1
CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION
Customer satisfaction is the overall essence of the impression about the supplier by the
customer...
2
every supplier should focus on to establish a renounced position in the global market and
enhance business and profit.
I...
3
good customer satisfaction strategy. It doesn't matter whether or not the customer misread the
instructions or made the ...
4
CHAPTER 2-
DESIGN OF
STUDY
OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY
1) To study in detail online banking service provided by State Bank o...
5
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
The research methodology to be adopted for the study is proposed to be as follows :
1) Population o...
6
b) Secondary data:
The secondary data is proposed to be collected from the following sources :
i) Relevant Books and jou...
7
8) Scope of the study :
 The geographical scope of the study is proposed to be State Bank Of India, Chandivli
Branch.
...
8
CHAPTER 3- PROFILE OF SBI BANK
The origin of the State Bank of India goes back to the first decade of the nineteenth cen...
9
bankers had not spread as a general habit in most parts of India. But, for a long time, and
especially up to the time th...
10
government was concerned, was to help the latter raise loans from time to time and also
provide a degree of stability t...
11
the presidency banks from such Reserve Treasuries but the latter could look upon them more
as a favour than as a right....
12
Presidency Banks of Bengal
The presidency Banks of Bengal, Bombay and Madras with their 70 branches were merged in
1921...
13
Stamp of Imperial Bank of India
When India attained freedom, the Imperial Bank had a capital base (including reserves) ...
14
India was destined to act as the pacesetter in this respect and lead the Indian banking system
into the exciting field ...
15
Overview of SBI
The origin of the State Bank of India goes back to the first decade of the nineteenth century
with the ...
16
8-State Bank of Travancore (SBT)
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY SBI
Savings Accounts
Current Accounts
Fixed Deposits...
17
State Bank of India has a variety of schemes under Personal Finance to satisfy varying needs of
the banking public. The...
18
CHAPTER 4
DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
INTRODUCTION
This section in the context of the banking industry will give u...
19
 Strongly agree three points
 Agree two points
 Disagree one point
 Strongly Disagree Zero point
20
TABLE AND DIAGRAMS
I)Classification of Customers according to Gender
Table 1
Number of Respondents according to Gender
...
21
II) Classification of Customers according to Age
Table 2
Number of Respondents according to Age
Age Frequency Percent
Y...
22
Fig No-2
Number of Respondents according to Age
III) Classification of Customers according to Occupation
Table 3
Number...
23
The above information is presented using Pie diagram as given below:-
Fig No-3
Number of Respondents according to Occup...
24
Professional 11 37
Total 30 100
The above table indicates that among 30 customers respondent was SSC qualified, 4 respo...
25
V) Classification of Customers according to type of Bank account
Table 5
Number of Respondents according to Type of Ban...
26
30%
33%
20%
17%
Type of Bank Account
Savings
Current
Fixed
Recurring
27
III) DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS
Testing of Null Hypotheses
The different Null Hypotheses were tested with the help of statist...
28
 Out of 13 customers from Satisfaction group, 9 were male and 4 were female
 Out of 3 customers from Dissatisfaction ...
29
To test the above hypothesis Chi- Square test is applied and the result of the test is
Chi- Square 0.82
Since P value i...
30
Null Hypothesis (Ho):- There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction
towards grievance handling and ...
31
 Out of 10 customer from Low Level Satisfaction group, 6 was male and 4 were
female
The above information is presented...
32
To test the above hypothesis Chi- Square test is applied and the result of the test is
Chi- Square 0.86
Since P value i...
33
Null Hypothesis (Ho):- There is no association between customer’s level of
satisfaction towards CUSTOMER OPINION REGARD...
34
 Out of 5 customers from High Level Satisfaction group, 5 were female
 Out of 11 customers from Low Level Satisfactio...
35
To test the above hypothesis Chi- Square test is applied and the result of the test is
Chi- Square
Since P value is 0.3...
36
Null Hypothesis (Ho):- There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction
towards LOAN APPROVAL procedure...
