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What were once vices are now habits: Med 2.0 2008-2013
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What were once vices are now habits: Med 2.0 2008-2013

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Overview of content presented at Med 2.0 conferences and how it correlates with developments in health care and society

Overview of content presented at Med 2.0 conferences and how it correlates with developments in health care and society

Published in: Business, Technology

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  • 1. What were once vices …………..are now habits Med 2.0: 2008-2013
  • 2. 2 ▸ Introduction and disclosure ▸ Pat Rich ▸ Director, cma.ca ▸ @cmaer ▸ Delegate and speaker at all Med 2.0 conferences
  • 3. 3 “From my point of view, the emergence of mobile and ubiquitous computing becoming mainstream is perhaps the biggest thing …” Gunther Eysenbach
  • 4. 4 “E-health research and social media research are … becoming almost mainstream, and are present in many other conferences where they were absent a few years ago. This is probably a general reflection of changing real-world practice.” Peter Murray
  • 5. 5 “Great variation at each meeting as well as over time. The growing attention to use of research methodologies adapted to the specific challenges in e-health is promising.” Dr. Sam Nordfeldt
  • 6. 6 The evolution of Medicine 2.0 Predecessor: Brighton, 1996 – The European Congress of the Internet in Medicine (MedNet 96) “The last few years have seen an unprecedented increase in the number of individuals and institutions using the Internet particularly with the developments of the World-Wide-Web (WWW) which the medical community and healthcare industries have not been excluded from.”
  • 7. 7 The Evolution of Medicine 2.0  2008 - MedNet 2008 – St. Petersburg, Russia (last MedNet conference)  2008 - Medicine 2.0 - World Congress on Social Networking and Web 2.0 Applications in Medicine, Health, Health Care, and Biomedical Research – Toronto  2009, Toronto; 2010, Maastricht  2011 – Medicine 2.0 – World Congress on Social Media, Mobile Apps, Internet/Web 2.0 – Stanford  2012, Boston; 2013 - London
  • 8. 8 Medicine 2.0 Consistent themes  The Internet for health communications/education  Online communities/engaged patients  Social media for communications, research, education and community-building Emergent themes  Twitter  Mobile health and mobile health applications
  • 9. 9 2008 – Providing the framework “Medicine 2.0: Social Networking, Collaboration, Participation, Apomediation and Openness” JMIR Editorial and opening address Social uses of personal health information within PatientsLikeMe Study of the ePatient as a provider of health content in the Internet
  • 10. 10 2009 - Toronto E-patient Dave and patient advocacy CMA/CPD 2.0 Are We Close? Pandemics in the Age of Twitter – Twitter ER Hospital Adoption of Med 2.0 – a Culture Shift
  • 11. 11 2010 – Maastricht “Porting a Clinical Mobile Device Application from iPhone to Android Using Online Collaboration: a Case Study Using Neuromind” “The Proof of the Pudding: First Results of a Primary Care Consultation Service on Twitter”
  • 12. 12 • The Stanford ePatient Forum • The Meaningful Use of Social Media By Physicians • Closing address: Susannah Fox, Pew Internet
  • 13. 13 2012 – Boston A View of Online Communities Across Stages of Life: Current Research and Future Trends Two top Tweeters both physicians
  • 14. 14 Medicine 2.0 – 2008-2013 Pub Med – Title + Abstract  Mobile Health and health care/medicine  2008 – 13 references  2013 (8 months) – 75 references  Mobile health apps and health care/medicine  2008 – 1  2010 – 2  2013 (8 months) – 14  Twitter and health/care medicine  2008 – 1  2010 - 17  2013 (8 months) – 35
  • 15. 15 Twitter use at Medicine 2.0 “Medicine 2.0'09 provided extra screens to broadcast the twitter stream live to the conference audience. Did you like the idea” 2011 - Stanford (3 days) 8,560 Tweets - 880 Tweeters 80 Tweets/hr. 2012 – Harvard (2 days) 7,236 Tweets - 842 Tweeters 101 Tweets/hr. Source: Symplur.com
  • 16. 16 Increasing support for  Patient participation  Patients sharing personal experiences  Patient access to information and personal data  Professionals’ sharing of knowledge and experiences  Professionals’ growing interest in patients as a great resource  Platform and application enhanced trends related to rapid tech development e g smartphones – Sam Nordfeldt
  • 17. 17 The use of social media has become much more widespread among (some sectors of) health/care professionals and organizations - as one would have expected. However, I think many are still struggling to find a real value for using social media. Peter Murray
  • 18. 18 2006 * Few or no guidelines for social media use by MDs * Little awareness of e-patient advocacy *Few surveys of SM use in health care * Little published research
  • 19. 19 2013 * Numerous guidelines for physicians on SM use * Three major conferences on SM and medicine (Med 2.0, Doctors 2.0, StanfordX) * National survey of Cdn MD –SM use in 2014 * US meaningful use legislation re: pt engagement
  • 20. 20 Conclusion Medicine 2.0 has become the norm for some in terms of working environment and beliefs but not the majority. Thank you