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4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
4th Grade Geography Workshop
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4th Grade Geography Workshop

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Transcript

  • 1. Do Now: Draw the World
  • 2. Flemish cartographer Gerardus Mercator’s 1569 map of the world.
  • 3. Gall-Peter’s Projection Map
  • 4. Geography in the Elementary Classroom Ann Marie Gleeson Primary Source April 8, 2014
  • 5. Agenda and Goals  How can we incorporate spatial thinking into ELA and social studies instruction? 1. Literacy and the Significance of Place 2. Social Studies Inquiry, Claims, and Evidence 3. Resources
  • 6. 4th Grade Geography  In what ways do you address geographic concepts in your teaching?
  • 7. Geographic Concepts/Terms  Place  Climate  Physical Features  Movement  Resources  Natural Resources  Culture  Community  Environment  Landforms  Water  Political Boundaries  States  Cities  Maps  Scale  Location  Population  People  Systems  Lens to interpret past, present, and plan for future
  • 8. Geographic Representations By the end of Grade 5  Construct maps and other graphic representations of both familiar and unfamiliar places.  Use maps, satellite images, photographs, and other representations to explain relationships between the locations of places and regions and their environmental characteristics.  Use maps of different scales to describe the locations of cultural and environmental characteristics. National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS), The College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards: Guidance for Enhancing the Rigor of K-12 Civics, Economics, Geography, and History (Silver Spring, MD: NCSS, 2013).
  • 9. Human-Environment Interaction By the end of Grade 5  Explain how culture influences the way people modify and adapt to their environments.  Explain how the cultural and environmental characteristics of places change over time.  Describe how environmental and cultural characteristics influence population distribution in specific places or regions. National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS), The College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards: Guidance for Enhancing the Rigor of K-12 Civics, Economics, Geography, and History (Silver Spring, MD: NCSS, 2013).
  • 10. Human Population By the end of Grade 5  Explain how cultural and environmental characteristics affect the distribution and movement of people, goods, and ideas.  Explain how human settlements and movements relate to the locations and use of various natural resources.  Analyze the effects of catastrophic environmental and technological events on human settlements and migration. National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS), The College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards: Guidance for Enhancing the Rigor of K-12 Civics, Economics, Geography, and History (Silver Spring, MD: NCSS, 2013).
  • 11. Global Interconnections By the end of Grade 5  Explain why environmental characteristics vary among different world regions.  Describe how the spatial patterns of economic activities in a place change over time because of interactions with nearby and distant places.  Explain how natural and human-made catastrophic events in one place affect people living in other places. National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS), The College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards: Guidance for Enhancing the Rigor of K-12 Civics, Economics, Geography, and History (Silver Spring, MD: NCSS, 2013).
  • 12. Literacy and the Significance of Place
  • 13. Spatial Thinking and Literacy 1. Read the text. 2. Identify all the places where geographic concepts are present or connection that you could make to U.S. regions. 3. Create text-dependent questions related to geographic concepts for students reading this text.
  • 14. Key Ideas and Details: According to the article, why were skyscrapers built? Use words and phrases from the text to support your answer. (Paragraphs 6, 7, 8, 9) Craft and Structure: In paragraph 3, the author describes the skyscraper as “a silent but forcible evidence of Yankee inventive genius, of the rapid progress in the New World.” What does the word “Yankee” mean in this sentence? What is the author trying to say in this sentence? Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: How did population density affect the development of cities in the northeast?
  • 15. Additional Resources  U.S. Census Bureau Maps: http://www.census.gov/geo/maps- data/maps/thematic.html  BPL Digital Map Collection: http://maps.bpl.org/  Google Lit Trips: http://www.googlelittrips.com/GoogleLit/Home.html  Google TourBuilder: https://tourbuilder.withgoogle.com/  Scribble Maps: http://www.scribblemaps.com/
  • 16. Analyzing Maps  Library of Congress Map Analysis Guide: http://www.loc.gov/teachers/usingprimarysources/resour ces/Analyzing_Maps.pdf  Library of Congress Map Collections: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/browse/ListSome.php?c ategory=Maps
  • 17. http://www.loc.gov/item/2011589045/
  • 18. Social Studies Inquiry, Claims, and Evidence
  • 19. Inquiry, Claims, Evidence 1. Examine the primary source set. 2. Make a claim about a U.S. region based on the documents. 3. Identify evidence to support your claim.  How might you use these primary source sets to help students make connections to place?
  • 20. Additional Resources  National Geographic Common Core Connections: http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/m edia/common-core-ela-geography- connections/?ar_a=1  Google Maps Gallery: https://maps.google.com/gallery/  Google Maps Street View Treks: http://www.google.com/maps/about/behind-the- scenes/streetview/treks/  National Museum of the American Indian Infinity of Nations: http://nmai.si.edu/exhibitions/infinityofnations/
  • 21. Wrap-Up: Your Classroom  http://blnds.co/1jLusrV  How might you use some of these resources or strategies with your students?

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