Gathering Information
* Design research is often used at the early stages or 
conception of a project. However certain methods can 
be used at l...
Enthnographic Research
The purpose of user research is to gain a thorough 
understanding of users. Its serves to unlock th...
Note: Qualitative methods are not statistically 
focused and will not determine
“average” behaviors/attitudes or answer
qu...
Who
        ?
What
        ?
Where
        ?
When
        ?
Why
        ?
Methods of Gathering User Information

                      Participation Observation



    Text messages

             ...
In  participant  observation  studies  the 
    researcher  spends  time  observing  and 
    recording  the  behaviour  o...
Encouraging  participants  in  a  study  to  send 
text  messages  describing  or  recording  events, 
actions or thoughts...
Activity diaries are an inexpensive method of 
gaining an insight into the everyday use of 
products and the associated ha...
Interviewing the user, particularly after 
conducting other user centred research 
studies, can be beneficial in understan...
Empathy tools assist in finding out not just 
what people are saying and doing, but also 
what they are thinking and feeli...
The ‘mobilistrictor’ mobility restricting body 
suit simulates the effects of old age. It enables 
designers, who may be f...
© Gadget Show, 2006
                      © www.mobilistrictor.com




© Gadget Show, 2006
Using  scenarios,  props  and  costumes  to  assist 
in  'character  building'  and  furniture 
arrangement  to  represent...
The  Consumer  Vision  System,  developed  by 
 Kimberly  Clark,  is  a  research  tool  which  enables 
 designers to see...
Discreet observation is a method of identifying 
real  design  needs  by  discreetly  observing 
people  interacting  with...
© Loughborough University, 2007
                                  © Loughborough University, 2007
User  trials,  sometimes  called  task  analysis 
exercises,  are  simulations  of  product  usage  in 
which  subjects  a...
Product‐in‐Use  is  an  interactive,  naturalistic, 
observational  method  designed  to  "capture 
peoples’ behaviour  in...
Focus  groups  create  a  format  which  brings 
together  a  selection  of  participants  to 
contribute  in  a  two  way...
© Loughborough University, 2006




© Cranfield University, 2003
Cultural  probes  are  one  way  to  access 
environments  that  are  difficult  to  observe 
directly and also to capture...
cultural probes
Personas are visual and anecdotal profiles. They may 
be based on ‘real people’ from research or they may 
have been ‘made...
http://www.ideo.com/images/uploads/work/case-
studies/pdfs/IDEO_HCD_ToolKit_Complete_for_Download.
pdf
The Science Bit 
Anthropometry
Body Sizes
Strength
Dexterity
Flex/Twist Measurements
Angles of tilt
Limits to Movement
Abilities/ Disabilit...
Organising information 
User Experience Information Gathering  Methods
User Experience Information Gathering  Methods
User Experience Information Gathering  Methods
User Experience Information Gathering  Methods
User Experience Information Gathering  Methods
User Experience Information Gathering  Methods
User Experience Information Gathering  Methods
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

User Experience Information Gathering Methods

3,841 views
3,666 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,841
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
32
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
87
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

