Problem Gambling and Oregon Youth:A Growing Concern…and What Parents              Can Do           Oregon Health Authority...
Which of these is gambling?         Poker games with friends    Playing poker online for no money           Going to the c...
Betting money or something of  value on an event where the   outcome is determined by      chance is gambling.
Problem or Not? Telling the Difference SOCIAL GAMBLING       PROBLEM GAMBLING                         Frequent, or spends ...
Gambling in Oregon is growing
Americans gamble more eachyear than they spend ongroceries ($900B+ annually)
A casino in every home? Inevery pocket?
Oregon Gambling:                                    SummarizedOregon has more forms of legalized gambling andoffers easier...
Indicators of problem gambling1.     Too much time spent gambling2.     Betting more and more money3.     Creating special...
More indicators 8.    Gambling when there is a crisis 9.    Stopping non-gambling activities and interests 10.   Frequentl...
O OK ED               Hlike other “addictions” Brain is affected   Tolerance develops       Loss of control      …but hard...
Youth Gambling Is Risky Business!                          Gambling is                          everywhere                ...
….where’s the balance?
Adolescent Brains Are A Work        In Progress• Prefer new, exciting, low  effort activities• Don’t consider  negative co...
…that’s 1 per classroom, yetit’s not addressed in
Oregon youth gambling prevalenceEver gambled: 63%At risk: 4.6%Problem: 1.3%
2012 Gambling, Substance Use and Mental Health among                                       Oregon Youth             50%   ...
2012 Binge Drank in the Past 30 Days             50%             40%Percentage             30%                            ...
2012 Smoked Cigarettes in the Past 30 Days             50%             40%Percentage             30%                      ...
2012 Used Marijuana in the Past 30 Days             50%             40%Percentage             30%                         ...
2012 Skipped School 1 or More Days in the Past 30 Days             50%             40%Percentage             30%          ...
Gambling activities among Oregon youth(2012 SWS)1. Betting on games of personal skill2. Sports betting3. Other (betting on...
Risk & Protective Factors RISK FACTORS               PROTECTIVE FACTORS poor parenting                            strong...
Family income below medianSingle parent householdMaleStarted gambling before 8th gradeCards and sports bettorsPlay s...
Alternative high schoolsSchool counselorsAt risk youth programsYouth detention facilitiesAdolescent addiction treatme...
Internet gambling is a growing concern • Illegal • Available 24/7 • Accelerated rate of play distorts perceptions of real ...
twice as likely to have a child who is an at riskgamblerfour times as likely to have a child who is aproblem gambler
Parental attitudes All parents in the groups said their kids didn’t  gamble All kids in the groups said they did gamble ...
Most parents believe:Youth gambling is harmlessYouth who gamble are unlikely to have problems in schoolYouth gambling i...
sexual             behaviordrinking            Problem           Behaviors    smoking  gambling                 drug      ...
What Parents Can Do(Handout)Talk to your kids aboutthe risks of gamblingjust like you would anyother risk behavior…gobeyon...
Resources
www.problemgamblingprevention.org
Quick “consumer education” activity:What Are the Odds??
Odds of winning $100 inPowerball   … are about 11 thousand to 1…but   what does that mean??
Let’s say there is 1 piece of red popcorn in thisbag of 10,000 pieces of white popcorn                         ….you would...
Chances of winning the big prize?146 million to 1…what does that mean??
would be like finding the one piece of redpopcorn in 14,600 bags like this
Problem Gambling  - For Parents of High Risk Youth
Problem Gambling  - For Parents of High Risk Youth
Problem Gambling  - For Parents of High Risk Youth
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Problem Gambling - For Parents of High Risk Youth

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  • Welcome to the Problem Gambling Prevention 101 E-Learning Course. This course will provide an overview of problem gambling, both nationally and locally, discuss problem gambling in specific populations, and bring awareness about available resources. This course is designed for professionals as well as community members. The training is approximately one-and-a-half hours in length and has been designed to have interactive elements, and opportunities to check your learning as you progress.