37
 Out of 1 customer from Low Level Satisfaction group only 1 was female.
The above information is presented using Bar d...
38
To test the above hypothesis Chi- Square test is applied and the result of the test is
Chi- Square
Since P value is 0.3...
39
Null Hypothesis (Ho):- There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction
towards CUSTOMER are SATISFied ...
40
 Out of 10 customers from High Level Satisfaction group, 8 were male and 2 were
female
 Out of 4 customers from Low L...
41
To test the above hypothesis Chi- Square test is applied and the result of the test is
Chi- Square
Since P value is 0.0...
42
Null Hypothesis (Ho):- There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction
regarding INTEREST RATE CHARGED...
43
The above information is presented using Bar diagram as given below
Fig No-1.5
EXPECTED RESPONDENTS
Gender Agree Disagr...
44
To test the above hypothesis Chi- Square test is applied and the result of the test is
Chi- Square
Since P value is 0.4...
45
Null Hypothesis (Ho):- There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction
regarding PROCESSING FEES CHARG...
46
 Out of 8 customers from Low Level Satisfaction group 5 were male and 3 were
female.
The above information is presente...
47
To test the above hypothesis Chi- Square test is applied and the result of the test is
Chi- Square
Since P value is 0.0...
48
Specific Findings- (Quantitative)
Quantitative analysis conducted as per the Research Methodology decided to be used th...
49
respondents”
6. H0 „.There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction
regarding INTEREST RATE CHARGED a...
50
FINDINGS
From the analysis part one can interpret that customers across all groups in the
sample are satisfied with the...
51
Then in this case we will compare all the options & will definitely think that the rate charged by SBI is
high as compa...
52
CHAPTER 5
CONCLUSION
A healthy banking system is essential for any economy striving to achieve good growth and yet
rema...
53
with the room, with the amenities in the room, with the restaurants, and so on. Additionally, in
a holistic sense, the ...
54
ANNEXURE
CUSTOMER SURVEY
General Information
Name (optional):- --------------------------------------------------------...
55
Fixed Recurring
4. CUSTOMER HAS ACHEVED SATISFACTION REGARDING SBI LIABILITY TO
KEEP PROMISES?
1) Strongly agree 2) Agr...
56
1) Strongly agree 2) Agree
3) Disagree 4) strongly disagree
9. INTEREST RATE CHARGED BY SBI are reasonable
1) Strongly ...
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Transcript of "Consumer satisfaction"

  1. 1. 1 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION Customer satisfaction is the overall essence of the impression about the supplier by the customers. This impression which a customer makes regarding supplier is the sum total of all the process he goes through, right from communicating supplier before doing any marketing to post delivery options and services and managing queries or complaints post delivery. During this process the customer comes across working environment of various departments and the type of strategies involved in the organization. This helps the customer to make strong opinion about the supplier which finally results in satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Customer‟s perception on supplier helps the customer choose among the supplier on basis of money value and how well the delivered products suit all the requirements. The supplier‟s services never diminishes after the delivery as customer seeks high values post marketing services which could help them use and customize the delivered product more efficiently. If he is satisfied with the post marketing services then there are good chances for supplier to retain the customers to enhance repeated purchases and make good business profits. It is necessarily required for an organization to interact and communicate with customers on a regular basis to increase customer satisfaction. In these interactions and communications it is required to learn and determine all individual customer needs and respond accordingly. Even if the products are identical in competing markets, satisfaction provides high retention rates. For example, shoppers and retailers are engaged with frequent shopping and credit cards to gain customer satisfaction, many high end retailers also provide membership cards and discount benefits on those cards so that the customer remain loyal to them. Higher the satisfaction level, higher is the sentimental attachment of customers with the specific brand of product and also with the supplier. This helps in making a strong and healthy customer- supplier bonding. This bonding forces the customer to be tied up with that particular supplier and chances of defection very less. Hence customer satisfaction is very important panorama that
