Consumer Behaviour-Attitude

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  • All notes for the slides are suggestions only. The slides and notes are to be used by lecturer/facilitator in a way that best suits their needs.
  • Activity : A sk students to identify changing consumer attitude trends and how this might affect appeals us ed in m arketing messages .
  • Ask students about their attitudes toward particular brands. What would change their attitudes towards these brands? Discuss the differences between those with weaker or stronger attitudes . For example, Ford v s Holden – how strongly do you feel?
  • Consumer Behaviour-Attitude

    1. 1. ATTITUDES 9Copyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd
    2. 2. AttitudesAt the end of this session, you should understand:• The nature and characteristics of attitudes and their influence over consumer behaviour• The ways in which consumer attitudes are formed• The application of attitude theories to consumer behaviour• The functions of attitudes• How consumer attitudes can be measured• The processes and methods used to change consumer attitudesCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9-2
    3. 3. Attitudes - defined• An attitude may be defined as a learned predisposition to respond in a consistently favourable or unfavourable manner with respect to a given objectCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9-3
    4. 4. The nature of attitudes• Attitudes vary in their strength• Attitudes reflect a consumer’s values• Attitudes are learned• Different situations influence attitudesCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9-4
    5. 5. Consumer attitude trends• By keeping in touch with changing consumer attitudes, marketers are better able to appeal to consumers through their marketing messages and appeals• Check out the ‘Eye on Australia’ report at www.greyglobalgroup.com for information on changing consumer trendsCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9-5
    6. 6. How are attitudes formed?• Conditioning – Learning can occur from repeated exposure to stimuli – We are more likely to develop a positive attitude towards behaviour that continually brings rewards• Modelling – Develop attitudes by watching others that we trust or respect• Cognitive Learning – Involves problem solving or reaching logical conclusions based on informationCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9-6
    7. 7. Attitude models• Two main attitude models: – Tri-component model – Fishbein’s multi-attribute modelCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9-7
    8. 8. The tri-component model of attitudesCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9-8
    9. 9. The tri-component model of attitudes• Attitudes are generally considered to be made up of three elements: – Affective component  Feelings  Based on physiological nervous reactions to an object – Cognitive component  Beliefs  What a person believes to be true about an idea, event, person, activity or object – Behavioural intentions  An observable reaction  e.g. to purchase a particular brandCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9-9
    10. 10. Fishbein’s multi-attribute model ofattitudes• Assumes that attitudes often have many attributes that influence them• (The tri-component model assesses a person’s attitude to only one attribute of the attitude)• Differs from tri-component model in 4 main areas: – Focuses mainly on the affect component – Considers the strength of multiple attributes – Suggests that attitude affects intentions and this leads to behaviour – Measures strength of attributesCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9- 10
    11. 11. Fishbein’s multi-attribute model ofattitudesAttitude identification involves: 1. Identifying the attitude 2. Determining consumer intention, based on their attitudes 3. Predicting behaviour based on intentionsCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9- 11
    12. 12. Functions of attitudesAttitudes have 4 main functions: 1. Adjustment function – Attitudes help consumers adjust to situations – People seek out group acceptance in order to gain praise or rewards and avoid punishment 2. Ego defensive function – Attitudes are formed to protect the ‘ego’ 3. Value expressive function – A consumer’s attitudes are often a reflection of their values 4. Knowledge function – Attitudes help consumers make decisions and process and filter informationCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9- 12
    13. 13. Attitude measurement• Identify consumer’s salient (most important) beliefs about the object in questionCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9- 13
    14. 14. Attitude measurement tools• Likert scales – Used to measure attitudes by offering respondents a list of attitude statements, for example: Colgate is a brand I can trust. 1. Strongly Disagree 2. Disagree 3. Neither Agree nor Disagree 4. Agree 5. Strongly AgreeCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9- 14
    15. 15. Attitude measurement tools• Semantic differential scales – Uses a 7-point rating scale with bipolar labels at the end points – Tends to measure a person’s beliefs about a product, for example: Pleasant taste Unpleasant taste Low priced High pricedCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9- 15
    16. 16. Attitude measurement tools• Measuring purchase intention – Used to measure whether a consumer is likely to purchase a particular product, for example 1. How often do you usually purchase Colgate toothpaste?  Weekly  Once a month  Once every few months  Very occasionally 2. How likely are you to buy Colgate toothpaste in the next 3 months?  Highly likely to buy  Probably will buy  Might buy  Probably will not buy  Definitely will not buyCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9- 16
    17. 17. Attitude change• Two conditions must exist to allow for attitude change: – The object of the attitude must no longer provide the satisfaction that it once did – Attitudes can change when the consumer’s aspirations change• Attitude change occurs when one of the three elements of attitude (affect, cognition, behaviour) undergoes a changeCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9- 17
    18. 18. Attitude change via affect(influencing feelings)• Conditioning – Build up positive feelings through rewards, positive music or emotive symbols• Feelings towards advertisement/communication – If you like the advertisement, there is a greater chance you’ll like the product – Using well-liked celebrities• Mere exposure – Just showing an advertisement or communication to consumers can lead to a positive attitudeCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9- 18
    19. 19. Attitude change via cognitions(influencing beliefs)• Changing consumer’s See EXHIBIT 9.6 Dairy Australia and The Wiggles work together to reinforce the beliefs about the need for children to have three serves of dairy every day, page 266. attributes of a brand PowerPoint slides supplied on the Instructor Resource CD to accompany – Providing information Consumer Behaviour include about the brand advertisement images.Copyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9- 19
    20. 20. Attitude change via cognitions(influencing beliefs)• Influencing consumers See EXHIBIT 9.7 Nutella is positioned as an ‘energy’ food rather than just a to change the tasty spread, page 266. importance of beliefs PowerPoint slides supplied on the about the product Instructor Resource CD to accompany Consumer Behaviour include advertisement images. – Communicate the importance of other attributesCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9- 20
    21. 21. Attitude change via cognitions(influencing beliefs)• Changing consumer See EXHIBIT 9.8 Blackmores is the ‘ideal’ brand, according to this advertisement, page beliefs about the ‘ideal’ 267. brand PowerPoint slides supplied on the Instructor Resource CD to accompany Consumer – Specify what should be Behaviour include advertisement images. most important about the brandCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9- 21
    22. 22. Attitude change via cognitions(influencing beliefs)• Adding new beliefs See EXHIBIT 9.9 Most front loaders are small, but LG front loaders have a very about the brand large capacity, page 267. – ‘Did you know that….?’ PowerPoint slides supplied on the Instructor Resource CD to accompany Consumer Behaviour include advertisement images.Copyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9- 22
    23. 23. Changing attitudes by encouraginga change in behaviour• Attitudes can change as a result of behaviour• Encourage consumers to try your product. For example, with samples or tastingsCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9- 23
    24. 24. Changing attitudes by changingwhat is ‘normal’• Changing what is viewed as normal in a situation• For example, attitudes to red meat have changed as a result of campaigns emphasising the benefits of eating red meatCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9- 24
    25. 25. Influences on attitude formation andchange• Source credibility – Attractiveness – Expertise – Trustworthiness• Message characteristics• Media characteristics• Receiver characteristicsCopyright  2005 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 9- 25

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