  • Which of these activities would you consider gambling? That’s right . . . They’re all forms of gambling, whether one dabbles in the stock market or goes to a casino, they’re gambling. In fact, let’s take a look at a formal definition of gambling . . .
  • Gambling is a risk, by definition. It’s harmless for most people. Entertainment. For some, however, gambling’s more than that. It’s an addiction every bit as destructive as an addiction to any substance.
  • How would you decide if you, or someone you know, has a problem with gambling? Is it done socially, just for fun? Or is it more than that? Consider the differences between social gambling and problem gambling. To a problem gambler, day-to-day existence involves gambling . . . borrowing money because resources have been exhausted, selling personal belongings to finance gambling . . . lying, cheating, or stealing to ensure the continuation of gambling, are all examples of problem gambling behavior.
  • How much has gambling become part of Oregon’s landscape, culture and economy? Spirit Mountain Casino is Oregon’s number one tourist attraction, surpassing Multnomah Falls, Crater Lake, and other Oregon icons. And, each year the state depends on the millions of dollars generated by its lottery.
  • You may be surprised to learn that Americans spend more on gambling, each year, than they spend on groceries. $900 Billion. In Oregon, 64.5% of all Oregonians have gambled ( in the last year)
  • We’ve touched on the ever increasing accessibility of gaming . . . From venues built specifically for gambling activity, to grocery stores and bars . . . To your own home. Internet gaming can be played on your laptop, desktop, and even the phone. How many middle and high-school aged kids that have cell phones are aware of the potential risks associated with gambling? Something to think about . . .are we headed towards a new generation of addictive behavior?
  • Oregon is no slouch when it comes to gambling. We offer more forms of legalized gaming, and easier access, than all other states, with the exception of Nevada and New Jersey. Even with all that opportunity, Oregon is a nationally recognized leader in prevention of, and treatment for, gambling problems.
  • So far we’ve discussed what problem gambling is, its effects and costs. Now let’s talk a little about who is at risk. This graph shows the rates of problem gambling by age. College (age) students carry the highest prevalence rate. We’ll discuss why a bit later.
  • Let’s review . . . take a look at some signs of problem gambling
  • Problem gambling changes a person—what they value, their time and attention changes and narrows to just gambling. The rush felt with the first “big win,” can get someone really hooked. Some will develop a tolerance and need to spend more time/money to get that rush . . . or high. Doesn’t that sound just like someone who’s addicted to alcohol or drugs? The process is the same.
  • The physiological process of an addiction is demonstrated by looking at a brain of a gambler. The top image is the brain of someone gambling . . . the bottom image is of a cocaine user . . . notice how parts of the brain “light up” in anticipation of gambling, just like it does when it anticipates a drug.
  • Youth gambling is on the rise, and is a major concern. This is really the first generation to grow up surrounded by gambling opportunities. For them, gambling is the norm, not the exception . . .
  • Our kids are exposed to an endless barrage of pro-gambling messages and images . . . Gambling is glamorous and can be done in church, or at school, and can make you a millionaire without working. It’s even considered a sport on ESPN! We get the message . . . But who’s talking to kids about the potential risks of gambling? Very few . . . and that’s why every voice counts. More information means more informed decisions.
  • Remember how we’ve talked about gambling’s effect on the brain? Well, the developing brain of an adolescent is the perfect environment in which gambling can take hold...if you look at what the adolescent brain likes, you’re looking at the qualities of gambling
  • In Oregon we know that, already, about one youth per classroom has a diagnosable gambling problem . . . yet teachers, parents and others will frequently say “we just don’t see it”
  • But it’s there . . .Oregon data confirm that the majority of kids have gambled . . . and almost 5% of them are on their way to developing a problem. Some are already there.
  • Consider the risk and protective factors associated with substance abuse. The same factors apply to those associated with problem gambling . . . the same strategies and interventions apply, too. Incorporating problem gambling prevention in existing efforts can be as simple as mentioning gambling when you’re talking about other risk behaviors. Gambling-specific curricula and interventions, are available from the State Problem Gambling Services office.
