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Naming Brands

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Session Description: …

Session Description:

Most think naming a baby is pretty hard. It is! Unlike naming babies, naming brands brings much more complexity to the process. Companies must consider market position, trademark and domain availability, personality of the product, ability to work with a visual system, and much, much more.As author of Merriam’s Guide to Naming and as an expert who has worked with Fortune 500 multinationals and fast-growth entrepreneurial companies, I will help you get past the frustration and avoid the pitfalls. This webinar will show you how to give birth to a great brand name.

Learning Points:

what makes a name good or bad for your brand
how names fit with your existing name architecture
trends and different types of names
resources for finding name ideas
common pitfalls and names to avoid
the evaluation process–how to pick a good brand name

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  • Nivea is an arctic owl and an orchidStarbucks is a character in Moby DickIkea: Ingvar Kamprad, Elmtaryd, Agunnaryd
  • Transcript

    • 1. Naming BrandsSeptember 29, 2012
    • 2. Working with companies large and smallIn 15 years, have seen both success and failure 2
    • 3. Discovered what does and doesn’t work in creatingbrand namesMerriam’s Guide to Naming published in 2009. 3
    • 4. The key lessons:What makes a successful name?How do you go about finding a successful name?How do you evaluate your options?How does your name work with other names? 4
    • 5. The key lessons:What makes a successful name?How do you go about finding a successful name?How do you evaluate your options?How does your name work with other names? 5
    • 6. First—the brand name isn’t THAT importantRare is the company that failed because of its name.Successful companies have can have bad names:• Ebay• CA• Putzmeister• AFLAC I worked with a client who put so much emphasis on the name that they wasted• Saucony months agonizing over the options. That• Boehringer Ingelheim was in 2006. They still haven’t got a name.• H. E. Butt The company never got started. 6
    • 7. The name is only part of the brandBrand elements:NameLogoTaglinePersonalityColorsTypographySoundSupport GraphicsImagery 7
    • 8. Coca-Cola: The name is only the beginning 8
    • 9. Name doesn’t define a business or encapsulate apositioningThese brands don’t define or position cookies, coffees, skincare products,routers or online auctions One client insisted on an “upscale” name like “Pottery Barn.” + = $$$$ 9
    • 10. Common advice that is bad advice: Short 10
    • 11. Common advice that is bad advice: Easy to spell 11
    • 12. Common advice that is bad advice: Memorable 12
    • 13. Practical advice for strong names: Unusual vs. 13
    • 14. Practical advice for strong names: Distinctive 14
    • 15. Practical advice for strong names: Search enginefriendly 15
    • 16. Practical advice for strong names: Meaningful vs. 16
    • 17. Practical advice for strong names: Vivid and evocative 17
    • 18. Practical advice for strong names: Ownable Preliminary searches are free and easy with the USPTO’s TESS: http://tess2.uspto.gov 18
    • 19. The key lessons:What makes a successful name?How do you go about finding a successful name?How do you evaluate your options?How does your name work with other names? 19
    • 20. What doesn’t work 20
    • 21. Process overview Preparation Discovery Evaluation Review naming imperatives Develop 200 name candidates Not applicable for this project (strategic and stylistic) Recommend 15 best options Logo design available upon Review competitive Clear top 15 through TESS and request issues, practices, naming Network solutions for Package design available upon conventions availability request Positioning, service details, benefits Understand usage environment (how and where name will be used) Description of customers and other key audiences
    • 22. Preparation: Creative briefWhat makes your product/company truly different?Describe your product—boil it down to one sentence, then three wordsWhat one thing will your brand stand for?What do you think about when you think about your brand? Personality?Where will name be used?Will name be used withother names? We are working on the brand strategy after we figure out our brand name. WeDescribe the customer can tell you are going to stand for integrity,Describe competitors . quality, value, service and outstanding performance. 22
    • 23. Name generation process What it’s called How many What it represents Master list 100-250 The “potentials” Screening list 25 The best options ready for screening Short list 10-15 The “possibles” to go into marketing and top level availability screening Candidate list 2-3 The “probables” for full infringement search Final name 23
    • 24. Naming is not about creating, but finding Not this THIS 24
    • 25. Consider a mood board Dogleg Orchards Ghost Tree Farm Berry Basket 25
    • 26. Finding technique: Trying different types of namesAcronym Alliteration/RhymeAmalgam AppropriationDescriptive Evocative 26
    • 27. Finding technique: Trying different types of namesNeologism NicknameForeign Word InitialsFounder Ingredient 27
    • 28. Finding technique: Trying different types of namesGeography Humor/SlangMerged MimeticsPersonification Onomatopoeia Clever Statement 28
    • 29. Other places to look• www.Thesaurus.com• www.RhymeZone.com• www.MoreWords.com• www.Babylon.com• www.OnlineSlangDictionary.com• www.aphorisms.com• www.ThinkExist.com 29
    • 30. The key lessons:What makes a successful name?How do you go about finding a successful name?How do you evaluate your options?How does your name work with other names? 30
    • 31. Evaluating: Ways to fail“I’m not sure I like these ideas.”“I’ll know it when I see it.”“Let’s vote on our favorites.”“I want a name that Our name needs to explain our product is made of synthetic engineered oil, that itconveys my positioning.” offers ultimate wear protection, and that it allows for the smoothest operation of your engine, and that it is premium priced. It has to work in 24 languages and be 8 letters or less. 31
    • 32. Evaluating: The better way 1. Get outside opinions 2. Find the instant associations 32
    • 33. Evaluating: Can you own it?Can you buy the URL?Can you use it on social media?Can you get a trademark? 33
    • 34. The key lessons:What makes a successful name?How do you go about finding a successful name?How do you evaluate your options?How does your name work with other names? 34
    • 35. Brand names working with other brand names:Brand architectureBrand architecture: The organizing structure that specifies thetype, number, relationship and purpose of brands within your brand portfolio1. How does my company brand relate to my product brands? How do they relate to one another? What is the best role for the company brand?2. Are sub-brands and brand extensions the way to go? What are the options?3. Do I have true brands that are delivering value to my company or do I have a collection of names? How can I tell which is which?4. How many brands does my company need? What brands are strategically valuable and worthy of continued investment?5. What drives consumer preferences? How do my customers buy?6. What are the pros and cons of my current brand portfolio structure? How will future decisions impact it?7. Would a change in my architecture give me an opportunity to dominate a market segment? 35
    • 36. Brand architecture options:Unitary structure 36
    • 37. Brand architecture options:Multiple unrelated brands 37
    • 38. Brand architecture options:Hybrid structure 38
    • 39. The best brand architecture structure?Depends on strategic considerations 39
    • 40. The best brand architecture structure?Depends on strategic considerations 40
    • 41. Many companies have a formal process for decidingwhat things get a name brand: Example 3M 41
    • 42. Further reading“The Name Game,” Salon, http://www.salon.com/1999/11/30/naming/“The Science of Naming Brands,” TheAtlantic, http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2011/05/the-science-of-naming-brands-from-ipad-to-ice-cream/238820/“Brand Naming,” FastCompany, http://www.fastcompany.com/resources/marketing/post/060605.html“The Problem with Bad Product Names,” Engadget.comhttp://www.engadget.com/2011/11/11/editorial-the-problem-with-bad-product-names-and-what-we-can-le/“8 Principles of Product Naming,” FastCompany, http://www.fastcompany.com/1819418/the-8-principles-of-product-naming 42
    • 43. Thank you!