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  • CONTENTS • Introduction • Chapter-1 • Chapter-2 • Chapter-3 • Chapter-4 • Chapter-5 • Chapter-6 • Chapter-7 • Chapter-8 • Chapter-9 • Chapter-10
  • INTRODUCTION• At the beginning of the book, David (Davie) Balfour is a recently orphaned seventeen-year-old. His father has just died, so it is up to him to seek his own fortune. A good friend of his, the Protestant Minister of Essendean, hands Davie a letter from his deceased father telling him to head to the house of Shaws. Davie doesnt know how his father is related to the house of Shaws, but he is excited at the idea of meeting a laird (a kind of Scottish nobleman, like a "lord"). He thinks maybe hell be able to get a job in the Shaws household. So he walks to the seat of the house of Shaws, near Edinburgh, to ask for help. When Davie arrives at the house, however, he is much disappointed. The owner is actually Davies uncle, Ebenezer Balfour. Ebenezer is a miser and kind of a jerk. He even attempts to kill Davie on one occasion. Why is he so threatened by Davie? Were not going to find out for sure until around Chapter 29 of 30. Still, Davie is fairly sure that Ebenezer hates him because he is the rightful heir to the house of Shaws. At any rate, Davie manages to get the upper hand over Ebenezer, who promises to bring Davie to see his lawyer, Mr. Rankeillor, to get a full explanation of Ebenezers relationship to Davies father. On their way to see Mr. Rankeillor, Ebenezer insists on stopping by a ship that hes made some investments in, which is anchored in the seaside town of Queensferry. The ship is called the Covenant and is captained by a Mr. Hoseason. Once Davie is aboard, Hoseason distracts him with a tour of the ship while Ebenezer hops in a rowboat and rows back to shore. Davie has been kidnapped! It turns out that Ebenezer has told Hoseason to sell Davie to a plantation in the Carolinas. Davies in a real pickle. The Covenant is still sailing around Scotland when Davies luck changes. One foggy night, the Covenant accidentally runs into a small boat. There is only one survivor from the boat, a man named Alan Breck Stewart, who is on the run from the law. Alan is carrying a giant money belt, which is too tempting for Captain Hoseason to resist. Hoseason starts to plot with his first mate, Mr. Riach, to steal the gold and kill Alan. Davie overhears this plot and runs to Alan to warn him. Alan and Davie fortify one of the deck rooms, the round-house, and band together against the rest of the Covenant crew. They manage to hold their own, and finally Hoseason agrees to let Alan off in Appin, in the Scottish Highlands, which is Alans home country. Alan is a Jacobite, meaning that he was part of a Highland uprising against the English throne in 1745. Hes a wanted man, and he only feels safe at home in Appin. Unfortunately, the western portion of the Scottish coast is extremely rocky. The Covenant runs up against a hidden reef and sinks. Davie is thrown from the ship by a wave and winds up washed ashore on the barren island of Earraid. (Here, we definitely suggest that you consider consulting a map.) Davie suffers from hunger and thirst and all-around sickness for a while before discovering that the island hes on is only an island at high tide. When the tide goes out, you can walk to the next island over, the island of Mull, which Davie does. As Davie starts exploring Mull, he finds out that Alan has been leaving coded messages for him, instructing him on how to find him. Davie heads toward Alans home of Appin and reaches the forest of Lettermore, where a group of men is making its way down the road. One of the men is Colin Roy Campbell of Glenure (whom Alan calls Red Fox). This man is