  • Here are some characteristics associated with kids at highest risk for developing gambling problems. These represent many of the same risks shared by kids who are likely to develop alcohol or drug problems. The same process is at work here for gambling as it is for substances. Gambling needs to be treated in the same way and included in prevention education efforts.
  • . . . and the opportunities to gamble are getting greater all the time. Should we be concerned about the emergence of online gambling and its attraction for youth?
  • Just as it is with alcohol and other drugs, parents who gamble are more likely to have kids who gamble.
  • Recent focus groups held in Oregon revealed an interesting connection . . . Or disconnection. Kids, in one room, were talking about their gambling, while their parents were in another room saying how their kids didn’t gamble! Would we see this disconnect if the subject was alcohol? Educating parents is a key strategy for us to use.
  • Gambling is completely harmless . . . A belief many parents share.
  • So, again, we need to bring gambling into the prevention conversation at every opportunity because kids . . . are . . . gambling. The same prevention strategies and techniques work, as long as gambling is included in the conversation. Adding a handout, some PowerPoint slides, or a web link, to existing prevention efforts will go a long way towards helping kids stay healthy. Many resources have already been developed . . . And they’re free.
  • This section looks at resources. Ones you need to know about . . . And use!
  • The best one-stop-shopping resource for problem gambling prevention is our very extensive website . . . go to problemgamblingprevention.org, and discover the many treasures offered. Everything from camera ready handouts to ready-to-use PowerPoint shows, videos, radio ads, and more. Content is updated regularly, and we encourage you to spend 10 minutes clicking around in this website. It’s worth it, we promise!
  • Many seeking problem gambling treatment begin by calling the Oregon Problem Gambling Helpline. This service includes a traditional helpline with call-back or follow-up services, an interactive web presence where people can engage in live chat with a helpline counselor, and have the opportunity to view video testimonials for (by or from?) people in recovery.
  • Problem Gambling - For Parents of High Risk Youth

    1. 1. Problem Gambling and Oregon Youth:A Growing Concern…and What Parents Can Do Oregon Health Authority Addictions and Mental Health Division Problem Gambling Services
    2. 2. Which of these is gambling? Poker games with friends Playing poker online for no money Going to the casino Church bingo Fundraiser raffle Day trading in the stock market
    3. 3. Betting money or something of value on an event where the outcome is determined by chance is gambling.
    4. 4. Problem or Not? Telling the Difference SOCIAL GAMBLING PROBLEM GAMBLING Frequent, or spends Occasional gambler. more time gambling.Sticks to limits of Plays with $ that ismoney to play with. needed or borrowed. Expects to win; keepsHopes to win but playing to win backexpects to lose. losses.Can take it or Is revolved aroundleave it. gambling.
    5. 5. Gambling in Oregon is growing
    6. 6. Americans gamble more eachyear than they spend ongroceries ($900B+ annually)
    7. 7. A casino in every home? Inevery pocket?
    8. 8. Oregon Gambling: SummarizedOregon has more forms of legalized gambling andoffers easier access to gambling than almost anyother state Source: National Ctr for the Study of Gambling, 2006
    9. 9. Indicators of problem gambling1. Too much time spent gambling2. Betting more and more money3. Creating special occasions for gambling4. Increasing intensity of interest in gambling5. Boasting about winning; evasive about losing6. Exaggerated displays of money and other possessions Note: Click to see the rest of the list.
    10. 10. More indicators 8. Gambling when there is a crisis 9. Stopping non-gambling activities and interests 10. Frequently absent from work/home/school 11. Excessive phone use 12. Withdrawing from family 13. Personality changes 14. Spending money on gambling that was earmarked for other purposesNote: No audio for this slide. Click to move to the next slide.
    11. 11. O OK ED Hlike other “addictions” Brain is affected Tolerance develops Loss of control …but harder to detect
    12. 12. Youth Gambling Is Risky Business! Gambling is everywhere This is the first generation to grow up with gambling as the norm and seen as harmless fun
    13. 13. ….where’s the balance?
