Weapons of mass destruction

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Weapons of mass destruction

  1. 1. A weapon of mass destruction is a weapon that can kill and bring significant harm to a large number of humans and or cause great damage to man-made structures natural structures or the biosphere in general. The scope and application of the term has evolved and been disputed, often signifying more politically than technically. Coined in reference to aerial bombing with chemical explosives, it has come to distinguish large-scale weaponry of other technologies, such as chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear. This differentiates the term from more technical ones such as chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear weapons
  2. 2. Weapons that are capable of a high order of destruction and/or of being used in such a manner as to destroy large numbers of people. Weapons of mass destruction can be high explosives or nuclear, biological, chemical, and radiological weapons, but exclude the means of transporting or propelling the weapon where such means is a separable and divisible part of the weapon. Also called WMD. See also destruction; special operations.
  3. 3. The threat that the nuclear weapons of mass destruction pose to the entire human civilizations and the whole of humanity is serious. There are different sorts of people who worry about the lack of patriotic, linguistic, religious, ethnic importance/values in the society. But not much people worry about the real threat to the entire mankind including that of the religious, ethnic, cultural values through the nuclear weapons.
  4. 4. Chemical weapons did not become true weapons of mass destruction (WMD) until they were introduced in their modern form in World War I (1914–18). The German army initiated modern chemical warfare by launching a chlorine attack at Ypres, Belgium, on April 22, 1915, killing 5,000 French and Algerian troops and momentarily breaching their lines of defense. German use of gas and mustard was soon countered by similar tactics from the Allies. By war’s end, both sides had used massive quantities of chemical weapons, causing an estimated 1,300,000 casualties, including 91,000 fatalities. The Russian army suffered about 500,000 of these casualties, and the British had 180,000 wounded or killed by chemical arms. One-third of all U.S. casualties in World War I were from mustard and other chemical gases, roughly the ratio for all participants combined. By the war’s end, all the great powers involved had developed not only offensive chemical arms but also crude gas masks and protective overgarments to defend themselves against chemical weapon attacks. Altogether, the warring states employed more than two dozen different chemical agents during World War I, including mustard gas, which caused perhaps as many as 90 percent of all chemical casualties from that conflict.
  5. 5. Biological warfare has been part of human conflict throughout the ages. Biological agents were used in many of the conflicts of the 20th century and their use is now reported daily in the headlines. Crude methods such as using dead or diseased animals to foul wells or gifts of contaminated blankets and clothes have been replaced by delivery systems of missiles, airplanes, and the postal service. Biological agents are gaining status as a terrorist's weapon of choice The psychological and demoralizing impact of an infectious or toxic agent is likely to be more devastating than its physiological effect. Many biological agents, including bacteria, viruses, and toxins, can be used as weapons.
  6. 6. Weapons that are capable of a high order of destruction and/or of being used in such a manner as to destroy large numbers of people. Weapons of mass destruction can be high explosives or nuclear, biological, chemical, and radiological weapons, but exclude the means of transporting or propelling the weapon where such means is a separable and divisible part of the weapon. Also called WMD. See also destruction; special operations.

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