  • CHAPTER-1• It’s the morning of the second day of davie’s long walk.he can finaly see• He asks for directions to the town of Cramond from a local shepherd.• • Davie keeps walking and reaches the parish of Cramond. He starts asking about the house of Shaws.• • He notices that when he mentions the house of Shaws people start acting a little weird. Could there be something wrong with the Shaws?• • Davie sees someone coming down the road with a cart and decides to asks the fellow about the house of Shaws.• • The fellow says that the house is pretty big, but as for the people there – well, there is the lord, Ebenezer, but decent people like Davie should keep clear.• • The next person Davie speaks to is a barber, and he agrees with the cartman that Ebenezer Balfour of Shaws is "nae kind of a man, nae kind of a man at all" (2.15) ("nae" is Scots for "no").• • Davie starts to feel unsettled by these comments, which are vague enough to leave lots of room to the imagination. Still, hes got his pride, so he keeps going.• • Finally, just at sundown, Davie meets a bitter-looking woman. She points to a house at the bottom of the next valley and starts yelling. She tells Davie that, if he sees Ebenezer (the lord), Davie should tell him that this is the 1,219th time that Jennet Clouston has cursed his household.• • By now Davie is really feeling unnerved. He sits down and stares at the house of the Shaws. The thing is, while the countryside surrounding the house is totally beautiful, the house itself is like a ruins.• • The sun sets and Davie is starting to feel hungry. He sees a thin line of smoke rising from the house of Shaws and decides that there must be someone living there after all.• • So he goes to knock on the door. No one answers. He knocks again and listens to the stillness, but its as though "whoever was in that house kept deadly still, and must have held his breath" (2.27).• • Davie starts getting a little ticked off: hes come all this way, after all. So he starts kicking and punching the door and calling for Mr. Balfour.• • He finally gets an answer: a man in a nightcap leans out a window above him, holding a "blunderbuss" (2.28) (a kind of eighteenth century gun that you might recognize from Pirates of the Caribbean).• • Davie tells the man that he has a letter of introduction for Mr. Ebenezer Balfour of Shaws, which he plans to deliver in person. Davie then announces himself as David Balfour.• • This visibly surprises the nightcapped man, who asks Davie if his father has died.• • Davie doesnt reply to this and the man says that Davies father must have died if Davie is at his door. He offers to let Davie in.
  • CHAPTER-2• The door opens and Davie goes in, only to be told to go into the kitchen and not to touch anything.• The nightcapped man closes and relocks the door behind Davie, then joins him in the kitchen.• Davie gets a better look at him: he is thin, stooped, grey, unshaven, and somewhere between fifty and seventy. Davie thinks he looks like a servant – and a badone, at that.• The guy asks if Davie is hungry and offers him porridge ("parritch" (3.5)) while taking a mug of beer for himself.• The guy wants Davies letter; Davie wont give it to anyone but Ebenezer.• "Who de ye think I am?" (3. 9) answers the man. Its his uncle!• Davie is immensely disappointed at this news, and he wants to cry but manages not to. Instead, he silently hands over the letter to Ebenezer.• Ebenezer asks if Davie "kens" (Scots for "knows") whats in the letter? Davie admits that, when he heard he had rich relations, he was hopeful of help, but hesnot a beggar, if thats what Ebenezer is asking.• During this whole conversation, Ebenezer is working hard to avoid meeting Davies eyes. Davie wonders if this is because Ebenezer has lived alone too long.• Ebenezer claims that Davies father, Alexander, was secretive. Davie admits that he didnt know that his father had a brother until after his death.• Ebenezer seems happy about this news, then offers to show Davie to bed.• Ebenezer says that he doesnt believe in lighting houses, so keeps the old place in complete darkness. He shows Davie to a cold, dark, damp room and locks him infrom the outside.• The next morning, Ebenezer lets Davie out of his room and the two have breakfast together: beer and porridge again.