Leading youth to advocate   combined 2-4-14
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  • I have always tried to teach with the assumption that my mom is in the audience. I want to keep it basic enough that she will understand it, but true enough that it will work. <br />
  • Give example of MCRUDs position papers meeting state & IRS criteria, but funders were uncomfortable. <br />
  • Chart paper activity …list opportunities <br /> LCC semi-annual comment hearings <br /> LCC hearings on specific local businesses <br /> School Board meetings <br /> Kent County commission <br /> GR city Council <br /> Community Mental Health Commission meetings <br />
  • Can any of you think of a situation where a youth may have said something that among two adults may be inappropriate but you knew exactly what they were talking about. Donovan example about choosing the name of the group in Gd. Ledge. <br /> Include lots of examples; make it interactive; include pictures, graphics, physical examples (products, posters, something); decide on what resources we are going to share. <br />
  • Show “Nuvo Poster” and the Cannabis can as examples of products that youth probably are more likely to know about these products than adults. <br />
  • In California, the girl scouts were very involved an legislative efforts to make fmbs less available. <br />
  • Exercise: How many of you know the name of your U.S. Representative? For those that don’t, the first person that can give us the answer will win a prize. <br /> U.S. Speaker of the House – John Boehner (R – OH)/ Senate Majority Leader – Harry Reid (D-NV) <br />
  • Quiz audience on who these players are? In Michigan there are quite a few officials that are considered “lobbyable public officials.” <br />
  • Who is the President of the school board? Chair of your county commission? Whatever system you are working you need to know the process and the players. How does your school board or city council operate? Who are the key people that can help you move forward on your issue? <br />
  • Identify short and long term goals; Define goals in a way that can launch an effort and draw people. <br /> Identify the people and institutions you need to move – those with formal authority (policymakers) and those with the capacity to influence the formal authority (media, key constituents) <br /> Different audiences need different messages. Two basic components: an appeal to what’s right and an appeal to the audience’s self interest. <br />
  • 4. Example of public health and law enforcement being the messenger instead of Beer and Wine Wholesalers Association. Youth make great messengers. <br />
  • Treat the media as a dating relationship. If they hear from you once per year, they won’t be as inclined to follow your story. If you give them what they need to do their job, you might get a call back. <br />

Leading youth to advocate   combined 2-4-14 Leading youth to advocate combined 2-4-14 Presentation Transcript

  • LEADING YOUTH TO ADVOCACY The HOW and WHY of working with youth to create community change For Wedgwood Christian Services of Grand Rapids Mike Tobias, CPS Ken Dail Prevention Network Michigan Wednesday, February 5, 2014
  • Today’s goals 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Define lobbying and advocating Exploring why we should involve youth Exploring who makes the rules/who to advocate to Outlining how to engage youth Identifying an issue Creating a game plan Using the media throughout the process
  • Lobbying vs. Advocating Issue identification & game plan Engaging Youth Why involve youth? Who are Decision Makers
  • Lobbying vs. Advocating Issue identification & game plan Why Media Advocacy & involve youth? Relationship Building Engaging Youth Who are Decision Makers
  • But first… sponsors …A word from our
  • But first… sponsors …A word from our Environmental Prevention 101
  • 10 Volunteers
  • Environment How does policy impact use rates?
  • Environment How does policy impact use rates? Norms
  • Environment How does policy impact use rates? Norms What are “they” doing? Bellbottoms vs. Corduroys vs. Boot cut jeans
  • Environment How does policy impact use rates? Norms What are “they” doing? Bellbottoms vs. Corduroys vs. Boot cut jeans Access
  • Environment How does policy impact use rates? Norms What are “they” doing? Bellbottoms vs. Corduroys vs. Boot cut jeans Access How easy is it to get something? Water in the desert vs. water in this room
  • Environment How does policy impact use rates? Norms What are “they” doing? Bellbottoms vs. Corduroys vs. Boot cut jeans Access How easy is it to get something? Water in the desert vs. water in this room Policy & Enforcement
  • Environment How does policy impact use rates? Norms What are “they” doing? Bellbottoms vs. Corduroys vs. Boot cut jeans Access How easy is it to get something? Water in the desert vs. water in this room Policy & Enforcement What are the rules and what if I break them?
