! Let’s continue!” Word Search and Word Scramble On pages 32 and 33 there are two more puzzles containing words from Unit 1. Their ac- ademic purpose is to provide more practice and experience with the written form of some of the words in this lesson. They also serve the classroom management purpose of being an activity to give to students who have finished some other activity earlier than the others, or to keep all the students in their seats until the class period is over when one activity is completed and there is not enough time to begin something else. They have been put in this teacher’s guide instead of in the student workbooks so that the instructor will be able to use them at the appropriate time. Many students would complete them as soon as they could after buying the book if they had them in their workbooks. There’s nothing wrong with that, of course, unless the instructor needs to use them for the above-stated purpose of classroom management. So permission is granted to make copies of the Word Search and the Word Scramble from each unit, to distribute to the students as needed. Note: The Word Searches in each unit contain words only from the initial action se-TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 ries from the “Watch and Read” screen of the software (for example, on page 1 in Unit 1). Therefore they can be distributed to the students at any time after the introduction of the software lesson, or after the first page of the unit. The Word Scrambles, on the other hand, contain other words from the lessons in the Workbooks. These include inflected forms of verbs (specifically gerunds and past forms), prepositions, adverbs of frequency, and other vocabulary items introduced in the exercises. Therefore, it would be better to hold the Word Scramble of each unit until after the Past Tense exercises have been covered. Word Search The Word Search can be used at any time after the introduction of the software lesson, or after the first page of the unit, because it contains only words from the action series on the first page of the unit. www.cpli.net For students who have never seen this kind of puzzle before, explain that all the words UNIT listed at the bottom of the page are hidden in the square grid of letters. Some are writ- 1 ten left to right, some right to left, some top to bottom, some bottom to top, and some are diagonal (use hand motions over the page to illustrate all these directions). Demonstrate ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 circling one of the words hidden in the grid. Before copying the Word Search for high beginners, you might want to cover, cut off, or white out the word list at the bottom of the page to make the puzzle more chal- lenging. Then you’d need to tell them the number of words they are looking for so they’ll know when they’re finished.
  • 29. 30 Word Search Solution B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . W . . . RN . . B . . . . . S . . . . . A . . D E E . . R . SWE A T E R . . . S . . E AW . . U . . . . SR . . . . . H . . S KSH . S . . . E . E F . . . . . . . S F PO . H . . S . T T A . . . . . . . E AAU . . . I . . ECM . . . Y . . . R S P S . . C . . . EH I . . W . A . . D T E E . R . . . . T . L . . . A . W . . . R . E . . . . . H . Y . . S . K . N . . . X . . . . . . . . . . . . E . E . . . E . . . . . . MAKE . . . . Y . . . . . F A C E . . . . . L . . . . . E . . . . . . . . . . . . . E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A . . . DAER . . . . . . . . . . . . V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R . . E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOO D BY E . . . .TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 Word Scramble Do not distribute the Word Scramble until after the Past Tense exercise has been covered, because this puzzle contains additional words that appear in the exercises. Permission is granted to photocopy the puzzle on page 33 for classroom use only. For students who have never seen this kind of puzzle before, explain that all the words listed at the bottom of the page are listed in the Scrambled List, but the letters are not in the correct order. Demonstrate by writing one of the scrambled words on the board (choose a short one from the list) and asking if anyone can tell what word the letters are from. When someone comes up with it, or if you have to tell them what word it is, write the word on the board. Then, one by one, point to each letter in the word and then to the same letter in the scram- bled word. Emphasize that there have to be exactly the same letters in the word and in www.cpli.net UNIT the scrambled word, no more, no less. Then show them where to write the correct word in the second column (“unscrambled 1 list”). Explain that they have to finish all the words before they can go to the “alphabet- ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 ized list.” With children, wait until all students have completed the unscrambled list to explain how to alphabetize the words. With adults, it is more practical to go around and show each person individually what is required for the alphabetized list, since there will probably be many students who already know how to do this, but others for whom this is a brand new skill to be learned. Remember that some people might not even understand the pur- pose of alphabetizing, so the place to begin for them is to ask them how they can find
  • 30. 31 their name on the attendance roster, or a word in the dictionary. (And they might not know how to find their name in any systematic way!) For Level 2 students, you might want to cut off, or white out, the word list at the bot- tom of the page to make the puzzle more challenging. Word Scramble Solution Scrambled List Unscrambled List Alphabetized List 1. aldyhr hardly always 2. yfialm family breakfast 3. nfeot often brush 4. syalaw always dressed 5. resesixce exercises exercises 6. eewtrsa sweater eyes 7. yese eyes family 8. doybego goodbye goodbye 9. meesitmos sometimes hardly 10. sertbfaka breakfast never 11. yululsa usually newspaper 12. csthert stretch often 13. hrsbu brush rubbingTEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 14. sedresd dressed sometimes 15. nibubrg rubbing stretch 16. penerspwa newspaper sweater 17. rveen never usually www.cpli.net UNIT 1 ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009
  • 31. 32 Date: Name: GOOD MORNING Word Search B A M U B C N J Y R Y R R N U H W W Y R R N R H B H T A U N S C N N Y A A U R D E E H Z R R S W E A T E R E E E S S A E A W N X U D Z V L S R I L E L I H U J S K S H Y S T K F E O E F B I T T H G V S F P O P H F F S G T T A B T O Z C P X E A A U W E T I O Y E C M Z K R Y Q Z D R S P S Q J C O I O E H I X Q W Z A S K D T E E Y R M A S Z T K L R P U A O W S N Q R O E S U C T U H O Y P R S K K Y N Z G M X L P V E P E Z A C U E K E H E Y T T E D W A S X X M A K E Y S E N Y M A UTEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 Z I F A C E G I L W I L C J M T I E S U E K O V I M M I G I O E G R N F R D N T I L R M M L Q K D U C A X G L D A E R X L W J T C N D W S V S V H T M S I V C H N P P Y U G L K R Z W E Q B R E F M I J U I G S F X N U K K X W Z U D J J V S L J O X I Q X B J J X Y X E E L J M H B F K P N T S X F P Y G O O D B Y E Z K A P Word List www.cpli.net UNIT breakfast brush dressed 1 exercises eyes face family goodbye house ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 leave make newspaper read rub stretch sweater teeth wake wash yawn Recurrent Action Grammar © 2009 Elizabeth Kuizenga Romiijn, Command Performance, (510) 524-1191, www.cpli.net
  • 32. 33 Date: Name: GOOD MORNING Word Scramble Scrambled List Unscrambled List Alphabetized List 1. aldyhr 2. yfialm 3. nfeot 4. syalaw 5. resesixce 6. eewtrsa 7. yese 8. doybego 9. meesitmosTEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2 10. sertbfaka 11. yululsa 12. csthert 13. hrsbu 14. sedresd 15. nibubrg 16. penerspwa 17. rveen www.cpli.net UNIT Word List 1 goodbye sometimes brush usually exercises rubbing family always ©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 hardly never sweater often eyes breakfast stretch newspaper dressed Recurrent Action Grammar © 2009 Elizabeth Kuizenga Romiijn, Command Performance, (510) 524-1191, www.cpli.net
  • 33. TEACHER’S RESOURCE GUIDE for Live Action English Interactive WORKBOOKS 1 & 2©Elizabeth Kuizenga Romijn, 2009 www.cpli.net BINGO! 1 UNIT