Ncte VL_manga as entry texts

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  • Explain at this point that it is not a linear process.
  • Explain at this point that it is not a linear process.
  • Explain at this point that it is not a linear process.
  • Explain at this point that it is not a linear process.
  • Explain at this point that it is not a linear process.
  • Explain at this point that it is not a linear process.
  • Explain at this point that it is not a linear process.
  • Explain at this point that it is not a linear process.
  • Explain at this point that it is not a linear process.

Transcript

  • 1. Boys and visual literacy: Using manga as entry texts Prisca Rodriguez University of Florida [email_address] National Council of Teachers of English Teachers and Students Together: Living Literate Lives Orlando, FL November 18-21, 2010 Annual Convention
  • 2. Visual Literacy
    • There are many interests subsumed under the concept of "visual literacy", making it difficult to define, despite the commonplace understanding that it is the ability to make sense of visual symbols.
      • Creativity
      • Construction
      • Manipulation
      • An ability to communicate
      • "...the ability to understand and use images, including the ability to think, learn, and express oneself in terms of images (Braden and Hortin, 1982, p.41)
  • 3. VL in the classroom
    • Wilhelm emphasizes the greater reliance on images in the workforce, therefore schools at all levels must adapt their curricula and instructional practices to include visual literacy (2005).
    • “ Visual input has the ability to capture attention, and that attention is a prerequisite to learning” (Zambo and Brozo 2008, p.31).
  • 4. Using manga to reach reluctant readers
    • According to Zambo and Brozo, the biological difference in the eye structure of boys as compared to girls has implications that can be used to “sell” books to boys.
    • “ Young boys are drawn to books with plain illustrations, and young boys prefer comic books with male characters in exciting scenes more than books with sparkly illustrations”
  • 5. What is manga ?
    • In the United States, the term manga is used to refer to comic book style stories originally published in Japan.
    • However, manga -influenced comics are now being published in many parts of the world. In the United States, comics influenced by the original Japanese manga style are usually called Amerimanga .
  • 6. What is manga ?
    • Many people, adults and children alike, read manga as it becomes more popular in the United States.
    • There are several types of manga that cater to different audiences. For example:
      • Kodomo (for children)
      • Sh ō jo (for girls)
      • Sh ō nen (for boys)
      • Seinen (for young/adult men)
      • Josei (for young/adult women)
      • Etc.
  • 7. Sh ō nen manga
      • Published for boys ages 10-18 (approx.)
      • Characterized by:
        • Humor
        • Action
        • Camaraderie between boys/men
        • Detailed fight scenes
        • Usually printed in black and white
  • 8. Sh ō nen manga
    • Range of subjects include:
      • Science fiction
      • Fantasy
      • Comedy
      • Mystery
      • Horror
      • Sports
      • Realistic fiction
      • Historical fiction
      • Etc.
  • 9. Manga examples
    • Pok é mon (fantasy)
      • A young boy seeks to be the best pok é mon trainer in the world.
    • Labels
      • Confidence
      • Cooperation
      • Honesty
      • Perseverance
  • 10. Manga examples
    • Naruto (action/fantasy)
      • Naruto is an outcast in his village and does not know why. When he is tricked into stealing a sacred scroll he finds out that a demon fox spirit has been sealed inside him. Despite this, he vows to become the greatest ninja in the world.
    • Labels
      • Courage
      • Perseverance
      • Survival
      • Confidence
  • 11. Manga examples
    • Fullmetal Alchemist (fantasy)
      • Two brothers further their studies in alchemy in an effort to bring their mother back from the dead, with terrible consequences. Now they must search for a way to get their original bodies back!
    • Labels
      • Family
      • Responsibility
      • Courage
      • Perseverance
  • 12. Manga examples
    • Cirque Du Freak (fiction)
      • Based on the books by Darren Shan. A young boy and his friend go to a secret midnight circus full of freakish creatures. Too late do they realize that they should not have messed with the resident vampire. Their antics lead to tragic consequences.
    • Labels
      • Responsibility
      • Survival
      • Honesty
  • 13. Manga examples
    • Initial D (fiction)
      • A young man has become an expert in driving in perilous conditions, which makes him perfect for mountain racing.
    • Labels
      • Confidence
      • Perseverance
  • 14. Manga examples
    • Harlem Beat (realistic fiction)
      • A boy tries to be the best basketball player and wants to join his school team. When the moment comes, however, he misses his opportunity, but his passion for the game takes him to play in the streets.
    • Labels
      • Perseverance
      • Courage
      • Confidence
  • 15. Manga examples
    • Rurouni Kenshin
    • (historical fiction)
      • An ex-samurai decides to protect the people of Japan and prevent an old comrade from overthrowing the Meiji Government
    • Labels
      • Courage
      • Responsibility
      • Perseverance
      • Survival
  • 16. Manga examples
    • The Manga Cook Book
      • This book features recipes found in popular manga titles
  • 17. Manga examples
    • Monster (mystery)
      • A compassionate doctor saves the life of a young boy who later becomes a murderer. As he searches for answers, he discovers the government’s secret to create “perfect soldiers”.
    • Label
      • Generosity
      • Responsibility
      • Valuing diversity
  • 18. Limitations and possibilities
    • Limitations
      • Not all libraries are well stocked with current manga titles
      • Many manga , such as Naruto and Fullmetal Alchemist, are serialized in many volumes, which might intimidate readers
  • 19. Limitations and possibilities
    • Possibilities
      • Detailed visuals attract boys’ attention
      • Manga can be used as an entry text for reluctant readers
      • Many manga titles are animated
      • Many popular manga titles are now novels
  • 20. References
    • Arakawa, H. (2005). Fullmetal alchemist v1 . San Francisco, CA: Viz.
    • Braden, R.A., & Hortin, J.A. (1982). Identifying the theoretical foundations of visual literacy. Journal of Visual Verbal Languaging, 2(2), 37-51.
    • Ishihara, Y. (2007). The manga cookbook . Ill. Hatori, C. Canada: Manga University Culinary Institute.
    • Nishiyama, Y. (1999). Harlem beat v1 . Los Angeles, CA: Tokyopop.
    • Kishimoto, M. (1999). Naruto v1. San Francisco, CA: Shonen Jump.
    • Kusaka, H. (2008). Pokémon. (Mato, Illus.). San Francisco, CA: VIZ Media.
    • Shan, D. (2009). Cirque Du Freak. Ill. Arai, T. New York: Yen Press.
    • Shigeno, S. (2002). Initial D v1. Los Angeles, CA: Tokyopop.
    • Takahashi, R. (2004). InuYasha v33. San Francisco, CA: Viz.
    • Urasawa, N. (2006). Monster v1. San Francisco, CA: Viz.
    • Watsuki, N. (1994). Rurouni Kenshin v7. San Francisco, CA: Viz.
    • Wilhelm, L. (2005). Increasing visual literacy skills with digital imagery. T.H.E. Journal, 32(7), 24, 26-7.
    • Yatate, H. (1999). Cowboy Bebop v3. Ill. Nanten, Y. Los Angeles, CA: Tokyopop.
    • Zambo, D. & Brozo, W. (2008). Bright beginnings for boys: Engaging young boys in active literacy . Newark, Delaware: International Reading Association.