Shakespeare
1564 – 1616
Avon - England

Click
William Shakespeare




William Shakespeare ranks as perhaps the
most famous writer in the history of English
literature...
The birth of Shakespeare


A complete, authoritative
account of
Shakespeare’s life is
lacking; much
supposition surrounds...
Shakespeare goes to school


He was probably educated
at the local grammar
school. As the eldest son,
Shakespeare ordinar...
Religion and Politics


Elizabethan England. In recent years, it has more
convincingly been argued that he was caught up ...
Shakespeare in love



In 1582 he married Anne Hathaway, the daughter of a farmer.
He is supposed to have left Stratford ...
Timeline of Shakespeare Works
Although the precise date of many of Shakespeare’s plays is
in doubt, his dramatic career is...
First Period
Shakespeare’s first period
was one of experimentation.
His early plays, unlike his
more mature work, are
char...
Second Period
Shakespeare’s second
period includes his most
important plays
concerned with English
history, his so-called
...
THE GLOBE THEATRE
THE NEW GLOBE THEATRE
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

The Globe was built in 1599 using timber from
an earlier theatre.
The Globe was owned by many actors.
Shak...
Shakespeare's Stage
1.
2.
3.
4.

The Chamberlain's Men
performed most of their
plays on the multi-leveled spaces of the Gl...
Actors

1.Only men and boys.

2. Young boys whose voices had not changed play
women’s roles.
3. Would have been considered...
Characters








Protagonist (main character)
Antagonist (main character)
Flat characters: One-dimensional, embodyi...
SOME WORKS
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Shakespeare 3

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Shakespeare 3

  1. 1. Shakespeare 1564 – 1616 Avon - England Click
  2. 2. William Shakespeare   William Shakespeare ranks as perhaps the most famous writer in the history of English literature. Shakespeare employed poetry and verse within his dramatic comedies, tragedies, and histories, and he also composed notable individual poems. His poems include a series of 154 sonnets, unusually arranged as three quatrains and a couplet; the development was original enough for it to become known as the Shakespearian sonnet. The book was printed in 1609. © 1993-2003 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
  3. 3. The birth of Shakespeare  A complete, authoritative account of Shakespeare’s life is lacking; much supposition surrounds relatively few facts. His day of birth is traditionally held to be April 23 in Stratfordupon-Avon, Warwickshire. The third of eight children, he was the eldest son of John Shakespeare, a locally prominent merchant, and Mary Arden, daughter of a Roman Catholic member of the landed gentry. Place of Shakespeare’s birth
  4. 4. Shakespeare goes to school  He was probably educated at the local grammar school. As the eldest son, Shakespeare ordinarily would have been apprenticed to his father’s shop so that he could learn and eventually take over the business, but according to one apocryphal account he was apprenticed to a butcher because of reverses in his father’s financial situation.
  5. 5. Religion and Politics  Elizabethan England. In recent years, it has more convincingly been argued that he was caught up in the secretive network of Catholic believers and priests who strove to cultivate their faith in the inhospitable conditions
  6. 6. Shakespeare in love  In 1582 he married Anne Hathaway, the daughter of a farmer. He is supposed to have left Stratford after he was caught poaching in the deer park of Sir Thomas Lucy, a cottage justice Anne Hathaway’s local of the peace. Shakespeare and Anne Hathaway produced a daughter, Susanna, in 1583 and twins—a boy and a girl—in 1585. The boy died 11 years later
  7. 7. Timeline of Shakespeare Works Although the precise date of many of Shakespeare’s plays is in doubt, his dramatic career is generally divided into four periods. These divisions are necessarily arbitrary ways of viewing Shakespeare’s creative development, since his plays are notoriously hard to date accurately, either in terms of when they were written or when they were first performed. Click on the timeline to learn more First Period Second Period Third Period Fourth Period
  8. 8. First Period Shakespeare’s first period was one of experimentation. His early plays, unlike his more mature work, are characterized to a degree by formal and rather obvious construction and often stylized verse.
  9. 9. Second Period Shakespeare’s second period includes his most important plays concerned with English history, his so-called joyous comedies, and two major tragedies. In this period, his style and approach became highly individualized.
  10. 10. THE GLOBE THEATRE
  11. 11. THE NEW GLOBE THEATRE
  12. 12. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. The Globe was built in 1599 using timber from an earlier theatre. The Globe was owned by many actors. Shakespeare owned a single share, or 12.5%. The stage measured approximately 43 feet (13.1m) in width, 27 feet (8.2m) in depth. On this stage, there was a trap door for use by performers to enter from the "cellarage" area beneath the stage.
  13. 13. Shakespeare's Stage 1. 2. 3. 4. The Chamberlain's Men performed most of their plays on the multi-leveled spaces of the Globe Theater. Shakespeare gave sets, props and costumes his audiences almost entirely through language. there are no trees or battlements or roaring surf but only a bare stage jutting out among the spectators. Visual spectacle, though not unimportant, was secondary to dialogue; we speak of going to "see" a play where audiences up to the nineteenth century spoke of "hearing" one.
  14. 14. Actors 1.Only men and boys. 2. Young boys whose voices had not changed play women’s roles. 3. Would have been considered indecent for a woman to appear on stage.
  15. 15. Characters      Protagonist (main character) Antagonist (main character) Flat characters: One-dimensional, embodying only a single trait. Shakespeare often uses them to provide comic relief even in a tragedy. Static Characters: Characters within a story who remain the same. They do not change. They do not change their minds, opinions or character. Dynamic Characters: Characters that change somehow during the course of the plot. They generally change for the better.
  16. 16. SOME WORKS
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