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Técnicas de-apresentao4724
 

Técnicas de-apresentao4724

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  • Unexpectedness. You can get people’s interest by violating their expectations. Surprise people. Surprise will get their interest. But to sustain their interest you have to stimulate their curiosity. The best way to do that is to pose questions or open up holes in people’s knowledge and then fill those holes, say the authors. Make the audience aware that they have a gap in their knowledge and then fill that gap with the answers to the puzzle (or guide them to the answers). Take people on a journey of discovery. (The Discovery Channel’s MythBusters is about the only thing I can watch on the virtually unwatchable boob-tube these days as the TV program does a wonderful job of posing questions and then answering them, often in quite unexpected ways.) http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2007/07/make.html
  • Unexpectedness. You can get people’s interest by violating their expectations. Surprise people. Surprise will get their interest. But to sustain their interest you have to stimulate their curiosity. The best way to do that is to pose questions or open up holes in people’s knowledge and then fill those holes, say the authors. Make the audience aware that they have a gap in their knowledge and then fill that gap with the answers to the puzzle (or guide them to the answers). Take people on a journey of discovery. (The Discovery Channel’s MythBusters is about the only thing I can watch on the virtually unwatchable boob-tube these days as the TV program does a wonderful job of posing questions and then answering them, often in quite unexpected ways.) http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2007/07/make.html
  • Concrete. Use natural speech and give real examples with real things, not abstractions. Speak of concrete images not of vague notions. Proverbs are good, say the authors, at reducing abstract concepts to concrete, simple, but powerful (and memorable) language. For example, here in Japan we say “ii seki ni cho” or “kill two birds with one stone.” Easier than saying something like “…let’s work toward maximizing our productivity by increasing efficiency across departments,” etc. And the phrase “…go to the moon and back” by JFK (and Ralph Kramden before him)? That’s concrete. You can visualize that. http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2007/07/make.html
  • Concrete. Use natural speech and give real examples with real things, not abstractions. Speak of concrete images not of vague notions. Proverbs are good, say the authors, at reducing abstract concepts to concrete, simple, but powerful (and memorable) language. For example, here in Japan we say “ii seki ni cho” or “kill two birds with one stone.” Easier than saying something like “…let’s work toward maximizing our productivity by increasing efficiency across departments,” etc. And the phrase “…go to the moon and back” by JFK (and Ralph Kramden before him)? That’s concrete. You can visualize that. http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2007/07/make.html
  • Credible. If you are famous in your field you may have built-in credibility (but even that doesn’t go as far as it used to). Most of us, however, do not have that kind of credibility so we reach for numbers and cold hard data to support our claims as market leaders and so on. Statistics, say the Heath brothers, are not inherently helpful. What’s important is the context and the meaning of those statistics. Put it in terms people can visualize. “66 grams of fat” or “the equivalent of three Big Macs”? And if you showed a photo of the burgers, wouldn’t that stick? There are many ways to establish credibility, a quote from a client or the press may help, for example. But a long-winded account of your company’s history won’t help. In Japan especially, having a well-known trusted business partner or some big-name customers help establish credibility. The Heath brothers outline many good examples of credibility in their book.. http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2007/07/make.html
  • Credible. If you are famous in your field you may have built-in credibility (but even that doesn’t go as far as it used to). Most of us, however, do not have that kind of credibility so we reach for numbers and cold hard data to support our claims as market leaders and so on. Statistics, say the Heath brothers, are not inherently helpful. What’s important is the context and the meaning of those statistics. Put it in terms people can visualize. “66 grams of fat” or “the equivalent of three Big Macs”? And if you showed a photo of the burgers, wouldn’t that stick? There are many ways to establish credibility, a quote from a client or the press may help, for example. But a long-winded account of your company’s history won’t help. In Japan especially, having a well-known trusted business partner or some big-name customers help establish credibility. The Heath brothers outline many good examples of credibility in their book.. http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2007/07/make.html