  • Environment How does policy impact use rates? Norms What are “they” doing? Bellbottoms vs. Corduroys vs. Boot cut jeans Access How easy is it to get something? Water in the dessert vs. water in this room Policy & Enforcement What are the rues and what if I break them? What happens when these three are not in sync with one another?
  • Section 1 Defining lobbying and advocating
  • What is Advocating? Speaking up for something you believe in.
  • What is Lobbying? Advocating to someone who is in a position to change a policy or procedure to make it favorable towards something you believe in.
  • There are two essential questions that need to be addressed: 1.Is it legal for our agency to Lobby? 2.How do we lobby and stay legal?
  • Is it legal for our agency to lobby? Yes, it is legal for 501 (c)(3) agencies to lobby. There are no laws at the state or federal level that prohibit 501 (c)(3) agencies from lobbying. You will need to keep track of your lobbying expenses, because there are limits on the amount you are allowed to spend on lobbying. There are also limitations set by some funding partners as to whether or not you can use their money to lobby.
  • What is lobbying? There are 4 entities responsible for defining lobbying in the state of Michigan:
  • What is lobbying? There are 4 entities responsible for defining lobbying in the state of Michigan: 1.Internal Revenue Service
  • What is lobbying? There are 4 entities responsible for defining lobbying in the state of Michigan: 1.Internal Revenue Service 2.Michigan Law - Michigan Lobby Registration Act
  • What is lobbying? There are 4 entities responsible for defining lobbying in the state of Michigan: 1.Internal Revenue Service 2.Michigan Law - Michigan Lobby Registration Act 3.Your Supervisor/Board of Directors/Board of Trustees
  • What is lobbying? There are 4 entities responsible for defining lobbying in the state of Michigan: 1.Internal Revenue Service 2.Michigan Law - Michigan Lobby Registration Act 3.Your Supervisor/Board of Directors/Board of Trustees 4.Your funding partner(s)
  • Internal Revenue Service Definition of Lobbying: Lobbying is an attempt to influence legislation through direct contact with public officials at the local, state, and federal levels or indirectly by appealing to officials through the general public.
  • Michigan Lobbying Act Definition of Lobbying: Lobbying is any direct contact with a lobbyable pubic official, whether face to face, by telephone, letter, electronic media or any other means, the purpose of which is to influence the officials legislative or administrative actions. (By this definition, only state-level officials are lobbyable officials.)
  • Lobbyable Public Officials • Lobbyable public officials are essentially those persons, defined under statute, who may use personal discretion in deciding whether or not to engage in some type of legislative or administrative action.
  • Lobbyable Public Officials • This includes an individual who is elected or appointed and has not yet taken office, or an individual who is nominated for appointment to, any of the offices or agencies enumerated in this subsection
  • In Michigan there are a lot of people that fall in this category • Governor and Lieutenant Governor • Secretary of State • Attorney General • a classified director, chief deputy director, or deputy director of a state department • the legislature • the auditor general, the deputy auditor general
  • In Michigan there are a lot of people that fall in this category • an employee of the consumer's council • the director of the legislative retirement system, or any other employee of the legislature other than an individual employed by the state in a clerical or non-policy-making capacity • the director of the legislative retirement system • any other employee of the legislature other than an individual employed by the state in a clerical or non-policy-making capacity
  • What are some examples of lobbying? • Writing your State Representative asking them to raise the beer tax (Michigan and IRS) • Calling the Liquor Control Commission to encourage them to take a position on an administrative action (Michigan) • Attending a Liquor Control Commission public hearing and asking them to ban a certain brand or category of alcohol beverage (Michigan and IRS) • Attending a city council meeting to ask to have the curfew changed. (IRS)
  • What are some examples of advocating? • Posting on your personal Facebook page that you think the legal drinking age should be 25. • Asking your boss for a raise. • Asking your parents to change the family curfew. • Recognizing an elected official for their service or for supporting or opposing a law that has already passed.