  2. 2. 2 every supplier should focus on to establish a renounced position in the global market and enhance business and profit. IMPORTANCE OF CUSTOMER SATISFACTION The importance of customer satisfaction is apparent when you realize that, without customers, you don't have a business. A single unsatisfied customer can send more business away from your company than 10 satisfied customers. The more you focus on customer retention and customer support, the more long-term business you'll get. It's worth it to focus on customer satisfaction strategies, no matter how large or small your company is. Understanding the needs of the customer is critical. A business relationship, just like any other relationship, relies on both people getting their needs met. No matter what type of business you are in, all customers want the same thing. They want to feel welcomed and appreciated by you and your staff. They don't want to get the impression that they are just being used by you for money. Small interactions like "Thank you" and a nice smile can go a long way toward customer satisfaction. Make sure your employees operate with the same principles. A big part of customer satisfaction is reliability. If customers come to expect a certain mode of behavior from you and your employees, you should deliver it to them each and every time. Customers want to be able to rely on you. They expect consistent delivery times (if applicable) and support. By training your employees to treat all customers with the same respect, your customers will all have the same experience with your company, which will increase customer satisfaction. Be honest when you don't meet expectations. Customer satisfaction is at its most important when something goes wrong in the chain of delivery. Whether a customer was double charged or didn't receive what she ordered, your employees need to handle the situation with the utmost care. Your employee should apologize and take steps to rectify the situation. The phrase "the customer is always right" is at the core of a
  3. 3. 3 good customer satisfaction strategy. It doesn't matter whether or not the customer misread the instructions or made the mistake; your employee should take steps to make the customer happy. Customer satisfaction is the foundation of a good business. Satisfied customers will make a great foundation for return business, and they may also bring in their friends and associates. Remember that customers are the heart of any business. Keep them satisfied, and encourage them to tell their friends about their experiences with your business.
  4. 4. 4 CHAPTER 2- DESIGN OF STUDY OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY 1) To study in detail online banking service provided by State Bank of India. 2) To understand customer satisfaction towards service provided by bank. 3) To study the level of technological advancement implemented by bank 4) To test the hypothesis leading the study. 5) To have interpretations, findings and suggestions to enhance the efficacy of customers satisfaction with respect towards the service in particular. HYPOTHESIS Hypothesis 1: Increasing awareness, a well identified market segmentation and developing a constant customer relationship can help gain customer loyalty towards the services of state bank of India Hypothesis 2: Efforts taken by State Bank of India with respect to their services fall short in winning customer satisfaction.
  5. 5. 5 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY The research methodology to be adopted for the study is proposed to be as follows : 1) Population of the study : The population of the study covers the Customers availing the services of State bank of India Chandivli Branch 2) Sampling and Sample size : The study focuses exclusively on Customers of South Indian Bank availing online banking service. Both male and female population has been covered to arrive at proper conclusion. The sample size is proposed to be 30 Customers comprising of 20 male customers and 10 female customers respectively. 3) Data Collection : Both Primary and Secondary data are to be relied upon. a) Primary data: The primary data to be collected from the Customers of State bank Of India, Chandivli Branch as well the customers availing the service from other branches. The method of collecting data is proposed to be : i) Questionnaires ii) Observation iii) Interviews
  6. 6. 6 b) Secondary data: The secondary data is proposed to be collected from the following sources : i) Relevant Books and journals ii) Published and unpublished data iii) Electronic delivered information (information from different Web-sites) Both Primary and Secondary data are proposed to be the base of sources of data for the study. 4) Classification : The data collected will be recorded and classified in the manner which can facilitate proper tabulation. 5) Statistical Methods used for data analysis consist of Quantitative and Qualitative analysis. Chi-square test is used in the study. 6) Tabulation, Analysis and Interpretations On the basis of classification, tables to be prepared . This tables serves as benchmark for interpretation and to arrive at an appropriate conclusion for the study. 7) Reporting System : The study is proposed to be reported in a “Popular Method” of reporting. The statistical part of the report is proposed to be in “Technical Method of Reporting.”.Over all the reporting will be consisting of use of tables, diagrams ( pie charts, bar diagrams ).