• Ebenezer asks after Davies mother (who is dead) and his friends. Davie tells Ebenezer about "different gentlemen" (3.40) named Campbell (hes stretchingthe truth here because he doesnt want to seem helpless – we know theres only one Mr. Campbell).• Ebenezer tells Davie that family is very important to him, and that if Davie will give him a day or two and will "say naething to naebody," hell "do right" (3.43)by Davie.• Davie says that hell be very grateful. He then asks if he can put his bed sheets out to dry because they were damp the night before. Ebenezer seems a little angryat this request (which we think is pretty reasonable), but he soon changes his tune and reminds Davie that the two of them belong to the same family.• Davie passes along Jennet Cloustons curses, which sends Ebenezer into a rage. He gets dressed to go out.• Ebenezer tells Davie that when hes not home hell have to lock Davie out of the house.• Davie wont stand for this. He complains that Ebenezer doesnt even seem to like him, so he cant imagine why Ebenezer is keeping him there.• Again, Ebenezer seems very angry, but he hides it quickly and protests that he likes Davie just fine. Ebenezer really seems to want Davie to stay at the houseof Shaws
  • CHAPTER-3•After this direct confrontation, Davie is pretty surprised that the rest of the day isnt so bad. After breakfast, he finds Ebenezers library, which he spends the restof the afternoon perusing.•Davie finds something a little odd, though. On the front page of a pamphlet (called a "chap-book" (4. 2)), there is an inscription in his dads handwriting to hisbrother Ebenezer on his fifth birthday. But Davie is sure that Alexander was the younger brother. So either his dad learned to write really well when he was aroundfour years old, or else he must have (weirdly) gotten Ebenezers age wrong.•Davie later asks Ebenezer if his father was an exceptionally quick student, and Ebenezer says no. Davie asks Ebenezer if he and Alexander were twins, andEbenezer jumps up and grabs Davie by his jacket.•Davie tells Ebenezer to let him go and asks what this is all about.•Ebenezer pulls himself together and asks Davie not to speak of Alexander any more: its too painful for him.•Davie begins to wonder if his uncle is either crazy or trying to keep him from something that is rightfully his.•Ebenezer tells Davie that hes set aside some money for him, from before his birth. Its 40 pounds – and theres a weird little negotiation here. At first, Ebenezersays that hes promised Davie 40 Scottish pounds, which would have been worth about 2 English pounds. But Davie says, "Pounds sterling, I believe!" (4.14), andhis uncle agrees, even though 40 English pounds (pounds sterling) would be about 20 times the value of Ebenezers original offer.•Ebenezer sends Davie out the door while he counts out this money.•Davie is sure that Ebenezer is lying to him about this whole setting-aside-money story, but hes okay with going along with it for now. So he steps outside and noticesthat a storm is coming in.•Ebenezer calls Davie back in and gives him 37 guinea pieces (about 38 pounds and 17 shillings). Davie is amazed by Ebenezers sudden generosity when he is soobviously a terrible miser.•Ebenezer says that, now, Davie owes him. Davie promises to do whatever Ebenezer wants (so long as its reasonable).•Ebenezer asks for help with the house and garden, as hes getting old. Davie accepts. Ebenezer suggests they start now and sends Davie – still in the dark, becauseEbenezer hates lights in the house – to a tower at the end of the house for some papers.•Davie dutifully heads outside to the stairs to the tower. Its pitch black outside and he has to feel his way along the wall to find the staircase, which is uneven anddangerous underfoot.•What makes the staircase even more dangerous is that it is unfinished! It only rises to a certain point. Fortunately, a flash of lighting lights up the scene, preventingDavie from falling five stories straight down.
