Ed RichardsonPresidentUSMMATechnology Metals Summit 2013
2013 ©Magnet Development
2013 ©Permanent Magnets Available TodayAlnico FerritesSamariumCobaltNeodymiumIronBoronHighestTemperatureLowest CostHighest...
2013 ©Permanent Magnets Available TodayAlnico FerritesSamariumCobaltNeodymiumIronBoronGenerally Considered “High Performan...
2013 ©Who Produces Them in the U.S.?• Alnico Magnets▫ Thomas & Skinner Indianapolis, IN 170 employees▫ Permanent Magneti...
2013 ©How They Are Made: CastingPour moltenmetal into molds Heat treat Grinding Inspection
2013 ©How They Are Made: SinteringCast Alloy & Crush Press Powder SinterHeat TreatGrindingInspection
2013 ©High-Performance Magnets: Commercial Use• Aerospace▫ Motors▫ Sensors▫ Switches• Medical▫ Transducers• Industrial▫ Mo...
2013 ©High-Performance Magnets: Military UseAGM-114 “Hellfire”Excalibur Artillery Shell JDAM AssemblyF-22A RaptorAIM-9XPha...
2013 ©Military Requirement for Domestic Sources:Some, Not AllHard (Permanent) Magnets Soft Magnetic Materials• Four genera...
2013 ©Why Do We Need A Secure Supply?• Vietnam War▫ Sony withheld cameras used to guide tactical missiles• 1983▫ Socialist...
2013 ©Why Do We Need A Secure Supply?• Critical to our economy▫ Innovation is a key trait of the companies listed in theBu...
2013 ©Case study: NdFeB Magnets and Innovation• “Offshoring technology innovation: A case study ofrare-earth technology,” ...
2013 ©U.S. Production is Vital• Develop unique materials for mission specific DODrequirements, U.S. market needs, AND comm...
2013 ©Summary• U.S. magnetic materials industry is alive.• 10 U.S.C. 2533b “Specialty Metals Clause” applies to the high p...
2013 ©Questions?Ed RichardsonPresidentUSMMA(317) 923-2501enr@usmagneticmaterials.comwww.usmagneticmaterials.com
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Usmma - tms 2013 4 22-13 - 1425

138

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
138
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • How have we come to have the magnet materials that we have today? This chart walks us through the development over the past century. As we see, the strength of magnets has increased dramatically over the past 50 years. Keep in mind that the strength of the magnets is only one design consideration. For many high-tech, and especially defense applications, factors other than magnet strength come into play. In other words, when you are working in extreme environments, designing with magnets is not a simple task. Historically, Alnico was one of the first permanent magnet materials that enabled engineers to incorporate magnets into a wide range of applications. Due to their lower cost, ferrites eventually took over most of the more mundane applications, including audio speakers. As other magnet materials were developed, the four main materials each found a unique performance niche. Now let me begin to draw a picture of what the US magnet industry looks like today. I’ll start with briefly describing my company,
  • The unique characteristics of each make it a viable product for today’s market
  • Ferrites, while not considered high performance, are by far the most widely used magnets in the world The three high performance permanent magnet materials are represented today on our panel. My company, Thomas & Skinner, makes alnico magnets in Indianapolis, Indiana
  • With casting, you’re pouring molten melt into a mold with the part shapes. This is a somewhat inefficient process, due to the relatively low amount of parts yielded as compared to the amount of metal poured. Process does provide dense parts, and therefore the strongest magnetic properties.
  • Using the sintering process, parts can be made more efficiently, but typically do not have as strong of magnetic properties due to a lower density.
  • April 6, 2009 issue of Business Week stated (paraphrasing): While each year some companies invariably ride the wave of powerful industry cycles, many more earned their spot in the BW 50 as innovators.
  • Usmma - tms 2013 4 22-13 - 1425