  7. 7. 7 8) Scope of the study :  The geographical scope of the study is proposed to be State Bank Of India, Chandivli Branch.  The study has been conducted during the year 2014 and hence all collected information pertains to the current year. Conclusions and suggestions provided in the study is purely based on the existing the services of State Bank Of India. 9) Limitations of the study : 1) State Bank of India has its branches spread over a number of places, however the study covers only Chandivli branch. 2) The project aims to study the level of satisfaction of customers with respect to services, hence satisfaction in respect of other services are not considered. 3) The study is limited to population size of 30 customers. It doesn‟t cover the entire population availing the service of the Bank. 4) There may be some bias in the responses of the respondents which cannot be ruled out fully.
  8. 8. 8 CHAPTER 3- PROFILE OF SBI BANK The origin of the State Bank of India goes back to the first decade of the nineteenth century with the establishment of the Bank of Calcutta in Calcutta on 2 June 1806. Three years later the bank received its charter and was re-designed as the Bank of Bengal (2 January 1809). A unique institution, it was the first joint-stock bank of British India sponsored by the Government of Bengal. The Bank of Bombay (15 April 1840) and the Bank of Madras (1 July 1843) followed the Bank of Bengal. These three banks remained at the apex of modern banking in India till their amalgamation as the Imperial Bank of India on 27 January 1921. Primarily Anglo-Indian creations, the three presidency banks came into existence either as a result of the compulsions of imperial finance or by the felt needs of local European commerce and were not imposed from outside in an arbitrary manner to modernise India’s economy. Their evolution was, however, shaped by ideas culled from similar developments in Europe and England, and was influenced by changes occurring in the structure of both the local trading environment and those in the relations of the Indian economy to the economy of Europe and the global economic framework. Establishment The establishment of the Bank of Bengal marked the advent of limited liability, joint-stock banking in India. So was the associated innovation in banking, viz. the decision to allow the Bank of Bengal to issue notes, which would be accepted for payment of public revenues within a restricted geographical area. This right of note issue was very valuable not only for the Bank of Bengal but also its two siblings, the Banks of Bombay and Madras. It meant an accretion to the capital of the banks, a capital on which the proprietors did not have to pay any interest. The concept of deposit banking was also an innovation because the practice of accepting money for safekeeping (and in some cases, even investment on behalf of the clients) by the indigenous
  9. 9. 9 bankers had not spread as a general habit in most parts of India. But, for a long time, and especially up to the time that the three presidency banks had a right of note issue, bank notes and government balances made up the bulk of the investible resources of the banks. The three banks were governed by royal charters, which were revised from time to time. Each charter provided for a share capital, four-fifth of which were privately subscribed and the rest owned by the provincial government. The members of the board of directors, which managed the affairs of each bank, were mostly proprietary directors representing the large European managing agency houses in India. The rest were government nominees, invariably civil servants, one of whom was elected as the president of the board. Business The business of the banks was initially confined to discounting of bills of exchange or other negotiable private securities, keeping cash accounts and receiving deposits and issuing and circulating cash notes. Loans were restricted to Rs.one lakh and the period of accommodation confined to three months only. The security for such loans was public securities, commonly called Company’s Paper, bullion, treasure, plate, jewels, or goods ‘not of a perishable nature’ and no interest could be charged beyond a rate of twelve per cent. Loans against goods like opium, indigo, salt woollens, cotton, cotton piece goods, mule twist and silk goods were also granted but such finance by way of cash credits gained momentum only from the third decade of the nineteenth century. All commodities, including tea, sugar and jute, which began to be financed later, were either pledged or hypothecated to the bank. Demand promissory notes were signed by the borrower in favour of the guarantor, which was in turn endorsed to the bank. Lending against shares of the banks or on the mortgage of houses, land or other real property was, however, forbidden. Indians were the principal borrowers against deposit of Company’s paper, while the business of discounts on private as well as salary bills was almost the exclusive monopoly of individuals Europeans and their partnership firms. But the main function of the three banks, as far as the