User Experience Information Gathering Methods

  1. 1. Gathering Information
  2. 2. * Design research is often used at the early stages or  conception of a project. However certain methods can  be used at later stages for testing and verifying. Design  research is made up of a number of different user  research methods. *Engine Service Design  * * Qualitative research methods enable the design team to develop deep empathy for people they are designing for, to question assumptions, and to inspire new solutions. At the early stages of the process, research is generative — used to inspire imagination and inform intuition about new opportunities and ideas. In later phases, these methods can be evaluative—used to learn quickly about people’s response to ideas and proposed solutions. ** IDEO HCD Toolkit
  3. 3. Enthnographic Research The purpose of user research is to gain a thorough  understanding of users. Its serves to unlock the  reasons why users do the things they do (drivers), the  reasons why they don’t do things (hurdles). It also  seeks to uncover and understand their lifestyles,  behaviours and attitudes. In design the journeys users  take are important, the moods they are in and the  modes they adopt.  Qualitative methods can uncover deeply held, needs,  desires, and aspirations. ‘Ethnographic studies are holistic, founded on the idea  that humans are best understood in the fullest possible  context’* * www.wikipedia.com
  4. 4. Note: Qualitative methods are not statistically  focused and will not determine “average” behaviors/attitudes or answer questions such as: “Are people in X region more likely to do this than in Y region?” This is because qualitative methods do not cover a sample large enough to be statistically significant.
  5. 5. Who ? What ? Where ? When ? Why ?
  6. 6. Methods of Gathering User Information Participation Observation Text messages Customer diaries/ Probes Interviews  Focus Groups Empathy Product in Use Scenarios of Use Discreet Observations User trials
  7. 7. In  participant  observation  studies  the  researcher  spends  time  observing  and  recording  the  behaviour  of  an  individual  or  group,  "listening  to  their  interactions  and  immersing  him/herself  in  the  context  of  the  participant’s daily life“* *Naked Eye Research (2007) Video ethnography, http://www.naked‐eye‐research.co.uk/tech.html (accessed January 2008) participant     observation 
  8. 8. Encouraging  participants  in  a  study  to  send  text  messages  describing  or  recording  events,  actions or thoughts allows for immediate, real  feedback. text messages
  9. 9. Activity diaries are an inexpensive method of  gaining an insight into the everyday use of  products and the associated habits,  behaviours, problems and difficulties. They are  especially useful for evaluating existing  products and practices in "situations where  researchers find it difficult to observe  customers first hand" *"and within contexts  where it would be inappropriate for an  ethnographer to do so“** *Evans, S., Burns, A. and Barrett, R. (2002) Empathic Design Tutor, Cranfield, IERC, Cranfield University,  UK ** Naked Eye Research (2007) Video Diaries, http://www.naked‐eye‐research.co.uk/tech.html (accessed  May 2008) customer diaries
  10. 10. Interviewing the user, particularly after  conducting other user centred research  studies, can be beneficial in understanding  their perceptions of situations, behaviours,  products or services. Using prompts can help  in interviews. interviews
  11. 11. Empathy tools assist in finding out not just  what people are saying and doing, but also  what they are thinking and feeling. They offer  an opportunity to really understand the  limitations of certain users. Empathy
  12. 12. The ‘mobilistrictor’ mobility restricting body  suit simulates the effects of old age. It enables  designers, who may be fully fit and active, to  empathise with older people and assess how  their designs work in practice for people with  some loss of mobility or declining sensory  perception Mobilistrictor
  13. 13. © Gadget Show, 2006 © www.mobilistrictor.com © Gadget Show, 2006
  14. 14. Using  scenarios,  props  and  costumes  to  assist  in  'character  building'  and  furniture  arrangement  to  represent  the  product  environment,  ‘Scenario‐of‐Use’ aims  to  uncover  previously  unvoiced  needs  using  role  play as a cue for recall scenario building
  15. 15. The  Consumer  Vision  System,  developed  by  Kimberly  Clark,  is  a  research  tool  which  enables  designers to see products through the  consumers  eyes.  * www.kimberlyclarke.com accessed May 2008 consumer vision system
  16. 16. Discreet observation is a method of identifying  real  design  needs  by  discreetly  observing  people  interacting  with  people  and  objects  in  public spaces. discreet observations
  17. 17. © Loughborough University, 2007 © Loughborough University, 2007
  18. 18. User  trials,  sometimes  called  task  analysis  exercises,  are  simulations  of  product  usage  in  which  subjects  are  asked  to  fulfil  specified  tasks using a product or product simulation.*  * Vermeeren, A. P. O. S. (1999) Designing Scenarios and Tasks for User Trials of Home Electronic Devices,  In: Green. W.S and Jordan P.W (1999) Human Factors in Product Design: Current Practice and Future  Trends, Taylor and Francis, London, pp. 47‐55. user trials
  19. 19. Product‐in‐Use  is  an  interactive,  naturalistic,  observational  method  designed  to  "capture  peoples’ behaviour  in  real‐life  contexts"  providing  an  "account  of  the  behaviour  surrounding a product or activity" * * Evans, S., Burns, A. and Barrett, R. (2002) Empathic Design Tutor, Cranfield, IERC, Cranfield University, UK product‐in‐use
  20. 20. Focus  groups  create  a  format  which  brings  together  a  selection  of  participants  to  contribute  in  a  two  way  debate  on  a  particular  issue  whilst  allowing  the  researcher  to  investigate  and  identify  group  norms and explore conflicting views *. Focus  groups  can  be  useful  at  various  stages  of  a  project, to establish user needs, test product  designs and evaluate final concepts. * May, T. (2001) Social Research: Issues, methods and process, Open University Press, Buckingham. focus groups
  21. 21. © Loughborough University, 2006 © Cranfield University, 2003
  22. 22. Cultural  probes  are  one  way  to  access  environments  that  are  difficult  to  observe  directly and also to capture more of this 'felt  life‘*.  Users  are  given  packs  containing  recording  devices  designed  to  stimulate  thought  as  well  as  capture  experiences  and  asked to record their activities over a period  of  time.  The  information  is  real  and  experiental.  This  method  is  useful  at  the  initial  stage  of  a  project  in  an  effort  to  identify  opportunities  and  gain  a  deeper  understanding of behaviour. *http://www.hcibook.com/e3/casestudy/cultural-probes/. cultural probes
  23. 23. cultural probes
  24. 24. Personas are visual and anecdotal profiles. They may  be based on ‘real people’ from research or they may  have been ‘made‐up’ in a brainstorm session. By  profile it means specific information about the person  that is illustrative and useful to the project ‐ it should  identify the key characteristics of the person. Posing  questions and answering them as the persona  character is often helpful to build up a character ‐ quirky or unusual questions are often more insightful.  Very useful at the early stages of a project and  through the idea generation and evaluation. personas
  25. 25. http://www.ideo.com/images/uploads/work/case- studies/pdfs/IDEO_HCD_ToolKit_Complete_for_Download. pdf
  26. 26. The Science Bit 
  27. 27. Anthropometry Body Sizes Strength Dexterity Flex/Twist Measurements Angles of tilt Limits to Movement Abilities/ Disabilities Weight………………
  28. 28. Organising information 

×