    1. 1. Ed RichardsonPresidentUSMMATechnology Metals Summit 2013
    2. 2. 2013 ©Magnet Development
    3. 3. 2013 ©Permanent Magnets Available TodayAlnico FerritesSamariumCobaltNeodymiumIronBoronHighestTemperatureLowest CostHighestMaximumEnergy ProductHigh Temp /High MaxEnergy Product
    4. 4. 2013 ©Permanent Magnets Available TodayAlnico FerritesSamariumCobaltNeodymiumIronBoronGenerally Considered “High Performance”HighestTemperatureLowest CostHighestMaximumEnergy ProductHigh Temp /High MaxEnergy Product
    5. 5. 2013 ©Who Produces Them in the U.S.?• Alnico Magnets▫ Thomas & Skinner Indianapolis, IN 170 employees▫ Permanent Magnetic Corporation Indianapolis, IN 50 employees▫ Arnold Magnetic Technologies Marengo, IL 140 employees• Samarium-Cobalt▫ Electron Energy Corporation Landisville, PA 100 employees• Hard Ferrites▫ Hoosier Magnetics, Inc. (ferritepowder) Ogdensburg, NY 50 employees• Neodymium-Iron-Boron▫ Hitachi Metals (planned) China Grove, NC 130 employees
    6. 6. 2013 ©How They Are Made: CastingPour moltenmetal into molds Heat treat Grinding Inspection
    7. 7. 2013 ©How They Are Made: SinteringCast Alloy & Crush Press Powder SinterHeat TreatGrindingInspection
    8. 8. 2013 ©High-Performance Magnets: Commercial Use• Aerospace▫ Motors▫ Sensors▫ Switches• Medical▫ Transducers• Industrial▫ Motors/generators▫ Guitar pickups▫ Instrumentation• Oil and Gas Exploration▫ SensorsAerospace Industrial Oil Exploration Medical
    9. 9. 2013 ©High-Performance Magnets: Military UseAGM-114 “Hellfire”Excalibur Artillery Shell JDAM AssemblyF-22A RaptorAIM-9XPhalanx CIWSAESA RadarsBlack Hawk Helicopter
    10. 10. 2013 ©Military Requirement for Domestic Sources:Some, Not AllHard (Permanent) Magnets Soft Magnetic Materials• Four general types:▫ Alnico▫ SmCo (Rare Earth)▫ NdFeB (Rare Earth)▫ Hard Ferrites• Multiple types, including:▫ Electrical Steel▫ Powdered Iron▫ Soft Ferrites
    11. 11. 2013 ©Why Do We Need A Secure Supply?• Vietnam War▫ Sony withheld cameras used to guide tactical missiles• 1983▫ Socialists in the Japanese Diet blocked the sale of ceramicpackaging used in U.S. cruise missiles• 2002▫ Hellfire Missile production stopped during West Coast dock strike Critical parts sourced in Japan were awaiting off-loading• 2003▫ JDAM bomb production stopped during Iraq war because SwatchGroup refused to ship critical part Disagreed w/ Bush Administration foreign policy
    12. 12. 2013 ©Why Do We Need A Secure Supply?• Critical to our economy▫ Innovation is a key trait of the companies listed in theBusiness Week 50, an annual ranking of the top-performing companies in America• Critical to a strong military▫ Weapons systems typically built with new, innovativetechnology and materials“Innovation remains a powerful engine of success”
    13. 13. 2013 ©Case study: NdFeB Magnets and Innovation• “Offshoring technology innovation: A case study ofrare-earth technology,” Fifarek, Veloso and Davidson, Journal ofOperations Management, Vol. 26, 2008▫ Shows that once the domestic bonded neo magnet industrywent to China, innovation by US industry involving bondedneo magnets decreased dramatically.▫ Number of patents involving bonded neo magnets droppedprecipitously.Without the ability to manufacture,we lose the ability to innovate.
    14. 14. 2013 ©U.S. Production is Vital• Develop unique materials for mission specific DODrequirements, U.S. market needs, AND commercialize.• Interest and ability to work with high performance,small production runs.• China has become a critical US defense supplier.
    15. 15. 2013 ©Summary• U.S. magnetic materials industry is alive.• 10 U.S.C. 2533b “Specialty Metals Clause” applies to the high performancemagnets.• High performance magnets are strategic materials in high-profile legacy andemerging weapon systems.• U.S. defense supply chain needs domestic, advanced, and specialized magnettechnology capabilities for unique military requirements.• Supply Chain Security works for the Defense Department• The US military should not become dependent on China for its defensesystemsAbility to manufacture = ability to innovate
    16. 16. 2013 ©Questions?Ed RichardsonPresidentUSMMA(317) 923-2501enr@usmagneticmaterials.comwww.usmagneticmaterials.com
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×