  10. 10. 10 government was concerned, was to help the latter raise loans from time to time and also provide a degree of stability to the prices of government securities. Major change in the conditions A major change in the conditions of operation of the Banks of Bengal, Bombay and Madras occurred after 1860. With the passing of the Paper Currency Act of 1861, the right of note issue of the presidency banks was abolished and the Government of India assumed from 1 March 1862 the sole power of issuing paper currency within British India. The task of management and circulation of the new currency notes was conferred on the presidency banks and the Government undertook to transfer the Treasury balances to the banks at places where the banks would open branches. None of the three banks had till then any branches (except the sole attempt and that too a short-lived one by the Bank of Bengal at Mirzapore in 1839) although the charters had given them such authority. But as soon as the three presidency bands were assured of the free use of government Treasury balances at places where they would open branches, they embarked on branch expansion at a rapid pace. By 1876, the branches, agencies and sub agencies of the three presidency banks covered most of the major parts and many of the inland trade centres in India. While the Bank of Bengal had eighteen branches including its head office, seasonal branches and sub agencies, the Banks of Bombay and Madras had fifteen each. Presidency Banks Act The presidency Banks Act, which came into operation on 1 May 1876, brought the three presidency banks under a common statute with similar restrictions on business. The proprietary connection of the Government was, however, terminated, though the banks continued to hold charge of the public debt offices in the three presidency towns, and the custody of a part of the government balances. The Act also stipulated the creation of Reserve Treasuries at Calcutta, Bombay and Madras into which sums above the specified minimum balances promised to the presidency banks at only their head offices were to be lodged. The Government could lend to
  11. 11. 11 the presidency banks from such Reserve Treasuries but the latter could look upon them more as a favour than as a right. The decision of the Government to keep the surplus balances in Reserve Treasuries outside the normal control of the presidency banks and the connected decision not to guarantee minimum government balances at new places where branches were to be opened effectively checked the growth of new branches after 1876. The pace of expansion witnessed in the previous decade fell sharply although, in the case of the Bank of Madras, it continued on a modest scale as the profits of that bank were mainly derived from trade dispersed among a number of port towns and inland centers of the presidency. India witnessed rapid commercialization in the last quarter of the nineteenth century as its railway network expanded to cover all the major regions of the country. New irrigation networks in Madras, Punjab and Sind accelerated the process of conversion of subsistence crops into cash crops, a portion of which found its way into the foreign markets. Tea and coffee plantations transformed large areas of the eastern Terais, the hills of Assam and the Nilgiris into regions of estate agriculture par excellence. All these resulted in the expansion of India’s international trade more than six-fold. The three presidency banks were both beneficiaries and promoters of this commercialization process as they became involved in the financing of practically every trading, manufacturing and mining activity in the sub-continent. While the Banks of Bengal and Bombay were engaged in the financing of large modern manufacturing industries, the Bank of Madras went into the financing of large modern manufacturing industries, the Bank of Madras went into the financing of small-scale industries in a way which had no parallel elsewhere. But the three banks were rigorously excluded from any business involving foreign exchange. Not only was such business considered risky for these banks, which held government deposits, it was also feared that these banks enjoying government patronage would offer unfair competition to the exchange banks which had by then arrived in India. This exclusion continued till the creation of the Reserve Bank of India in 1935.