  • What are some examples of advocating? • Contacting ANY elected official and letting them know you or your agency are available as a resource on your topic of expertise. • Contacting a store manager or owner to discuss their policies and procedures regarding alcohol or tobacco sales. • Contacting your local or state Chamber of Commerce to discuss state-wide policies and procedures regarding alcohol or tobacco sales.
  • What are some examples of advocating? • Sending a letter to the editor regarding a recent event and how alcohol played a role at the event. • Seeing your State or Federal Representative at a local community event and discussing with them how proposed or passed legislation will impact your community, family, the general public, or your agency. (Whoops…this is really lobbying, but you would be on your own time.)
  • How do we lobby and stay legal? There are two ways to chose from to track and potentially report your lobbying expenses.
  • How do we measure and report expenses? • The Insubstantial Part Test – • The Expenditure Test –
  • How do we measure and report expenses? • The Insubstantial Part Test – a public charity’s lobbying activities cannot constitute a substantial part of the organization’s total activities and expenditures. This is the default standard that will be used, unless your organization choose to use: • The Expenditure Test – This choice clearly defines lobbying and measures an organization’s lobbying activity based only on the amount of money spent for lobbying. There are specific limits to how much can be spent lobbying, depending on the size of your organization’s budget. You must actively choose to use this standard of measurement.
  • IS IT LOBBYING ? worksheet
  • Opportunities to educate, advocate, or lobby. …your ideas here
  • TAKE A BREAK
  • Section 2 Why involve youth ?
  • Why Involve Youth in Policy/Advocacy Work? • Less agenda driven; more candid and authentic • Sometimes more credible than adults and people working in the field • Their passion, enthusiasm, and energy make them great messengers • Because they want to make a difference in the lives of their peers (i.e. PA125’12 Medical Amnesty)
  • Why Involve Youth continued… • Possibly less restrictions on what they can do or say • Policymakers like pictures of themselves with smiling youth • Because they know what’s going on!
  • What’s In It For Them? • Builds resume - potential references and demonstrates volunteerism • Social rewards - meet other like minded teens • Develop leadership, advocacy, and public speaking skills that will last them a lifetime
  • What’s In It For Them continued… • Better understanding of how the world works • Affirmation that a drug free lifestyle is the way to go • An opportunity to help create their own environment
  • Ways to Involve Youth • Meeting with policymakers and key leaders in the community. • Have them help collect data through surveys and interviews. • Assist with events - registration, welcoming attendees, presenting information, master/mistress of ceremony
  • Ways to Involve Youth continued… • Have them serve on your board, steering, or advisory committees • Testifying before the school board, city council, Michigan Liquor Control Commission, etc…
  • Examples Where Youth Made A Difference • Michigan’s efforts to ban alcohol energy drinks • Perry youth lobbying the school board regarding their guest policy and about having a freshman soccer team • Dover Youth to Youth • PA 125’12 – Medical Amnesty Law
  • Shortcut to bradjanettestifying.lnk
  • Section 3 Who makes the rules and who do we advocate to?
  • Avenues for Advocacy and Lobbying •Local •State •Federal These can be formal or informal.