  • CHAPTER-4• now knows his uncle hates him. He starts imagining how hell get the better of Ebenezer, and the thought really tickles his fancy. Hes feelingpretty full of himself by now.• Davie brings Ebenezer down to breakfast, then asks him point blank what is going on.• Ebenezer says hell tell Davie just after breakfast. Davies sure hes going to be lied to again.• Just when things are getting interesting, theres a knock at the door. Davie goes to answer.• Its a kid, dressed like a sailor and blue from the cold. He starts doing a kind of sailor dance, sings a snatch of poetry, and then says he has a messagefrom "old Heasyoasy" to "Mr. Belflower" (5.12) – by which he means Balfour.• The letter is from Elias Hoaseason, an agent whos in business with Ebenezer to back a merchant ship, the Covenant.• Ebenezer suggests that Davie come with Ebenezer to the docks to talk to a nearby lawyer, Mr. Rankeillor. This Rankeillor can supposedlyprove that Ebenezers story (which we still havent heard) is true.• Davie decides the Ferry area will be crowded and his uncle wont have a chance to try anything funny. So they head out with the cabin boy.• It turns out that the boy is named Ransome, and hes been at sea since he was nine. Ransome is not talking much sense: he shows Davie a terribleopen wound inflicted on him by one of the officers of the Covenant, "Mr. Shuan," which he seems to think is a sign of what a great man Mr. Shuan is.• Davie thinks all of Ransomes talk proves what an awful ship the Covenant must be, even though the name seems religious.• At this point we need to give you a bit of historical background about the name of this ship. The Covenanters were a group of very politicalPresbyterian Christians who attempted to form a system of government around the Church of Scotland in the seventeenth century. This pitted the Covenantersagainst the Anglican church, which acknowledges the ruling king or queen of England as its leader. So at the same time that England is trying to take overScotland, the English and the Scottish churches are getting involved in the brawl between the two countries. It all becomes pretty confusing, but the essential point is:the Covenanters are associated with Scottish patriotism, the Scottish Parliament, and a movement against the English kings (source). And we know that Stevensonis probably using "covenant" to remind his readers of this history because he refers to Patrick Walker, a Covenant pamphlet writer, elsewhere in the book (4.2).• The boy, Ransome, continues, talking about the "twenty-pounders" (5.31), people who are kidnapped or sold into slavery and who are therefore evenworse off than Ransome is.• Another point of clarification here: Davie refers to people "trepanned [. . .] for private interest or vengeance" (5.31). Trepanning is an old wordthat means kidnapping someone to make them work for you. Hes definitely not talking about the crazy surgical procedure, also called trepanning, where you drill ahole into some poor guys head to relieve pressure on the brain. Just FYI!• From the top of a hill, Davie can finally see the river Forth emptying into the harbor, where a ferry is set up for upriver travel from the sea. Beyond
  • CHAPTER-5• Ransome, Davie, and Ebenezer arrive at Hawes Inn, where they encounter a cool, self-possessed-looking guy: Elias Hoseason, captain of theCovenant.• Ebenezer comments that Hoseason keeps his room really hot.• Hoseason replies that hes always freezing -- he has cold blood.• Ebenezer says all right, we cant help how were made.• Davie has decided hes going to stick close to Ebenezer. But the room is really stuffy. So when Ebenezer suggests that Davie go off and amusehimself for a bit, Davie does it.• Davie looks out at the bay and starts to feel pretty excited: the smell of the sea and the sight of the ship make him think of trips to far-off places.• The look of the crew puts Davie off a bit, though: they all seem like criminals, with their swearing and desperate appearance.• Ransome comes out of the inn and joins Davie, and they head off for a brew at the inn.• Davie asks the innkeeper if he knows a Mr. Rankeillor.• The innkeeper asks if Davie came in with Ebenezer, and Davie says yes.• The innkeeper asks if Davie is a relative of Ebenezers. Davie lies and says no. The innkeeper says – and here the plot thickens – that Davie doeslook a little bit like Alexander.• The innkeeper confirms that Ebenezer is much hated throughout the area because hes driven a lot of local tenants out of their homes (includingJennet Clouston). Still, its sad, the innkeeper continues: Ebenezer was a good, handsome young guy, but that all changed when the rumor got around that he killedhis older brother, Alexander.• Davie is thrilled to find out that its just as he suspected: Alexander was Ebenezers older brother, which makes Davie heir to the house of Shaws.His fortunes been made!• Just as Davie thinks this, he sees Hoseason through the inn window and tells us, the readers, that Hoseason is neither so good as he looks nor so badas Ransome says he is. But Hoseasons at his worst on his ship.• Next, Davie hears Ebenezer calling him from outside, and he goes to join Hoseason and Ebenezer.• Hoseason invites Davie to come aboard the Covenant for half an hour to share a drink with him.• Davie wants to say yes because hes really curious about the inside of a ship, but hes suspicious, so he tells Hoseason he and his uncle have anappointment with a lawyer.