  • Emotional. People are emotional beings. It is not enough to take people through a laundry list of talking points and information on your slides, you must make them feel something. There are a million ways to help people feel something about your content. Images, of course, are one way to have audiences not only understand your point better but also to feel and to have a more visceral and emotional connection to your idea. Explaining the devastation of the Katrina hurricane and flood in the US, for example, could be done with bulletpoints, data, and talking points, but  images of the aftermath and the pictures of the human suffering that occurred told the story in ways words alone never could. Just the words “Hurricane Katrina” conjure up vivid images in your mind today no doubt. We make emotional connections with people not abstractions. When possible put your ideas in human terms. “90 grams of fat” may seem concrete to you, but for others it's an abstraction. A picture (or verbal description) of an enormous plate of greasy French fries stacked high, a double cheese burger (extra cheese), and a large chocolate shake (extra whip cream) is visceral and sticky. http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2007/07/make.html
  • Emotional. People are emotional beings. It is not enough to take people through a laundry list of talking points and information on your slides, you must make them feel something. There are a million ways to help people feel something about your content. Images, of course, are one way to have audiences not only understand your point better but also to feel and to have a more visceral and emotional connection to your idea. Explaining the devastation of the Katrina hurricane and flood in the US, for example, could be done with bulletpoints, data, and talking points, but  images of the aftermath and the pictures of the human suffering that occurred told the story in ways words alone never could. Just the words “Hurricane Katrina” conjure up vivid images in your mind today no doubt. We make emotional connections with people not abstractions. When possible put your ideas in human terms. “90 grams of fat” may seem concrete to you, but for others it's an abstraction. A picture (or verbal description) of an enormous plate of greasy French fries stacked high, a double cheese burger (extra cheese), and a large chocolate shake (extra whip cream) is visceral and sticky. http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2007/07/make.html
  • Stories. We tell stories all day long. It’s how humans have always communicated. We tell stories with our words and even with our art. We express ourselves through the stories we share. We teach, we learn, and we grow through stories. Why is it that when the majority of smart, talented people have the chance to present we usually get streams of information rather than story from them? Great ideas and great presentations have an element of story to them. But you see storytelling everywhere in the workplace. In Japan, for example, it’s a custom for a senior worker (sempai) to mentor a younger worker (kohai) on various issues concerning the company history and culture, and of course on how to do the job. The sempai does much of his informal teaching trough storytelling, though nobody calls it that. But that’s what it is. Once a younger worker hears the “story” of what happened to the poor guy who didn’t wear his hardhat on the factory floor one day he never forgets the lesson (and he never forgets to wear his hardhat). Stories get our attention and are easier to remember than lists of rules. http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2007/07/make.html
  • Stories. We tell stories all day long. It’s how humans have always communicated. We tell stories with our words and even with our art. We express ourselves through the stories we share. We teach, we learn, and we grow through stories. Why is it that when the majority of smart, talented people have the chance to present we usually get streams of information rather than story from them? Great ideas and great presentations have an element of story to them. But you see storytelling everywhere in the workplace. In Japan, for example, it’s a custom for a senior worker (sempai) to mentor a younger worker (kohai) on various issues concerning the company history and culture, and of course on how to do the job. The sempai does much of his informal teaching trough storytelling, though nobody calls it that. But that’s what it is. Once a younger worker hears the “story” of what happened to the poor guy who didn’t wear his hardhat on the factory floor one day he never forgets the lesson (and he never forgets to wear his hardhat). Stories get our attention and are easier to remember than lists of rules. http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2007/07/make.html
  • Stories. We tell stories all day long. It’s how humans have always communicated. We tell stories with our words and even with our art. We express ourselves through the stories we share. We teach, we learn, and we grow through stories. Why is it that when the majority of smart, talented people have the chance to present we usually get streams of information rather than story from them? Great ideas and great presentations have an element of story to them. But you see storytelling everywhere in the workplace. In Japan, for example, it’s a custom for a senior worker (sempai) to mentor a younger worker (kohai) on various issues concerning the company history and culture, and of course on how to do the job. The sempai does much of his informal teaching trough storytelling, though nobody calls it that. But that’s what it is. Once a younger worker hears the “story” of what happened to the poor guy who didn’t wear his hardhat on the factory floor one day he never forgets the lesson (and he never forgets to wear his hardhat). Stories get our attention and are easier to remember than lists of rules. http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2007/07/make.html