  • Who are the policymakers? • At the Federal Level? • President/Vice President • U.S. Senator • U.S. Representative • Speaker of the House/Senate Majority Leader • Committee Chair
  • State Level
  • State Level • Governor Snyder • Lieutenant Governor Calley • Your Representative/Senator • Speaker/Majority Leader • Key committee chairs • Michigan Liquor Control Commissioners
  • Local Level • Mayor; City/village council • City Council and School Board Committee Chairs • School board; Principal; Superintendent • County Commissioners and administrators • Classroom teacher; lunch room monitor
  • Local level continued… • Parents; other family members; babysitter; other care givers • Business owners; Store managers; regional managers • Prosecutor; Chief of police; Sheriff
  • Champions, stakeholders, messengers • Regardless of level, assess the policymakers and find the champion(s). • Identify stakeholders • Supporters • Opposers • Identify the best messengers
  • ANYBODY READY FOR LUNCH YET?
  • Section 4 How do we engage youth?
  • Engaging Youth • Recruit from existing youth groups • Let them choose the topic (see above) • EMPOWER them to make a difference • Prepare them for an adult fight (how do they control the interview)
  • Engaging Youth continued… • Give them the information they need • How do they communicate with each other? • Are they texting, tweeting, emailing? • Using QR codes, facebook, instagram? • Vining, Pinning, Tumbling, YouTubing, etc…? • Once you get a core group, let them recruit
  • Existing Youth Groups • Reach out to your coordinating agency • SADD • STAND • National Honors Society • Student Council • Youth Advisory Councils • Church Youth Groups • The Kent County Youth Summit
  • Working with Youth 101 Everyone has strengths and a role to play
  • Working with Youth 101 • Advisor Tips- Student Leadership Services • How Strong Is Your Youth and Adult Partnership? – Student Leadership Services • Youth Development Model of Prevention – Student Leadership Services • Youth Engagement 101 - Youth Engagement & Action in Hamilton (YEAH)
  • Section 5 Identifying an issue
  • Identifying An Issue • Be clear with the youth if the issue is Wedgwood’s, the coalition’s, or some other group OR • If the youth group will be choosing the issue. Clarifying this up front could avoid problems later.
  • Identifying An Issue • Understand that you are in it for the long haul.
  • Identifying An Issue Do we know what works to address the issue? • The Community Guide http://www.thecommunityguide.org • Alcohol: No Ordinary Commodity. About $40 used on Amazon. • WHO’s Global Strategy to Reduce Harmful Use of Alcohol • The Institute of Medicine’s Reducing Underage Drinking: A Collective Responsibility • The US Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking
  • Identifying An Issue • What data is available to help us identify a problem? • • • • • • • • • Michigan Profile for Healthy Youth – MiPHY – Kent County Specific Youth Risk Behavior Survey – YRBS – National, broken down by state Monitoring The Future – National Data – OK for comparing local vs. nation Underage Drinking Enforcement Training Center – costs of UD by state Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids – costs of youth tobacco use Health Department data Emergency Room/ Ambulance run data Treatment data Law Enforcement data
  • Identifying An Issue • Town Hall Meetings • Surveys • Key informant surveys • Brain storming sessions
  • Identifying An Issue • Do youth care about it? • Is there political will to change this? • Will enforcement be fought in the media? • Is it enforceable / who will enforce it? • Can it lend itself to sound bites? • Can a youth defend this if you are not in the room?
  • Identifying An Issue • Can this be described easily to a person outside your group? • Do we all agree on this issue? • How much of our reputation/future goodwill/political capital are we willing to sacrifice for this issue? • Do we have the support of our administration/ board / funding partner?
  • Identifying An Issue • 1st Step is to understand the difference between an issue and a problem • A problem is a broad area of concern. • An issue is a solution or partial solution to the problem. • Source: Midwest Academy
  • Identifying An Issue • One issue will not solve the problem completely; you will need to target one specific facet of the problem. • So, how do you choose that issue? • Source: Midwest Academy
  • Checklist For Identifying An Issue Source: Midwest Academy A good issue is one that matches most of these criteria. The issue should: 1. Result in Real Improvement in People’s Lives If you can see and feel the improvement, then you can be sure that it has actually been won. 2. Give people a sense of their own power. This builds both the confidence to take on larger issues and loyalty to the organization.
