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Visual merchandising

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  • 1. VISUALMERCHANDISING
  • 2. VISUAL MEANINGRelating to the sense of sight.MERCHANDISING MEANINGMerchandising is a marketingpractice in which the brand orimage from one product orservice is used to sell another
  • 3. VISUALMERCHANDISING ?
  • 4. Coordination of physical elements in place ofbusiness, so that its project the right image toits customersChange a “passive looker into active buyers”Responsible for total merchandiseOverall business imagePlacements of design elements
  • 5. Contd……..It is the activity and profession of developingthe floor plans and three dimensionaldisplays in order to maximize their salesThe display of products which makes themappealing and attractiveIt utilizes displays, colors, lighting ,smellsand sounds
  • 6. PURPOSE OFVISUAL MERCHANDISING
  • 7. The purpose is to attract ,engage,motivate the customers towardsmaking a purchaseBoth goods and services can bedisplayed to highlight their featuresand benefits
  • 8. PRINCIPLES OFVISUAL MERCHANDISING
  • 9. Make it easier for the customer to locatethe desired category and merchandiseMake it easier to self selectMake it possible to coordinate andaccessorizeEducate about the product in an effectiveand creative wayMake proper arrangements in such a way toincrease the sale of unsought goods
  • 10. IMPORTANCE OFVISUAL MERCHANDISING
  • 11. Purposes are to sell products and promotestore imageShould always try to be different, new, andcreativeChange a “passive looker” into an “activebuyer”Enhances brand imageGenerates impulse salesOverall business image
  • 12. VISUAL MERCHANDISING SUCCESS FACTORS
  • 13. ERRORS TO AVOID INVISUAL MERCHANDISING
  • 14. Too much signageConfusing traffic patternsToo much proppingDisconnection between exteriorwindow and store contentsPoor lightingNo point of viewInconsistency in visual executions
  • 15. OBJECTIVES OF AGOOD STORE DESIGN
  • 16. Design should:be consistent with image and strategypositively influence consumer behaviorconsider costs versus valuebe flexiblerecognize the needs of the disabled –The Americans with Disabilities Act
  • 17. OBJECTIVES OF THESTORE ENVIRONMENT
  • 18.  Get customers into the store (store image)  Serves a critical role in the store selection process  Important criteria include cleanliness, labeled prices, accurate and pleasant checkout clerks, and well-stocked shelves  The store itself makes the most significant and last impression Once they are inside the store, convert them into customers buying merchandise (space productivity)  The more merchandise customers are exposed to that is presented in an orderly manner, the more they tend to buy
  • 19. APPAREL WALL PRESENTATION OF THE MERCHANDISE
  • 20. INCORRECT
  • 21. Fashion apparel wall presentation.In the correct example, formal balance isachieved by creating a mirror image ofgarment on both sides of a center line. Thisdoes not occur in the incorrect example
  • 22. INCORRECT
  • 23. In this, Informal balance is achievedbecause an equal amount of space is filledon either side of a centre line.This does not occur in the incorrectexample.
  • 24. MERCHANDISEPRESENTATION
  • 25. The ways goods arehung, placed onshelves, or otherwisemade available tocustomersShoulder-out Only one side showsFace-forward Hanging garment so full front faces viewer
  • 26. METHODS OF DISPLAY
  • 27. ShelvingHangingfoldingPeggingDumping
  • 28. SHELVING HANGING PEGGINGFOLDING DUMPING
  • 29. DISPLAYED MERCHANDISE  Should be current  Represent styles and lines  Should be well stocked  In demand  New (inform customers of what is available)  Encourage additional purchases  Promote current theme  Look good on display
  • 30. ELEMENTS INVISUAL MERCHANDISING
  • 31. ELEMENTSSTORE STORE MERCHANDISEFRONT INTERIOR DISPLAY STORE STORE LAYOUT SPACE
  • 32. 1. STORE FRONTThe exterior of a business.It includes: 1. Signs 2. Marquee 3. Entrances 4. Window Display
  • 33. SIGNS There are four different types of signs are:1.Promotional Signs2.Location signs3.Institutional signs4.Informational signs
  • 34. PROMOTIONAL SIGNSFor off-price events or specials.
  • 35. LOCATION SIGNSFor direction to specific departments
  • 36. INSTITUTIONAL SIGNSSigns for the store policies
  • 37. INFORMATIONAL SIGNSFor product related benefits/features/ prices etc.
