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6a pitching and friendraising with notes

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  • 1. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising Every PresenTense workshops starts with a pre- exercise. This one is a game that demands a bit more involvement. The Instructor asks everyone to close their eyes, and then walks around the room, picking one person to give a ‘secret password’ to (it can be anything. “Candy?” Your call). Then the Instructor returns to the front of the room and tells people they can open their eyes – and they should start speaking with one another. The goal of the participants is to meet each other, ask them about themselves, find out what they value – and see if they can give them some information or an idea the other person values. If a person who has the password is given an idea or introduction or a piece of feedback they value,Notes Here: they can tell the person who gave them that value the password. After the time is over, the instructor calls “stop” and asks people to sit down, then asks the original person with the password to raise their hand, and then everyone else who got the password to raise their hands. (This workshops is built in such a way that it can take 1.5hrs, or 3hrs, depending on the time allotted. The big different in time comes from the workshops. An instructor should adapt this presentation based on the time for the session before going to teach it. This slide could take in total: 5 or 10 minutes, depending on how long this workshop is to last. Total time of Pitching and Friendraising Workshop: TKTK mins) 1
  • 2. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising The exercise is an example of pitching and friendraising. If the group was successful, most of the room would have their hands up. The point of it is that every body wins. The people who have their hand up have the password because they were able to provide value to someone else. In other words, what we’re talking about today is how to provide value to people quickly, steadily and repeatedly so that everyone will share in the good. (Time =3 mins)Notes Here: 2
  • 3. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising When seeking to raise resources, there are four types of capital to keep in mind. First are introductions – this is social capital. Those introductions can lead you to other resources. Second are insights – this is intellectual capital. These ideas can help your project advance more effectively and efficiently. Third are financial investments – this is financial capital. You use money to buy other things, so this is important but not critical. Last is an investment of time – this is human capital. Time is the most important thing one can seek, because it can be used in the most varied ways, and builds community around an idea. The key for an entrepreneur is to know how to get people interested in giving their capital. (Time = 3Notes Here: mins) 3
  • 4. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising Pitching is a way to get people interested. It is a chance for you to get people to know what you do. (Time = 1 mins)Notes Here: 4
  • 5. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising And there are three core elements to a successful pitch. First, a quick description of what the problem is that you’re trying to solve. That problem needs to be defined in simple terms that enable a person to relate to them. Second, a description of the solution to that problem – which is what the venture is trying to do. Last, a description of what a person can do to help. And this should be an easy way to help and get involved – a simple thing they can do right away. (Time = 3 mins)Notes Here: 5
  • 6. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising Let’s workshop this. Take a minute to jot down some notes, find a partner in the room, and pitch them in three minutes. Try to keep each section less than a minute long – partner, time them. (Instructor, give them 8 minutes for this – then ask someone to pitch the group, and get people’s reactions. Did they understand the problem? Believe in the solution? Do they know what they can do about it?) (Time = 15 mins)Notes Here: 6
  • 7. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising But what if you’re stuck in an elevator, and you have 45 seconds to tell someone what you do and how they can get involved? Let’s try that out. Take a minute to jot down some notes, find a partner in the room, and pitch them in 45 seconds. Try to keep each section less than 15 seconds long – partner, time them. (Instructor, give them 4 minutes for this – then ask someone to pitch the group, and get people’s reactions. Did they understand the problem? Believe in the solution? Do they know what they can do about it?) (Time = 10 mins, but can be 15-20 minutes if the session is longer. In the longer case, go around the room and have each person (but no more than 10 people) pitch the room in 45 seconds)Notes Here: 7
  • 8. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising And what if you’re walking up to someone in a conference and you want them to get to know you? What then? Well you have 15 seconds. Let’s try that out. Take a minute to jot down some notes, find a partner in the room, and pitch them in 15 seconds. Partner, time them. Go back and forth until you get it right. (Instructor, give them 4 minutes for this – then ask someone to pitch the group, and get people’s reactions. Did it get their attention? Do they know what the person wants from them? Do they understand the problem? Believe in the solution? Do they know what they can do about it?) (Time = 10 mins, but can be 15-20 minutes if the session is longer. In the longer case, go around the room and have eachNotes Here: person pitch the room in 15 seconds – and have people go more than once if they want to improve it while others pitch) 8
  • 9. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising Once you’ve got people interested, you need to know how to answer the ‘Now What?’ and for that, we have a few suggestions. This is a five tiered system for getting people involved, each according to the level of interest and depth of history you have with people. We’ll review it quickly here, then go into each of them more in-depth. First, the Board is a traditional vessel that people use to get very involved people to take formal responsibility. Second are Steering Committees – smaller groups with less formal responsibility over the whole organization, but who can lead specific processes. Third is the general mass of volunteers, who are individuals who want to help, don’t exactly know how, but are willing to do a task or two here or there toNotes Here: help out. Fourth are partners from other organizations or causes that are willing to help you while you help them. And last are donors, individuals who love what you’re doing, will not volunteer with tasks, but are willing to give money. Let’s go into each one individually. (Time = 3 mins) 9