  • CHAPTER-6• When Davie regains consciousness, he finds himself tied up and in pain in a dark room.• The intense rocking of the ship convinces Davie that they are in a storm. He is so afraid for his future and so angry at his uncle that he faints again.• When Davie comes to a second time, seasickness is added to his list of troubles. This, Davie tells us, is pretty much the worst moment in his life,these miserable first hours on the Covenant.• Davie hears gunfire. He finds out afterwards that these shots have come from the town of Dysart, which the Covenant was passing. The captainMr. Hoseasons mother lived in Dysart, and whenever the Covenant passed, she fired shots and raised a flag in her sons honor.• Davie has no idea how long he spent in "that ill-smelling cavern of the ships bowels" (7.4) before he falls asleep a third time.• Davie wakes up to a light shining on his face from a lantern held by a guy in his thirties, with green eyes and light hair.• The stranger asks Davie how he is.• Davie starts to cry. The stranger cleans the injury on Davies head and tells him to cheer up. He offers Davie food, gives him a bit of brandy andwater, then leaves.• When the stranger returns a bit later, Davie is wandering in the head with a bad fever.• The stranger is accompanied this time by Captain Hoseason. The stranger tells Hoseason that Davie is ill, and he needs to be brought up abovedeck.• The captain says tough – Davies not going anywhere.• The stranger – whose name, we now learn, is Mr. Riach – tells Captain Hoseason that he (Riach) was hired to be the ships second mate. Hehasnt been paid for anything more, and he wont help in committing murder.• Captain Hoseason is angry that Riach could suspect him of such a thing. He tells Riach to take Davie wherever he pleases, if he thinks Daviewill die otherwise.• Davie notices two things: Riach is a little drunk, and he seems like hell be a good friend to him.• Riach frees Davie and carries him up to a bunk in the forecastle, where Davie falls asleep yet again.• When Davie wakes up, hes glad to see the sun at last. Hes also no longer alone: there are sailors all around.• Davie spends many days in the bunk recuperating.• He also gets to know the Covenants sailors. While theyre kind of rough -- and several of them are out-and-out criminals – he feels guilty abouthow judgmental he was when he first saw them at the Queens Ferry.
  • CHAPTER-7• When Davie regains consciousness, he finds himself tied up and in pain in a dark room.• The intense rocking of the ship convinces Davie that they are in a storm. He is so afraid for his future and so angry at his uncle that he faints again.• When Davie comes to a second time, seasickness is added to his list of troubles. This, Davie tells us, is pretty much the worst moment in his life,these miserable first hours on the Covenant.• Davie hears gunfire. He finds out afterwards that these shots have come from the town of Dysart, which the Covenant was passing. The captainMr. Hoseasons mother lived in Dysart, and whenever the Covenant passed, she fired shots and raised a flag in her sons honor.• Davie has no idea how long he spent in "that ill-smelling cavern of the ships bowels" (7.4) before he falls asleep a third time.• Davie wakes up to a light shining on his face from a lantern held by a guy in his thirties, with green eyes and light hair.• The stranger asks Davie how he is.• Davie starts to cry. The stranger cleans the injury on Davies head and tells him to cheer up. He offers Davie food, gives him a bit of brandy andwater, then leaves.• When the stranger returns a bit later, Davie is wandering in the head with a bad fever.• The stranger is accompanied this time by Captain Hoseason. The stranger tells Hoseason that Davie is ill, and he needs to be brought up abovedeck.• The captain says tough – Davies not going anywhere.• The stranger – whose name, we now learn, is Mr. Riach – tells Captain Hoseason that he (Riach) was hired to be the ships second mate. Hehasnt been paid for anything more, and he wont help in committing murder.• Captain Hoseason is angry that Riach could suspect him of such a thing. He tells Riach to take Davie wherever he pleases, if he thinks Daviewill die otherwise.• Davie notices two things: Riach is a little drunk, and he seems like hell be a good friend to him.• Riach frees Davie and carries him up to a bunk in the forecastle, where Davie falls asleep yet again.• When Davie wakes up, hes glad to see the sun at last. Hes also no longer alone: there are sailors all around.• Davie spends many days in the bunk recuperating.• He also gets to know the Covenants sailors. While theyre kind of rough -- and several of them are out-and-out criminals – he feels guilty abouthow judgmental he was when he first saw them at the Queens Ferry.