  • 38. MARQUEEThe sign that is used to display the store name
  • 39. ENTRANCESDesigned with customerconvenience and store security inmind.There are several types ofentrances each portraying a certainimage
  • 40. TYPES OF ENTRANCESRevolving – up scale storesPush-Pull – full service stores often with fancyhandlesElectronic – Self-serve stores, with carts suchas Wal-Mart, Meijer, Kroger.Climate Controlled – shopping malls.
  • 41. WINDOW DISPLAYSThe store’s FIRST IMPRESSION with thecustomer.Begin the selling process even before thecustomer enters the store.Suggests the type of merchandise carriedin the store
  • 42. TYPES OF WINDOW DISPLAYS 1. Promotional – promote the sale of one or more items by using special lighting and /or props. Skiwear with fake snow for accents 2. Institutional – promote store image rather than specific items. Designed to build customer good will, show that the business is interested in the community
  • 43. STORE INTERIORAffects the store’s imageIncludes items such as: Floor & wall coverings Lighting Colors Fixtures
  • 44. It is important to create a relaxing,comfortable place for customers to shopCustomers shop longer & are more relaxedand spend more when they are not pressedby crowds, delays & long lines
  • 45. FLOOR AND WALL COVERINGS
  • 46. LIGHTINGS
  • 47. Used to direct customer’s attention to the displayand creates mood.-Use more light for dark colors, less light for lightcolors .-Beam spread; the diameter of the circle of light.
  • 48. BEAM SPREAD TECHNIQUESFlood lightningSpot lightningPinpointing
  • 49. FLOOD LIGHTINGCeiling lights to direct lights over an entirewide display area.
  • 50. SPOT LIGHTING focuses attention on specific areas ortargeted items of merchandise
  • 51. PINPOINTINGfocuses a narrow beam of light on aspecific item
  • 52. COLORSColor selection shouldbe perfect.Help to makemerchandise lookmore interesting.Color schemes help tocreate moods.Capture shoppersattention.
  • 53. Example; in Christmas displays onlycomplementary color scheme i.e. reds and greensare placed next to each other in setting as no otherscheme can accomplish this
  • 54. STORE FIXTURESTo make store’s wall merchandisable, wall usuallycovered with a skin that is fitted with verticalcolumns of notches.
  • 55. TYPES OF FIXTURES  Most common types of fixtures:  Stands Platforms and Elevations Round rack Bin T-Stand Four way faceout
  • 56. STANDSUsed in a varietyor assortmentwindow- fromglass line to theback of the displaywindow
  • 57. PLATFORMS AND ELEVATIONSPlatforms or Elevations can be tables and otherpieces of furniture that can be used to raise up amannequin, a form or arrangement ofmerchandise
  • 58. ROUND RACKSCircular racks on which garments are hungaround the entire circumference
  • 59. BINA rimmed table or bin used to hold sale or specialmerchandise on the sales floor, especially indiscount operations; it has no formal arrangement
  • 60. T-STANDFreestanding, two-way stand in the shape of a T,that holds clothes on hangers, sometimes with onestraight Arm and one waterfall
  • 61. FOUR -WAY STANDA fixture with four extended arms, that permitsaccessibility to hanging merchandise all the wayaround
  • 62. 2. STORE LAYOUT The way the floor space is usedto facilitate and promote sales andbest serve the customer
  • 63. TYPES OF FLOOR SPACE1. Selling Space2. Merchandising Space3. Personnel Space4. Customer Space
  • 64. SELLING SPACEIncludes: Interior displays Sales demonstration areas Sales transaction areas (wrap desk)
  • 65. MERCHANDISE SPACEAllocated to items that are kept ininventory Selling floor Stock room area
  • 66. PERSONNEL SPACESpace for employees: break rooms lockers restrooms
  • 67. CUSTOMER SPACEComfort and convenience of customers: Restaurants Dressing rooms Lounges Restrooms Recreation area for childrenStores are competing more & more in theseareasAllocating more dollars and space for customerconvenience than ever before
  • 68.  Once the floor space has beenallocated, management & visualpersonnel spend a lot of timeplanning the effective use of thespace.