  • Unexpectedness. You can get people’s interest by violating their expectations. Surprise people. Surprise will get their interest. But to sustain their interest you have to stimulate their curiosity. The best way to do that is to pose questions or open up holes in people’s knowledge and then fill those holes, say the authors. Make the audience aware that they have a gap in their knowledge and then fill that gap with the answers to the puzzle (or guide them to the answers). Take people on a journey of discovery. (The Discovery Channel’s MythBusters is about the only thing I can watch on the virtually unwatchable boob-tube these days as the TV program does a wonderful job of posing questions and then answering them, often in quite unexpected ways.) http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2007/07/make.html
  • Unexpectedness. You can get people’s interest by violating their expectations. Surprise people. Surprise will get their interest. But to sustain their interest you have to stimulate their curiosity. The best way to do that is to pose questions or open up holes in people’s knowledge and then fill those holes, say the authors. Make the audience aware that they have a gap in their knowledge and then fill that gap with the answers to the puzzle (or guide them to the answers). Take people on a journey of discovery. (The Discovery Channel’s MythBusters is about the only thing I can watch on the virtually unwatchable boob-tube these days as the TV program does a wonderful job of posing questions and then answering them, often in quite unexpected ways.) http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2007/07/make.html
  • Unexpectedness. You can get people’s interest by violating their expectations. Surprise people. Surprise will get their interest. But to sustain their interest you have to stimulate their curiosity. The best way to do that is to pose questions or open up holes in people’s knowledge and then fill those holes, say the authors. Make the audience aware that they have a gap in their knowledge and then fill that gap with the answers to the puzzle (or guide them to the answers). Take people on a journey of discovery. (The Discovery Channel’s MythBusters is about the only thing I can watch on the virtually unwatchable boob-tube these days as the TV program does a wonderful job of posing questions and then answering them, often in quite unexpected ways.) http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2007/07/make.html
  • Stories. We tell stories all day long. It’s how humans have always communicated. We tell stories with our words and even with our art. We express ourselves through the stories we share. We teach, we learn, and we grow through stories. Why is it that when the majority of smart, talented people have the chance to present we usually get streams of information rather than story from them? Great ideas and great presentations have an element of story to them. But you see storytelling everywhere in the workplace. In Japan, for example, it’s a custom for a senior worker (sempai) to mentor a younger worker (kohai) on various issues concerning the company history and culture, and of course on how to do the job. The sempai does much of his informal teaching trough storytelling, though nobody calls it that. But that’s what it is. Once a younger worker hears the “story” of what happened to the poor guy who didn’t wear his hardhat on the factory floor one day he never forgets the lesson (and he never forgets to wear his hardhat). Stories get our attention and are easier to remember than lists of rules. http://www.presentationzen.com/presentationzen/2007/07/make.html
  • http://www.slideshare.net/thecroaker/death-by-powerpoint
  • http://www.slideshare.net/thecroaker/death-by-powerpoint
  • http://www.slideshare.net/thecroaker/death-by-powerpoint

Técnicas de-apresentao4724 Técnicas de-apresentao4724 Presentation Transcript

  • Técnicas e Melhores Práticas de Apresentação
  • Quem tem medo de Falar em Público? O Medo e a Timidez estão apenas dentro de nós ! Vídeo: O Vendedor de Celulares Dinâmica do segredo.
  • Dicas para o Apresentador
    • Fale devagar
    • Não coloque as mãos nos bolsos
    • Não cruze os braços
    • Não coloque os braços para trás
    • - Utilize a linguagem
    • do corpo
    • Faça a platéia pensar
    • Pergunte - Não fale sempre no mesmo tom
    • Crie empatia com o público
  • Falar devagar Dicas para Falar bem em Público Oratória
  • Verifique antecipadamente se a sala e os equipamentos estão OK.
  • http://www.presentationzen.com/ Apresentação em Grupo
  •  
    • - Mantenha a organização e harmonia do grupo e apresentação
    • Estabeleça a ordem da apresentação
    • Respeite a fala do outro, sem interrupções
    • Todos de frente a platéia
    • Manter a postura e auxilie
  • http://www.presentationzen.com/ Surpreenda a platéia
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  • http://www.presentationzen.com/ Use exemplos simples e reais, não abstratos. E não exagere nos exemplos.
  • http://www.presentationzen.com/ Tome cuidados com a Apresentação Pessoal
  • A aparência do palestrante é importante para a credibilidade?
