Youth gambling online: myths, realities and new understandings
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Youth gambling online: myths, realities and new understandings

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Dr Jeffrey Derevensky, Professor of Psychiatry and Director, International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems and High-Risk Behaviors, Canada ...

Dr Jeffrey Derevensky, Professor of Psychiatry and Director, International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems and High-Risk Behaviors, Canada

Presentation given at:
The New Game: Emerging technology and responsible gambling

This forum was hosted by the Victorian Government's Office of Gaming and Racing on 23 May 2011, as part of Responsible Gambling Awareness Week.

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  • Even if people do not have a computer there is cheap access in abundant Internet cafes, and free access in many public libraries and colleges and universities It’s used for research, for entertainment, to meet people
  • Even if people do not have a computer there is cheap access in abundant Internet cafes, and free access in many public libraries and colleges and universities It’s used for research, for entertainment, to meet people
  • I came on board with this study in October High school and some college had been collected, Bruce at Casino City agreed to come on board Data is preliminary, study is ongoing But it provides us with some interesting info High-school students: 47% male, 53% female College/University: 39% male, 61% female Internet 18-24: 90% male, 10% female (N=58) Internet 25+: 65% male, 35% female Overall Internet: 68% male, 32% female
  • High school: total sample, 56% have played on practice sites 48% are male and 52% are female BUT 57% of males and 55% of females play, tho’ there is no significant difference, they are playing equally College/University sample: 43% have played on practice sites 44% are males, 56% are females BUT 49% of males and 40% of females, p<0.01 Internet sample 18-24: 72% have played 86% male, 14% female BUT 69% of males and 100% of females, can’t determine sig cuz of sample size Internet sample 25+: 78% have played on practice sites 64% are male, 36% female BUT 76% of males and 81% of females have played, tho’ not sig, they are playing equally Whole Internet sample: 78% have played 66% are male, 34% are female BUT 75% of males have played, 82% of females have played, no sig difference
  • High-School: 13% of males, 6% of females AND 68% are male, 32% are female, p<.001
  • This slide is to emphasise that the majority of high-school and university kids are not gambling on the internet, but for those that do 3% of high-school and 1% of college kids do at least weekly For the Internet sample, those who gamble for money, by far the most are doing so weekly Of males, 72% are gambling weekly, of females 54% are gambling weekly, p<.05
  • Just over 10% of high-school students meet criteria for problem gambling (endorsing 2 or more items on DSM-IV-J) Just over 20% of Internet sample meet criteria for problem gambling (endorsing 3 or more items on DSM-IV) Slightly less than that found by Wood & Williams
  • Should we be concerned? We are concerned about when they leave the practice sites They may not have credit cards now, but they will Reasons they like to play “gambling” games on the Internet: “sizing up the games” (fairness, odds etc.), don’t have to spend money and regret it later, practice/improve skills/learn game better (50%) Can we minimise harm? Age verification Reality checks: clocks with time clearly visible, clear display of currency unit of amount wagered, mechanisms to help individual monitor time and money spent, customer sets limits on amount can bet/play for specified period Self-exclusion for at least 6 months and those individuals taken off mailing lists Social responsibility/player protection information Advertising should not target under-age youth and should report fairly winning vs. losing Individual should have the option to set a session duration limit for time and money Customer service team should be trained in responsible gambling issues Demo/practice sites: free games must mirror real games in payout rates and method of play Offer same age restriction, social responsibility, and player protection info as real money site Players should have time session limits imposed

Youth gambling online: myths, realities and new understandings Youth gambling online: myths, realities and new understandings Presentation Transcript