  12. 12. 12 Presidency Banks of Bengal The presidency Banks of Bengal, Bombay and Madras with their 70 branches were merged in 1921 to form the Imperial Bank of India. The triad had been transformed into a monolith and a giant among Indian commercial banks had emerged. The new bank took on the triple role of a commercial bank, a banker’s bank and a banker to the government. The establishment of the Reserve Bank of India as the central bank of the country in 1935 ended the quasi-central banking role of the Imperial Bank. The latter ceased to be bankers to the Government of India and instead became agent of the Reserve Bank for the transaction of government business at centres at which the central bank was not established. But it continued to maintain currency chests and small coin depots and operate the remittance facilities scheme for other banks and the public on terms stipulated by the Reserve Bank. It also acted as a bankers’ bank by holding their surplus cash and granting them advances against authorized securities. The management of the bank clearing houses also continued with it at many places where the Reserve Bank did not have offices. The bank was also the biggest tenderer at the Treasury bill auctions conducted by the Reserve Bank on behalf of the Government. Imperial Bank The Imperial Bank during the three and a half decades of its existence recorded an impressive growth in terms of offices, reserves, deposits, investments and advances, the increases in some cases amounting to more than six-fold. The financial status and security inherited from its forerunners no doubt provided a firm and durable platform. But the lofty traditions of banking which the Imperial Bank consistently maintained and the high standard of integrity it observed in its operations inspired confidence in its depositors that no other bank in India could perhaps then equal. All these enabled the Imperial Bank to acquire a pre-eminent position in the Indian banking industry and also secure a vital place in the country’s economic life.
  13. 13. 13 Stamp of Imperial Bank of India When India attained freedom, the Imperial Bank had a capital base (including reserves) of Rs.11.85 crores, deposits and advances of Rs.275.14 crores and Rs.72.94 crores respectively and a network of 172 branches and more than 200 sub offices extending all over the country. First Five Year Plan In 1951, when the First Five Year Plan was launched, the development of rural India was given the highest priority. The commercial banks of the country including the Imperial Bank of India had till then confined their operations to the urban sector and were not equipped to respond to the emergent needs of economic regeneration of the rural areas. In order, therefore, to serve the economy in general and the rural sector in particular, the All India Rural Credit Survey Committee recommended the creation of a state-partnered and state-sponsored bank by taking over the Imperial Bank of India, and integrating with it, the former state-owned or state- associate banks. An act was accordingly passed in Parliament in May 1955 and the State Bank of India was constituted on 1 July 1955. More than a quarter of the resources of the Indian banking system thus passed under the direct control of the State. Later, the State Bank of India (Subsidiary Banks) Act was passed in 1959, enabling the State Bank of India to take over eight former State-associated banks as its subsidiaries (later named Associates).The State Bank of
  14. 14. 14 India was destined to act as the pacesetter in this respect and lead the Indian banking system into the exciting field of national development.
  15. 15. 15 Overview of SBI The origin of the State Bank of India goes back to the first decade of the nineteenth century with the establishment of the Bank of Calcutta in Calcutta on 2 June 1806. Three years later the bank received its charter and was re-designed as the Bank of Bengal (2 January 1809). A unique institution, it was the first joint-stock bank of British India sponsored by the Government of Bengal. The Bank of Bombay (15 April 1840) and the Bank of Madras (1 July 1843) followed the Bank of Bengal. These three banks remained at the apex of modern banking in India till their amalgamation as the Imperial Bank of India on 27 January 1921. Primarily Anglo-Indian creations, the three presidency banks came into existence either as a result of the compulsions of imperial finance or by the felt needs of local European commerce and were not imposed from outside in an arbitrary manner to modernise India's economy. Their evolution was, however, shaped by ideas culled from similar developments in Europe and England, and was influenced by changes occurring in the structure of both the local trading environment and those in the relations of the Indian economy to the economy of Europe and the global economic framework. The eight banking subsidiaries are: 1-State Bank of Bikaner and Jaipur (SBBJ) 2-State Bank of Hyderabad (SBH) 3-State Bank of India (SBI) 4-State Bank of Indore (SBIR) 5-State Bank of Mysore (SBM) 6-State Bank of Patiala (SBP) 7-State Bank of Saurashtra (SBS)
  16. 16. 16 8-State Bank of Travancore (SBT) PRODUCTS AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY SBI Savings Accounts Current Accounts Fixed Deposits LOANS Personal Loans Home Loans Two Wheeler Loans New Car Loans Used Car Loans Overdraft Against Car Express Loans Gold Loan Educational Loan Loan Against Securities Loan Against Property Loans Against Rental Receivables Cards Credit Cards Debit Cards
  17. 17. 17 State Bank of India has a variety of schemes under Personal Finance to satisfy varying needs of the banking public. The Bank offers the following schemes with attractive rates of interest: * Housing Loan * Property Loan * Car Loan * Educational Loan * Personal Loan * Loan to Pensioners * Credit Khazana * Loan Against Shares/Debentures * Loan For ESOPS * Festival Loans * Tribal-Plus Scheme * EMI Calculator * CENTRAL SCHEME FOR INTEREST SUBSIDY ON EDUCATION LOANS Many of our branches offer loans under Personal Finance. This section also offers an EMI calculator to facilitate computation of monthly repayment.