  • 69. VISUAL DECISIONSWhat product are to go whereAgencies – what products should be nextto each otherWhere to put seasonal merchandise suchas coats, swimwear and Christmas itemsTraffic patterns
  • 70. FLOOR LAYOUT
  • 71. STRAIGHT FLOOR LAYOUT ( GRID DESIGN)Best used in retail environments in which majority ofcustomers shop the entire storeCan be confusing and frustrating as it is difficult tosee over the fixtures to other merchandiseForcing customers to back of large store mayfrustrate and cause them to look elsewhereMost familiar examples for supermarkets anddrugstores
  • 72. DIAGONAL FLOOR LAYOUTGood store layout for self-service type retailstoresOffers excellent visibility for cashier andcustomersMovement and traffic flow in the store issmooth
  • 73. ANGULAR FLOOR LAYOUT ( CURVING/LOOP –RACETRACK DESIGN)Best used for high-end storesCurves and angles of fixtures and wallsmakes for more expensive store designSoft angles create better traffic flowthroughout the retail store
  • 74. GEOMETRIC FLOOR LAYOUT (SPINE DESIGN)Is a suitable store design for clothingand apparel shops.Uses racks and fixtures to createinteresting and out- of- the – ordinarytype of store design without a high cost.
  • 75. MIXED FLOOR LAYOUT (FREE FLOW DESIGN)Incorporates the straight, diagonaland angular plansHelps generates the most functionalstore designLayout moves traffic towards wallsand back of the store
  • 76. Storage, Receiving, Marketing Underwear Dressing Rooms Tops Accessories Hats and Handbags Checkout counterStockings Clearance Items Tops PantsCasual Wear Skirts and Dresses Feature FeatureJeans Open Display Window Open Display Window
  • 77. 3. MERCHANDISE DISPLAYSThey are part of the general storeinteriorDisplays generate 1 out of 4 salesThey enable the customer to make aselection without personal assistance
  • 78. KINDS OF DISPLAYS1. Closed Displays2. Open Displays3. Architectural Display4. Point-of-Purchase5. Store Decorations
  • 79. CLOSED DISPLAYSLook but don’t touchRequire sales person assistanceExpensive or fragile merchandiseJewellery cases
  • 80. OPEN DISPLAYHandle merchandise without asalespersonSelf-serviceUsed for most clothing
  • 81. ARCHITECTURAL DISPLAYSActual room settingFurniture
  • 82. POINT-OF-PURCHASEPromote impulse buyingItems at the register Batteries Candy Magazines
  • 83. STORE DECORATIONS Decorations for holidayssuch as Christmas, Halloweenand Valentine’s Day
  • 84. Interior displays use fixtures andprops to showcase merchandiseProps are generally classified asdecorative or functional
  • 85. PROPSObjects added that supportthe theme of the display
  • 86. TYPES OF PROPSFunctional Props - practical items for holdingmerchandise such as mannequins and shirtformsDecorative Props -Only purpose is to enhancemerchandise. Items such as trees, tables, cars.Structural Props -used to support functionaland decorative props and change the physicalmakeup of displays. (boxes, rods, stands,stairways, etc)
  • 87. FUNCTIONAL PROPS
  • 88. DECORATIVE PROPS
  • 89. STRUCTURAL PROPS
  • 90. IMPORTANCE OF INTERIOR DISPLAYSShow the customer what’s newShow customer how to put together a totallookA good display helps create multiple sales Customers want to look like the display Customers want you to show them what to wear
  • 91. INTERIOR DISPLAYSOften convey a common themethrough out the store Animal prints, patriotic theme Used to tell a color story
  • 92. The large display in a store including themannequins & wall displays are usuallyset up by visual departmentSmall table displays and fixture topdisplays are usually set up & maintainedby the individual department staff
  • 93.  It is important to changedepartmental displaysfrequently
  • 94. INTERIOR DISPLAY LOCATIONSShould be chosen tomaximize merchandiseexposure Just inside store entrance At entrances to departments Near cash/wrap counter Next to related items By elevators and escalators Open-to-mall areas
  • 95. WHEN TO CHANGE THE DISPLAYS?
  • 96. When new merchandise comes inJust to change around the pieces of agroup that has been on the floor forawhile Gives the group a new look
  • 97. The same customers walkthrough your departmentevery week – you want it tolook freshYou want to give them areason to buy
  • 98. WHAT TO USE FORSUCCESSFUL DISPLAYS?
  • 99. MannequinsAlternatives to mannequinsFixturesProps
  • 100. TYPES OF MANNEQUINSRealisticSemi realisticAbstractSemi-abstractHeadless
  • 101. REALISTICMANNEQUIN Resembles theeveryday personrather than amovie star.
  • 102. SEMIREALISTICIs like realisticmannequin,But its makeupis moreDecorative andstylized.