  • Dr Jeffrey Derevensky International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems and High-Risk Behaviours, Canada Youth gambling online: myths, realities and new understandings
  • Youth online gambling: Myths, realities and new understandings Jeffrey L. Derevensky, Ph.D. Professor, School/Applied Child Psychology Professor, Psychiatry International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems and High-Risk Behaviors McGill University www.youthgambling.com Victorian Government Responsible Gambling Awareness Week Melbourne, May 23, 2011
  • Problem Severity Continuum No gambling At-Risk gambling Social gambling Problem gambling Pathological gambling Compulsive gambling Disordered gambling
  • The new face of Internet gambling
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  • Joe Cada, age 21, Community College dropout, winner World Series of Poker, 2009, $8.55 million
  • Jonathan Duhamel, age 23, University dropout, winner World Series of Poker, 2010, $8.944 million
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  • Wagering via the Internet
    • Poker/card games
    • Casino games
    • Sports wagering
    • Reality shows
    • Celebrity adoptions, arrests, etc.
    • Any form of contest/Political race
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  • online scratch tickets
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  • Adolescent Internet use…
  • What we know about the Internet
    • Access is widespread
    • Access is inexpensive
    • Internet is anonymous
    • Internet is convenient
    • Internet is entertaining
    • Internet is used for many purposes
  • Prevalence Findings of Internet Wagering
    • Vary considerably
    • Dependent upon methodology used & date of study
    • Dependent upon population studied
    • Difficulties collecting data
  • Is Internet gambling problematic for youth and can we teach/encourage responsible gambling?
  • Some clinical evidence
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  • Two Internet gambling studies
  • www.pokerstars.net
  • Frequency of Play on Internet Gambling Sites Without Money in the Past 12 Months by Gambling Severity 1 Percentage. *** p <.001. N = 2205 Internet Gambling Without Money 1 Yes ( n = 1082) No ( n = 1123) Gambling Groups*** Non Gambler n = 726 33.9 66.1 Social Gambler n = 1278 56.6 43.4 At-Risk Gambler n = 129 74.4 25.6 Probable Pathological Gambler n = 72 80.6 19.4 Total 49.1 50.9
  • Frequency of Play on Internet Gambling Sites With Money in the Past 12 Months by Gambling Severity 1 Percentage *13.1% males; 4.6% females are gambling on Internet N = 2292 Internet Gambling With Money 1 Yes ( n = 183) No ( n = 2109) Gambling Groups*** Non Gambler n = 745 0 100 Social Gambler n = 1333 9.5 90.5 At-Risk Gambler n = 139 21.6 78.4 Probable Pathological Gambler n = 75 34.7 65.3 Total 8.0* 92.0
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  • Follow-up study
    • Montreal high-school students: N = 1113
    • Canadian and U.S. college and university students: N = 1273
    • On-line gaming newsletter link: N = 546
  • Use of “Demo/Practice” Sites
  • Gambling for Money on Internet
  • Gambling for Money on Internet Frequency
  • Internet gambling by gambling severity
  • Reasons Youth Gamble on Internet
  • A new study (Meerkamper, 2010)
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  • National Annenberg Survey of Youth (Romer, 2010) N=835 (2008) N=596 (2010)
    • At least once per month
    • Internet gambling among males 14-17 rose from 2.7% (2008) to 6.2% (2010)
    • Internet gambling among males 18-22 rose from 4.4% (2008) to 16.0% (2010)
    • Internet gambling among females 14-17 rose from 0.5% (2008) to 1.5% (2010)
    • Internet gambling among males 18-22 rose from 0.0% (2008) to 4.4% (2010)
  • National Annenberg Survey of Youth (Romer, 2010) N=835 (2008) N=596 (2010)
    • Weekly
    • Internet gambling among males 14-17 decreased from 0.9% (2008) to 0.0% (2010)
    • Internet gambling among males 18-22 rose from 2.9% (2008) to 3.8% (2010)
    • Internet gambling among females 14-17 stayed the same at 0.0% (2008) and 0.0% (2010)
    • Internet gambling among females 18-22 rose from 0.0% (2008) to 1.3% (2010)
  • Responsible advertising???
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  • Celebrity endorsements….
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  • Parental behaviors….
  • Parental perceptions: Serious Youth Issues
  • Does the Internet contribute to problem gambling among youth?
    • There is good news and bad news
    • The good news:
      • Fewer youth than adults gamble on the Internet
    • The bad news:
      • More youth are playing on “demo/practice” sites than sites for real money
      • The reasons they give are “for practice”
      • 1/3 of the youth who are gambling for money are problem gamblers
    • Does “practice make perfect”?
      • Is it just a matter of time before the “practice” players switch to gambling for real money?
  • Adapted from Understanding Substance Abuse Prevention: Toward 21 st Century Primer on Effective Programs (P. Brounstein & J. Zweig, 1999). Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) & Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Dickson, Derevensky, & Gupta (2002).
  • In retail there are three important principles: Location, Location, Location
  • Responsible gambling for youth: the three important principles are: education, education, education