  18. 18. 18 CHAPTER 4 DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION INTRODUCTION This section in the context of the banking industry will give us an insight into the parameters of customer satisfaction and their measurement. The data has been collected mainly with the help of questionnaires. The data was collected with the help of 15 questions covering population of 30 customers. Exclusive questions were prepared on online banking to understand the level of customer satisfaction. The questions were classified into two groups : a) General b) Specific General information was collected under following heads: 1. Gender 2. Age 3. Occupation 4. Qualification 5. Bank Account Specific information was collected on aspects relating to online banking in specific. EVALUATION METHOD For evaluating the responses of customers, groups were awarded with scores three, two, one and zero.
  19. 19. 19  Strongly agree three points  Agree two points  Disagree one point  Strongly Disagree Zero point
  20. 20. 20 TABLE AND DIAGRAMS I)Classification of Customers according to Gender Table 1 Number of Respondents according to Gender Gender Frequency Percent Male 20 66 Female 10 34 Total 30 100 The above table indicates that among 30 respondents 20 were male and 10 were female customers. The above information is presented using Pie diagram as given below:- Fig No-1 Number of Respondents according to Gender
  21. 21. 21 II) Classification of Customers according to Age Table 2 Number of Respondents according to Age Age Frequency Percent Young 10 33 Middle aged 11 37 Elderly 4 13 Senior Citizen 5 17 Total 30 100 The above table indicates that among 30 customers 10 were young, 11 were middle aged,4 were elderly,5 were senior citizen. The above information is presented using Pie diagram as given below:- 67% 33% Gender Male Female
  22. 22. 22 Fig No-2 Number of Respondents according to Age III) Classification of Customers according to Occupation Table 3 Number of Respondents according to Occupation Occupation Frequency Percent Service 10 33 Business 12 40 Professional 8 27 Total 30 100 The above table indicates that among 30 customers 10 were in the field of service, 12 were businessmen, 8 were professionally qualified individuals. Young 33% Middle aged 37% Elderly 13% Senior citizen 17% Age
  23. 23. 23 The above information is presented using Pie diagram as given below:- Fig No-3 Number of Respondents according to Occupation IV) Classification of Customers according to Qualification Table 4 Number of Respondents according to Qualification Qualification Frequency Percent Below SSC 0 0 SSC 1 3 HSC 4 13 Graduate 9 30 Post Graduate 5 17 Service 33% Business 40% Professional 27% Occupation
  24. 24. 24 Professional 11 37 Total 30 100 The above table indicates that among 30 customers respondent was SSC qualified, 4 respondents were HSC qualified, 9 were graduate,5 were post graduate and 11 were professionally qualified individuals. None are below SSC. The above information is presented using Pie diagram as given below:- Fig No-4 Number of Respondents according to Qualification 0% 3% 13% 30% 17% 37% Qualification Below SSC SSC HSC Graduate Post Graduate
  25. 25. 25 V) Classification of Customers according to type of Bank account Table 5 Number of Respondents according to Type of Bank Account Type of Bank Account Frequency Percent Savings 9 30 Current 10 33 Fixed 6 20 Recurring 5 17 Total 30 100 The above table indicates that among 30 customers 9 were saving account holders,10 were current account holders,6 were fixed account holders and 5 were recurring account holders. The above information is presented using Pie diagram as given below:- Fig No-5 Number of Respondents according to type of Bank account
  26. 26. 26 30% 33% 20% 17% Type of Bank Account Savings Current Fixed Recurring