    14. 14. Adolescent Brains Are A Work In Progress• Prefer new, exciting, low effort activities• Don’t consider negative consequences• More risky, impulsive
    15. 15. …that’s 1 per classroom, yetit’s not addressed in
    16. 16. Oregon youth gambling prevalenceEver gambled: 63%At risk: 4.6%Problem: 1.3%
    17. 17. 2012 Gambling, Substance Use and Mental Health among Oregon Youth 50% 40% 6th 8thPercentage 30% 11th 20% 10% 0% Gambling Alcohol Binge Marijuana Cigarettes Depression Psych Alcohol distress
    18. 18. 2012 Binge Drank in the Past 30 Days 50% 40%Percentage 30% Gambled 20% Did not Gamble 10% 0% 6th 8th 11th Grade
    19. 19. 2012 Smoked Cigarettes in the Past 30 Days 50% 40%Percentage 30% Gambled 20% Did not Gamble 10% 0% 6th 8th 11th Grade
    20. 20. 2012 Used Marijuana in the Past 30 Days 50% 40%Percentage 30% Gambled 20% Did not Gamble 10% 0% 6th 8th 11th Grade
    21. 21. 2012 Skipped School 1 or More Days in the Past 30 Days 50% 40%Percentage 30% Gambled 20% Did not Gamble 10% 0% 6th 8th 11th Grade
    22. 22. Gambling activities among Oregon youth(2012 SWS)1. Betting on games of personal skill2. Sports betting3. Other (betting on fantasy football/basketball/baseball teams?)4. Poker5. Dice/coin flips6. Lottery tickets7. Internet8. Bingo
    23. 23. Risk & Protective Factors RISK FACTORS PROTECTIVE FACTORS poor parenting strong family bonds school failure clear rules of conduct pro-use community parental involvement norms and monitoring affiliation with peers strong bonds with exhibiting behavior school, community availability/access moderation norms
    24. 24. Family income below medianSingle parent householdMaleStarted gambling before 8th gradeCards and sports bettorsPlay sports for their schoolsFamily members gambleGamble with friends/acquaintances
    25. 25. Alternative high schoolsSchool counselorsAt risk youth programsYouth detention facilitiesAdolescent addiction treatmentSchool sports
    26. 26. Internet gambling is a growing concern • Illegal • Available 24/7 • Accelerated rate of play distorts perceptions of real money • “Practice” sites lure players via higher payoffs
    27. 27. twice as likely to have a child who is an at riskgamblerfour times as likely to have a child who is aproblem gambler
    28. 28. Parental attitudes All parents in the groups said their kids didn’t gamble All kids in the groups said they did gamble Neither sees gambling as risky
    29. 29. Most parents believe:Youth gambling is harmlessYouth who gamble are unlikely to have problems in schoolYouth gambling is not associated with alcohol or drug use …and those beliefs are part of the problem
    30. 30. sexual behaviordrinking Problem Behaviors smoking gambling drug use
    31. 31. What Parents Can Do(Handout)Talk to your kids aboutthe risks of gamblingjust like you would anyother risk behavior…gobeyond the risk of losingmoney and talk aboutthe risk of addictionModel appropriatebehavior (if you gamble,stick to limits of timeand money)Watch for warning signsof a problem andintervene
    32. 32. Resources
    33. 33. www.problemgamblingprevention.org
    34. 34. Quick “consumer education” activity:What Are the Odds??
    35. 35. Odds of winning $100 inPowerball … are about 11 thousand to 1…but what does that mean??
    36. 36. Let’s say there is 1 piece of red popcorn in thisbag of 10,000 pieces of white popcorn ….you would have a better chance of finding the one red kernel of popcorn in this bag than you would of winning $100 on a powerball ticket
    37. 37. Chances of winning the big prize?146 million to 1…what does that mean??
    38. 38. would be like finding the one piece of redpopcorn in 14,600 bags like this
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