  • 103. ABSTRACTIs concerned with creating an overall effect ratherthan reproducing natural lines and proportions.Features such as elbows, fingernails are rarelyindicated.
  • 104. SEMI ABSTRACT Is more stylizedthan the semi-realisticmannequin and itsfeature may bepainted orsuggested ratherthan defined.
  • 105. HEADLESS:Has a full-size orSemi-realistic bodywith Arms and legsbut no Head.It offers nopersonality orimage.
  • 106. ALTERNATIVES TO MANNEQUINS Three quarter forms Articulated artist’s figures Dress forms and suit forms Drapers Hangers Lay down techniques Pin up techniques Flying techniques
  • 107. THREE-QUARTERFORMS:Representation of apart of the Humananatomy, such as theTorso, the bust or thearea from Shoulderto waist or from hipsto ankles.
  • 108. ARTICULATED ARTIST’S FIGURESbased on small wooden miniatures used byartists and designers to get correct proportionsand poses for figure drawing when live model isnot available
  • 109. DRESS FORMS AND SUIT FORMS
  • 110. INFLATABLESAre life-sized“balloons”That stimulateparts of Thehuman anatomy.Most resembles theLower half of thebody And is used toshow jeans andpants.
  • 111. DRAPERWas a simple,uncomplicatedand oftenunderusedalternative tomannequin
  • 112. HANGERS Simple hanger can be analternative to themannequin. Hangers caneither be hung by invisiblewire from a ceiling grid orit can be hung from a lookthat extends from a wallor panel.
  • 113. PINUP TECHNIQUESMakes use of a panel, wall Or some verticalsurface onto which a Garment can bepinned, shaped and Dimensional zed.
  • 114. LAY-DOWN TECHNIQUE Involves the folding, pleating and placement of garment next to garment or accessories next to featured garment.
  • 115. FLYING TECHNIQUESmerchandise is pulled, Stretched or pulled thegarment into abstract Shapes that present anangular and crisp presentation.
  • 116. ATMOSPHERICSThe design of an environment via: visual communications lighting color sound scentTo stimulate customers’ perceptual and emotionalresponses and ultimately influence their purchasebehavior
  • 117. VISUAL COMMUNICATIONSName, logo and retail identityInstitutional signageDirectional, departmental and category signagePoint-of-Sale (POS) SignageLifestyle Graphics
  • 118. CONTD…..Coordinate signs and graphics with store’simageInform the customerUse signs and graphics as propsKeep signs and graphics freshLimit sign copyUse appropriate typefaces on signsCreate theatrical effects
  • 119. SOUND AND SCENTSound Music viewed as valuable marketing tool Often customized to customer demographics - AIE (http://www.aeimusic.com) Can use volume and tempo for crowd controlScent Smell has a large impact on our emotions Victoria Secret, The Magic Kingdom, The Knot Shop Can be administered through time release atomizers or via fragrance-soaked pellets placed on light fixtures
  • 120. CASE STUDY
  • 121. Adidas
  • 122. Adidas• Effectiveness : The display of upside down women signifies the freedom and independency of women which will motivate them to walk in the store.• Why did it work : It forces female customers to ponder what the store holds for them.
  • 123. Marks & Spencer
  • 124. Marks & Spencer• Clarity of thought : The window display clearly shows that the sale season is going on for the apparels and accessories offered by the store.• Creativity : The red color is used to indicate sale period which can be discovered from a far distance. Red colour is psychologically attached to the customers; it portrays excitement/ impulse purchase decisions
  • 125. • Effectiveness : A customer interested would surely walk-in to avail the discounts as the display is shouting out for the sale season.• Why did it work : The entire display used the red color tints and shades indicating sales period & also providing an opportunity to avail extra reduction. The big banners as well as mannequins wearing similar t-shirts talking about sale are also very helpful
  • 126. CONCLUSIONVisual merchandising is first and foremoststrategic activity.Put your best-selling merchandise in your best-selling space.If you only do one thing with your store, makeit professional.The storefront, tell the right story about whatkind of merchandise is availableInvest proper signage to take your store to thenext level.
  • 127. BIBLOGRAPHYwww.textilescommittee.nic.inwww.google.comwww.wikipedia.comwww.visualstore.comwww.slideshare.comFashion: from concept to consumer 1999- frings, ginistephenVisual merchandising and display fifth edition – martin
  • 128. ANYQUESTIONS?
  • 129. SUBMITTED BY:JASPREET kAURL-2010-HSC-09-BFD