  • 3. Alter the Relations of Power. • Building a strong, ongoing organization creates a new center of power that changes the way the other side makes decisions. 4. Be Worthwhile • Members should feel that they are fighting for something about which they feel good, and which merits the effort. 5. Be Eventually Winnable • The problem must not be so large or the solution so remote that the organization is overwhelmed. People must be able to see from the start that there is a good chance of winning, or that there is a good strategy for winning.
  • 6. Be Widely Felt • Many people must feel that this is a real problem and must agree with the solution. It is not enough that few people feel strongly about it. 7. Be Deeply Felt • People must no only agree, but feel strongly enough to do something about it. 8.Be Easy to Understand • It is preferable that you don’t have to convince people that the problem exists, that your solution is good, and that they want to help to solve it. In general, a good issue should not require a lengthy and difficult explanation.
  • 9. Have Clear Advocacy Targets • The target is generally the person who can give you what you want. A more difficult priority issue usually requires several clear targets. 10. Have a Clear Time Frame that Works for You • A priority issue should have a beginning, middle, and end. 11. Be Non-Divisive • Avoid issues that divide. Don’t pit different constituencies against each other. 12.Build Accountable Leadership
  • 13. Set Your Organization Up for Future Advocacy Work 14. Have a Pocketbook Angle • Issues that get people money or save people money are usually widely and deeply felt. 15. Be consistent with Your Values and Vision • The issues we choose to work on must reflect our values and our vision for an improved society. Source: Midwest Academy
  • Identifying An Issue • Check list of Choosing An Issue work sheet • http://www.geaction.org/chapter2a.pdf
  • Section 6 Creating a game plan
  • Creating an Effective Game Plan Taken from Nonprofit Advocacy: A Michigan Primer. Written by Erin Skene, Director of Michigan Public Policy Initiative (MPPI), 2005 1. What do we want? (Goals) 2. Who can give it to us? (Audience) 3. What do they need to hear? (Message)***
  • Creating a game plan continued… Taken from Nonprofit Advocacy: A Michigan Primer. Written by Erin Skene, Director of Michigan Public Policy Initiative (MPPI), 200 4. Who do they need to hear it from? (Messengers) 5. How can we get them to hear it? (Delivery)*** 6. What have we got? (Resources)
  • Creating a game plan continued… Taken from Nonprofit Advocacy: A Michigan Primer. Written by Erin Skene, Director of Michigan Public Policy Initiative (MPPI), 200 7. What do we need to develop? (Gaps) 8. How do we begin? (First steps) 9. How do we tell if it’s working? (Evaluation)
  • Preparing the Soil • Community presentations to raise awareness • Letters to the editor • Meetings with key community leaders • Articles in newsletters • Email blasts • Posts and tweets
  • Know the Process
  • • Building relationships • Use science and data to make your case • Anecdotal stories
  • Section 7 Using the media to advocate throughout the process
  • “If you don’t exist in the media, for all practical purposes, you don’t exist.” -Daniel Shore National Public Radio
  • “He who controls the media controls what the public believes to be the truth.” - Ken Dail Prevention Network
  • How do we create our message • What data did you use to identify your problem? • How did you decide on what solution to go after? • Who exactly does this problem impact? (Any examples of this impact?) • How will this solution address the problem you identified? • Why should I care?
  • How do we engage the media? • The same way you engage the person you want to ask to the prom.
  • How do we deliver our message to them? • How do we control the message? • What is a PRESS KIT and do we need one in this age of digital media? • How do we get interviewed? • Do I HAVE TO get interviewed?
  • Today’s goals 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Define lobbying and advocating Exploring why we should involve youth Exploring who makes the rules/who to advocate to Outlining how to engage youth Identifying an issue Creating a game plan Using the media throughout the process
  • Mike Tobias, CPS - 517-393-6890 miket@preventionnetwork.org Ken Dail – 517-393-6890 kend@preventionnetwork.org