  • 10. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising A board is a set of devoted supporters who take personal responsibility for the life of the organization and trust one another to work like a team. Boards should be composed of people who have shown that they are committed to the organization, and want to make it one of their top priorities with their time. These individuals are thereby willing to take on what is known as “fiduciary responsibility”: legal responsibility for the organization, how it runs, and more. It is because of this responsibility and commitment that many boards are composed of donors or investors: they are personally committed to giving the organization the resources it needs to survive. But that doesn’t need to be the case. Board membersNotes Here: can give any of the three W’s to help the organization gain resources: Wealth, Wisdom and Work. To maintain this devotion, however, we recommend keeping the board manageable and small, with 5-7 people at its core. (Time = 3 mins) 10
  • 11. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising Steering Committees are for those individuals who are more willing to commit, but do not have a long history with an organization. These are individuals who are willing to give regular time to the organization, and are willing to start taking on strategic responsibility for particular sub-goals of the organizations. (for example, recruiting volunteers, planning a trip, etc). Steering Committees should be action-case specific, focused on a certain type of activity or responsibility that is reoccurring so they can grow their feeling of ownership and become leaders in the organization and its cause. The more well defined the zone of responsibility is, the more Steering Committee members will be willing to go above and beyond and lead theNotes Here: charge. You can help this by clarifying also the structure of their involvement. Do they meet weekly? For how many hours? What is their specific job description? The more structure you give, the more freedom they’ll feel to give back. (Time = 3 mins) 11
  • 12. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising Volunteers are individuals who are interested in the organization, devoted to the cause, but can’t commit. Generally, people will start as volunteers, then get more involved on a Steering Committee, and possibly join the board. In other words, this is the ticket into the organization. Use it well! Make sure you ask them for an ‘atomic task’: a very specific, achievable task that is time bound and provides a sense of accomplishment. This sense of accomplishment cannot be overplayed: volunteers do not owe you anything. They are helping because they care about the cause, and if they work through you that’s your blessing. The more personal benefit you can provide them from contributing through yourNotes Here: organization, the more likely they will be to remain and continue to help. So get to know them – they are the most valuable assets you’ll raise. (Time = 3 mins) 12
  • 13. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising Not everyone needs to get involved with the organization to help the organization, of course, and recruiting partners can help the organization solve a lot of its challenges without having to do everything on its own. Get to know potential partners through an environmental scan. Complements and Collaborators are the most likely to help. Find out what they need, and build opportunities for mutual benefit. The more you highlight benefits from your partnership to your partner and to the rest of the world, the more people will hear about both of your organizations and get involved. The bigger the pie, the more everyone eats. (Time = 3 mins)Notes Here: 13
  • 14. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising And for those individuals who have more money than time, and would like to give but can’t afford to give their time, you can give financial opportunities. The key to speaking with donors about what you need is to recognize how much they think they can give – and give them the opportunity to help you at that level. Think of this just like giving hours: if someone has only one hour to give a month, make it possible for them to give that hour and see the accomplishment. Tell them how much they helped. And if they can’t give much, but are willing to tell others that they should give to the organization, then you’ve helped your funder become a fundraiser. (Time = 3 mins)Notes Here: 14
  • 15. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising All of this is to say that the lifecycle of any gift always requires patience. The more patience you have, the more long-term payoff you can get. Let people work through you, see the effect of their actions, sense how they had impact – and over time they will give you much more of their time and money than if you started off with a bang. (Time = 2 mins)Notes Here: 15
  • 16. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and FriendraisingNotes Here: 16
  • 17. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising So let’s go into a few online platforms that can help you with this process, because these tools can cut your time and let you work with many more people than otherwise possible. We chose a few tools to help – but there are many more out there that you should explore. First there is Change.org, a site that enables people to start petitions and let others know about their cause. This is a wonderful way to get to people and spark their awareness of their problem. It’s also great to use in a pitch (for example, “27,000 people agree that…”). Getting the word out lets you start to get people involved. (Go online if you can, ask the group for a cause, and start a campaign right away) (Time = 7 mins)Notes Here: 17
  • 18. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising As people get involved they’ll want to identify more with your cause – and Causes is a great platform to help them do so. It connects directly into Facebook, and has been one of the more popular apps in Facebook for a while. Causes enables people to donate their birthday wishes to the cause, get involved in projects, and raise money. (Take a moment and set something up around one of the projects in the group) (Time = 7 mins)Notes Here: 18
  • 19. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising Then, as people get more involved and you want to get them to take on additional financial responsibilities, Network for Good can help build relationships and a giving network. It has a lot of tools for nonprofits and donors alike, and is well worth while to develop and build. (Time = 2S mins, 7L) (Instructor, if you have time and this is a longer presentation, take another 5 minutes and show them the site and how easy it is to set up).Notes Here: 19