  • CAPTER-8• Things take a dark turn: one night, a man comes into the forecastle muttering "Shuan had done for him at last" (8.1).• Captain Hoseason enters as well and addresses Davie (much to his surprise).• Hoseason tells Davie that, from now on, hes going to serve in the round-house, the highest cabin in a ship (source), which houses CaptainHoseason, Shuan, and Riach. In other words, Davies the ships new cabin boy. But whats happened to the old cabin boy?• At this point, two sailors come in to the forecastle carrying Ransome, whose face is pale and contorted.• Hoseason quickly sends Davie away.• Davie notices that, even though its eleven at night, the sun is only just setting. But he doesnt realize what that means. The thing is, in the far northern Scottishislands (the Orkney and the Shetland Islands) in the summer, the sun stays in the sky until late at night.• Davie has gotten turned around: he thinks, because hes been locked up for so long, that they must be nearly across the Atlantic. But they havent even leftScotland yet. The headwinds blowing against the ships masts have been blowing so strong in the wrong direction that the Covenant is hardly making any progress.• Davie makes it to the round-house, where he sees Shuan sitting in a daze staring at the table.• Captain Hoseason comes in looking stern, followed by Riach. Riach gives "the captain a glance that meant the boy was dead as plain as speaking" (8.10).(Thats a lot of grim news to cram into one glance.)• Shuan reaches for the bottle of brandy in front of him, and Riach snatches it from him. Shuan jumps up, looking fit to kill Riach.• Hoseason tells Shuan to sit down. Does he know what hes done?! Hes killed Ransome!• Shuan replies that Ransome brought him a dirty pannikin (a small cup).• This reply freaks out Hoseason, Riach, and Davie.• Hoseason tells Shuan to go lie down, and Shuan, crying a little, takes off his sea boots and obeys.• Riach tells Hoseason he should have done something long ago to put a stop to Shuans abuse of Ransome. Hoseason tells Riach that they must not tell anyoneback in Dysart (the ships home harbor) whats really happened here tonight. Ransome went overboard, and thats their story. Then Riach and Hoseason settle in for a drink.• Davie quickly adapts to his duties, which include serving meals and bringing the officers drinks when they ask for them. Working for all three officers, hesalways busy.• Hoseason and Riach are both patient with his mistakes (perhaps because theyre feeling bad about Ransome).• Shuan seems to have gone a little crazy after his murder of Ransome: whenever Davie is around, Shuan stares at him continually. In fact, Shuan doesnt seemto recall exactly what happened to Ransome, confuses Davie with Ransome, and generally worries all the time.• Davie enjoys the stories he can sometimes get Riach and Hoseason to tell him about the world, but hes still not exactly happy. He hates serving three men hedoesnt respect, and hes dreading his future life as a slave on a plantation.
