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Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
Using objects in the classroom
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Using objects in the classroom

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PowerPoint for Primary Source/BCM Teaching with Artifacts workshop on using objects in the classroom.

PowerPoint for Primary Source/BCM Teaching with Artifacts workshop on using objects in the classroom.

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • Makah c. 1900
  • Wampanoag Hickory Wood
  • Peabody Number: 44-19-10/27264 Acoma Ceramic Bowl Basket
  • TitleMakah woman known as Maria (wife of Tatoosh) holding infant, Washington, in engraving made 1792
  • TitleMakah girls called Martha, Fanny, and Ellen at Neah Bay, Washington, ca. 1865
  • Makah Drying Fish 1900
  • TitleMakah boy plays the organ in class, Neah Bay, Washington, ca. 1903
  • Makah 1905
  • Makah 1910
  • Makah woman with gathering basket, Washington, 1910
  • Makah 1911
  • Makah 1915
  • TitleMakahs gather for a potlatch, Neah Bay, Washington, ca. 1923
  • Makah 1941
  • Makah 1964
  • Makah 1990s
  • Makah Day 1995
  • Makah Days 2009
  • Acoma 1898
  • 1899 Acoma
  • Acoma Pueblo 1926
  • Acoma 1929
  • Acoma 1930s
  • Acoma 1930s
  • Acoma Pueblo 1941 Ansel Adams
  • Ansel Adams Acoma Pueblo Church 1941
  • Hillary Clinton at Acoma 1999
  • Acoma 200s
  • Acoma Pueblo Cultural Center Museum 2010s
  • 400 – 600 AD Pueblo Utah
  • Potawatomi [Prairie Band, Kansas]1870
  • Oklahoma Shawnee 1890
  • Kiawa Oklahoma 1890s women’s moccasins
  • Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet) Girls leggings moccasins 1900 ceremonial
  • 1910 men’s boots Alaska
  • Alberta Canada 1910
  • 1920 Ojibewa
  • 1940 Mexico
  • 1970 Canda
  • Mukluks 1983 Alaska
  • 2000 Minnesota Chippewa
  • 2010 Yakima Washington State
  • Transcript

    • 1. “But, I Don’t Have Artifacts!”: Resources for Teaching Native Cultures and Object-based Learning in the Classroom Ann Marie Gleeson, Primary Source
    • 2. Chronological Thinking Place the images in approximate chronological order. What is the topic of your set of images? What inferences can you make from this progression of images? What connections can students make about change over time? What skills does this activity address?
    • 3. The Makah Peoples
    • 4. 1792
    • 5. 1865
    • 6. 1900
    • 7. 1903
    • 8. 1905
    • 9. 1910
    • 10. 1910
    • 11. 1911
    • 12. 1915
    • 13. 1923
    • 14. 1941
    • 15. 1964
    • 16. 1990s
    • 17. 1995
    • 18. 2009
    • 19. Acoma Pueblo
    • 20. 1898
    • 21. 1899
    • 22. 1926
    • 23. 1929
    • 24. 1930s
    • 25. 1930s
    • 26. 1941
    • 27. 1941
    • 28. 1999 (Hillary Clinton at Acoma)
    • 29. 2006
    • 30. 2010
    • 31. Native Footwear
    • 32. 400 – 600 AD Pueblo (Utah)
    • 33. 1870 Kansas
    • 34. 1890 Shawnee Oklahoma
    • 35. 1890s Oklahoma
    • 36. 1900 Blackfoot ceremonial
    • 37. 1910 Alaska
    • 38. 1910 Canada
    • 39. 1920 Ojibewa
    • 40. 1940 Mexico
    • 41. 1970 Canada
    • 42. 1983 Alaska
    • 43. 2000 Minnesota Chippewa
    • 44. 2010 Yakima Washington State
    • 45. Chronological Thinking How did you make your decisions? What evidence did you use? How did you use objects?
    • 46. Chronological Thinking Change over time Contemporary Images Object analysis purpose, detail work, climate/geography/raw materials, art, used today, tourism
    • 47. Making Connections Without the Actual Artifact Images of the object Bring in contemporary objects or reproductions Show images/videos of how it was made or used Use sample raw materials Artifact Kits
    • 48. Cedar Bark http://www.sfu.museum/time/en/panoramas/beach/bark/43/ http://www.sfu.museum/time/en/panoramas/beach/bark-stripping/44/
    • 49. Cedar Bark http://www.sfu.museum/time/en/panoramas/beach/uses-of-cedar-bark/47/ http://www.sfu.museum/time/en/panoramas/beach/uses-of-cedar-bark/48/
    • 50. Resources https://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=1054119

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