  • 20. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising Finally, make sure your venture is listed. Charity Navigator is a great tool to build credibility – and there are a few other such services that provide third party information and ratings to donors. You can only get listed if you are a registered charity, so for some ventures this may not help. For social enterprises there is the B-Corporation, and other tools are developing by the day. The key is to find a way to get validation externally – so you can say, “Don’t take my word for it…” (Instructor, ask them about a Not-for-profit organization they know and search with them for it and its statistics (Time = 5 mins)Notes Here: 20
  • 21. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising All of these online tools, however, will never be a replacement for trust. People invest in people. (Instructor, ask if anyone here gave time or money in the last month, and why. Ask who it was that asked them to give it, and how they asked). The key is to take this understanding into the world: be a good person, and do good for people. The more good you do, the more good there will be. And so we’ll take a five minute break here, and practice how we can be more effective at reaching out and engaging people. (Time = 2 mins)Notes Here: 21
  • 22. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising Now, let’s try this out with a series of workshops, to build out your networking skills. Here are some key values and instructions for a one-on-one conversation (Instructor, ask the participants to read these out, one person per number. Then get two volunteers to come up to the front of the group, and show how they can put this into action. Instruct them to take two minutes to network, with one of the people role playing the entrepreneur, and another person the potential friend or funder. Let them play it out. Give them positive feedback. Ask for feedback from the group with the focus on – did they live up to the first four rules? How can they follow up?Notes Here: Once the two people are done role-playing, as the room to break up into pairs – to find someone in the room they haven’t had as much contact with, and to play it out. Give them 5 minutes to have one person role play the entrepreneur and the other the friend/funder, and then switch). (Time = 10 mins) 22
  • 23. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising Now let’s say you’re at a meeting or a panel discussion and it lets out. What do you do to meet people in the room ? Here are some key values and instructions for a Lightening Networking (Instructor, ask the participants to read these out, one person per number. Then get two volunteers to come up to the front of the group, and show how they can put this into action. Instruct them to take 30 seconds to network, with one of the people role playing the entrepreneur, and another person the potential friend or funder. Let them play it out. Pay attention to body language. Did they seem inviting? Are they smiling? Are they giving enough personal space but notNotes Here: too much? If you feel comfortable with scenarios such as “two on one” or “one on two” play them out [i.e. scenarios when one person interrupts two people already networking, with the entrepreneur as the person in the networking, or when the entrepreneur tries to get into a conversation with two people speaking.] Give them positive feedback. Ask for feedback from the group with the focus on – did they live up to the first four rules? How can they follow up? Once the two people are done role-playing, as the room to break up into pairs – to find someone in the room they haven’t had as much contact with, and to play it out. And once they’re done, try to cut into another group’s conversation. Give them 5 minutes to have one person role play the entrepreneur and the other the friend/funder, and then switch). (Time = 10 mins) 23
  • 24. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising Now let’s say you’re at a conference booth – how do you meet people, have them remember you? Here are some key values and instructions for conference networking. (Instructor, ask the participants to read these out, one person per number. Then get two volunteers to come up to the front of the group, and show how they can put this into action. Instruct them to take 30 seconds to network, with one of the people role playing the entrepreneur standing at a conference booth, and another person the potential friend or funder walking around the room. Let them play it out. Pay attention to body language. Did they seem inviting? Are they smiling? Are they giving enoughNotes Here: personal space but not too much? If you feel comfortable with scenarios such as “two on one” or “one on two” play them out [i.e. scenarios when one person interrupts two people already networking, with the entrepreneur as the person in the networking, or when the entrepreneur tries to get into a conversation with two people speaking.] Give them positive feedback. Ask for feedback from the group with the focus on – did they live up to the first four rules? How can they follow up? Once the two people are done role-playing, as the room to break up in half – half entrepreneurs at booths, half people walking around to check things out . Give them 5 minutes to have one person role play the entrepreneur at a both and the other the friend/funder, and then switch). (Time = 10 mins) 24
  • 25. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising Finally, for every day things, we have casual, relaxed conversation. Don’t forget this is the most important part – and this is how you follow up any quick and light connection up with. (Instructor, ask the participants to read these out, one person per number. Then get two volunteers to come up to the front of the group, sit facing each other as they might in an office or café, and show how they can put this into action. Instruct them to take 3 minutes to talk, with one of the people role playing the entrepreneur following up on a connection at a conference, and another person the potential friend or funder interested but still not sold. Let them play it out. Pay attentionNotes Here: to body language. Did they seem inviting? Are they smiling? Are they giving enough personal space but not too much? Give them positive feedback. Ask for feedback from the group with the focus on – did they live up to the four rules? How can they follow up? Once the two people are done role-playing, as the room to break up into pairs to try it out. Give them 5 minutes to have one person role play the entrepreneur at a both and the other the friend/funder, and then switch). (Time = 10mins) 25
  • 26. Teacher’s Guide for Implementation III: Pitching and Friendraising Great work everyone – remember, practice makes perfect. The whole point of this is to build connections with people, learn about them, and help them do good. Our key takeaway is: Be authentic, gracious, and courageous. Remember, everybody needs somebody--you can help! (Time = 3 mins)Notes Here: 26