  • CHAPTER-9• The Covenants bad luck with the winds continues, and the ship makes little progress. Eventually they decide to turn south to stop going againstthe prevailing winds.• On the tenth day of his career as cabin boy, Davie is serving Riach and Hoseason their dinner when the ship suddenly hits something with a bang.• Its night, the fog is thick, and the Covenant has managed to run down a rowboat. All of the boats crew are lost except for one man.• This single survivor is small and nimble, carries a pair of pistols and a sword, and has elegant manners. Davie immediately sees friend material inthe stranger.• Davie can also tell that the captain has noticed the strangers expensive clothing; he is no doubt eager to make a buck or two off this guy.• Hoseason and the stranger then have a weird coded conversation that Davie doesnt entirely follow. The captain tells the stranger that he has been toFrance. He notes that the stranger has a Scottish tongue and a French coat. The stranger asks, pretty much point blank, if Hoseason is a Jacobite. Hoseason sayshes a Protestant, but hes willing to help a guy out anyway.• So what does all this stuff about France, Scotland, and the Jacobites mean? Forgive us for a long side note, but you really need this historicalinformation to understand what this new character is all about.• Okay, heres the deal: in the 1640s and 50s, England had its very own civil war between believers in the divine rule of the king (also known as theRoyalists) and supporters of a democratically elected Parliament . At its most basic level, this war boiled down to a struggle over what gives a king power: is it god (asthe Royalists felt) or politics (as the Parliamentarians believed)?• The Parliament won, for a little while at least, and King Charles I had his head chopped off. But then his son, Charles II, was put back on thethrone, and his brother, King James II of England and VII of Scotland, followed Charles II. A happy ending for the Royalists, you might think. But no!The Parliamentarians werent done yet.• There was another revolution, in 1688, which removed James II and VII from power. (This is only one guy, even though hes got lots of numbersfollowing his name. If you want to know why hes the 2nd James of England but the 7th of Scotland, its because Scotland had its own line of kings, a bunch of themnamed James, before lucky James the First/Sixth got to take the English throne and keep the Scottish throne after the death of the childless English QueenElizabeth I.)• The Parliament determined that it had the right to appoint kings to the throne, and never mind about God. Parliament gave the English thronejointly to James II and VIIs son-in-law and daughter, William and Mary (source).• BUT! A number of people refused to recognize this new king and queen and continued to support James II and VII as the legitimate king ofScotland and England. These people were called the Jacobites. James II and VII fled to the European continent (France for a bit, then Spain), and his
  • CHAPTER-10• The captain gets impatient waiting on deck and sticks his head through the open door.• Alan meets Hoseason with his drawn sword and tells him to prepare for a battle.• Hoseason doesnt reply directly, but he does tell Davie that hell remember this.• Davies not exactly afraid, but hes really, really keyed up: hes pretty sure theyre going to lose, and he wants to make sure he takes as many of their enemiesdown as he can.• The first one to rush in is Shuan, whom Alan stabs through with his sword.• Davie shoots into a crowd of men with a battering ram, trying to break through the door that Alan is guarding. They retreat.• Alan warns Davie that this is just the beginning: hes killed two and Davies wounded one, but that wont be enough to stop the crew.• Davie recharges his pistols.• He overhears some of the sailors on deck saying that Shuan is the one who messed it all up, and they should shut up about him ("wheesht" (10.22), the Scotsword for quiet) because hes dead.• Davie warns Alan that theyre coming back. Alan says theres nothing they can do but sit and wait.• While theyre sitting, Davie has time to start feeling afraid.• Finally, Davie hears the whistle of a pipe, the signal for the second round of fighting to start. A bunch of sailors rush at the door and two guys jump in throughthe skylight in the roof. Davie shoots the two men, then runs over to help Alan with the group by the door.• Alan manages just fine by himself, though. The sailors (those who still can) run away from his sword.• Inside the round-house, there are three dead guys, one whos dying, and Alan and Davie both totally intact.• Alan seems pretty hyped up by all of this action: he embraces Davie and says that he loves him like a brother (weve reached the "I love you, man!" stage of thisbromance).• Alans so happy with his own performance that he bursts into song (seriously). He sings in Gaelic (the language of the Scottish Highlands), which Davietranslates into English. We have to say, the lyrics are pretty snappy: theyre all about Alans overall awesomeness.• Davies a little annoyed now that hes writing this down, because he realizes that the song says nothing about his contribution to all of this killing. At thetime, though, Davie tells us that he mostly felt sick about what hed done. In fact, he starts to cry.• Alan says that Davies just tired and tells him to go to sleep; Alan plans to keep watch. The two of them trade watch duties all night, but theres not a peep fromthe rest of the guys on the ship.