  • Credibilidade
  • A apresentação é importante para gerar credibilidade? Qual dos dois Bigmacs você escolheria?
  • http://www.presentationzen.com/ Emoção
  • http://www.presentationzen.com/ As pessoas são seres emocionais.
    • Existem muitas formas de levar emoção através de conteúdo.
      • Imagens
      • Citações
      • Palavras
      • Texto
      • Gráficos
      • Vídeo, som, etc.
  • http://www.presentationzen.com/ PREPARE-SE: o próximo slide vai mexer com suas emoções!
  •  
  • http://www.presentationzen.com/ Use Histórias
  • / Histórias chamam nossa atenção e são mais fáceis de lembrar do que listas de regras.
  • http://www.presentationzen.com/ Use Recursos Áudio Visuais: Power Point ?
  • Regras para um design simples e atraente
  • http://www.presentationzen.com/ Use os slides como apoio…
  • http://www.presentationzen.com/ PoemaOrigem: Wikipédia, a enciclopédia livre. Ir para: navegação, pesquisa Um Poema é uma obra literária apresentada geralmente em verso e estrofes(ainda que possa existir prosa poética, assim designada pelo uso de temas específicos e de figuras de estilo próprias da poesia). Efectivamente, existe uma diferença entre poesia e poema. Este último, segundo vários autores, é uma obra em verso com características poéticas. Ou seja, enquanto o poema é um objecto literário com existência material concreta, a poesia tem um carácter imaterial e transcendente. Fortemente relacionado com a música, a poesia tem as suas raízes históricas nas letras de acompanhamento de peças musicais. Até a Idade Média, a poesia era cantada. Só depois o texto foi separado do acompanhamento musical. Tal como na música, o ritmo tem uma importância fulcral. Um poema também faz parte de um sarau (reuniões em casas particulares para expressar artes, músicas,poemas, poesias, etc). [editar] História Na Grécia antiga o poema foi a forma predominante de literatura. Os três gêneros (lírico, dramático e épico) eram escritos em forma de poesia. A narrativa, entretanto, foi tomando importância, ficando a poesia mais relacionada com o gênero lírico. Ainda hoje é feita esta associação entre poema, sentimentos e rimas.
  • Evite U s o e x c e s s ivo d e c o r e s
  • Evite o exagero de informações por slide
  • Poluição textos, imagens, fundo.
  • Evite O uso excessivo de diferentes fontes
  • Z Z Sanserif Serif Claro Confuso Evite fontes com serifa, são difíceis de ler no monitor, assim como em itálico .
  • EVITE: TEXTO EM CAIXA ALTA - É MAIS DIFÍCIL DE LER Use: em caixa baixa – É mais fácil
  • Esse texto é Arial 12 Esse texto é Arial 18 Esse texto é Arial 24 Esse texto é Arial 32 Esse texto é Arial 36 Esse texto é Arial 44 Texto pequeno demais
  • Quanto custa um slide extra? R$0,00. Zero.
  • Menos textos e mais imagens…
  • Fotos no lugar de cliparts
  • Profissional do futuro!
  • http://www.presentationzen.com/ Slide Tradicional Antes
  • a habilidade técnica : consiste em utilizar conhecimentos, métodos, técnicas e equipamentos necessários para realização de tarefas específicas por meio da experiência profissional http://www.presentationzen.com/ a habilidade humana : c onsiste na capacitação e discernimento para trabalhar com pessoas, comunicar, compreender suas atitudes e motivações e desenvolver uma liderança eficaz a habilidade conceitual : consiste na capacidade para lidar com idéias e conceitos abstratos. Essa habilidade permite que a pessoa faça abstrações e desenvolva filosofias e princípios gerais de ação Introdução ao Pensamento Gerencial  Horácio Soares 5/60 HABILIDADES DO ADMINISTRADOR
  • http://www.presentationzen.com/ Nova Proposta
  • http://www.presentationzen.com/ Habilidades do Administrador?
  • http://www.presentationzen.com/ Técnica
  • http://www.presentationzen.com/ Humana Técnica +
  • Conceitual Técnica + Humana +
  • Boa Apresentação exige: preparação!
  • O que não usar em uma apresentação de slides. Power Point Helenice Queiroz