  27. 27. 27 III) DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS Testing of Null Hypotheses The different Null Hypotheses were tested with the help of statistical tool. For this purpose Chi- Square test is conducted Null Hypothesis (Ho):- There is no association between customer’s overall level of satisfaction towards services of banks and gender of the respondents. Alternative Hypothesis:- There is association between customer’s overall level of satisfaction towards services of banks and gender of the respondents To test the null hypothesis, collected information was classified and presented in the table format given below: Table No 1 I) CUSTOMER HAS ACHEVED SATISFACTION REGARDING SBI LIABILITY TO KEEP PROMISES? ACTUAL RESPONSE Gender Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Total Male 9 2 5 4 20 Female 4 1 4 1 10 Total 13 3 9 5 30 FINDINGS
  28. 28. 28  Out of 13 customers from Satisfaction group, 9 were male and 4 were female  Out of 3 customers from Dissatisfaction group, 2 were male and 1 was female  Out of 9 customers from High Level Satisfaction group, 5 were male and 4 were female  Out of 5 customers from Low Level Satisfaction group, 4 were male and 1 was female The above information is presented using Bar diagram as given below EXPECTED RESPONDENTS Gender Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Male 8.6 2 6 3.3 Female 4.3 1 3 1.6 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Disagree Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly 9 2 5 44 1 4 1 Male Female
  29. 29. 29 To test the above hypothesis Chi- Square test is applied and the result of the test is Chi- Square 0.82 Since P value is 0.82 which is greater than standard P value 0.05 therefore chi square is accepted and Null hypothesis is accepted. CONCLUSION: There is no association between customer’s overall level of satisfaction towards LIABILITY TO KEEP PROMISES AND gender of the respondents. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Disagree Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly 8.6 2 6 3.3 4.3 1 3 1.6 Male Female
  30. 30. 30 Null Hypothesis (Ho):- There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction towards grievance handling and gender of the respondents Alternative Hypothesis:- There is association between customer’s level of satisfaction towards grievance handling and gender of the respondents To test the null hypothesis, collected information was classified and presented in the table format given below Table No 1.1 Complaits and grievences are resolved within resoanable time to the satisfaction of customers? ACTUAL RESPONSE Gender Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Total Male 5 4 5 6 20 Female 3 1 2 4 10 Total 8 5 7 10 30 FINDINGS  Out of 8 customers from Satisfaction group, 5 were male and 3 were female  Out of 5 customers from Dissatisfaction group, 4 were male and 1 was female  Out of 7 customers from High Level Satisfaction group, 5 were male and 2 were female
  31. 31. 31  Out of 10 customer from Low Level Satisfaction group, 6 was male and 4 were female The above information is presented using Bar diagram as given below Fig No-1.1 Grievance Handling EXPECTED RESPONDENTS Gender Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Male 5.3 3.3 4.6 6.6 Female 2.6 1.6 2.3 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Disagree Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly 5 4 5 6 3 1 2 4
  32. 32. 32 To test the above hypothesis Chi- Square test is applied and the result of the test is Chi- Square 0.86 Since P value is 0.86 which is greater than standard P value 0.05 therefore chi square is accepted and Null hypothesis is accepted. CONCLUSION: There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction towards grievance handling and gender of the respondents. 5.3 3.3 4.6 6.6 2.6 1.6 2.3 3.3 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Disagree Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Male Female
  33. 33. 33 Null Hypothesis (Ho):- There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction towards CUSTOMER OPINION REGARDING SBI AS A TRUST WORTHY BANK and gender of the respondents Alternative Hypothesis:- There is association between customer’s level of satisfaction towards CUSTOMER OPINION REGARDING SBI AS A TRUST WORTHY BANK and gender of the respondents To test the null hypothesis, collected information was classified and presented in the table format given below Table No 1.2 CUSTOMER OPINION REGARDING SBI AS A TRUST WORTHY BANK ACTUAL RESPONSE Gender Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Total Male 7 2 5 6 20 Female 4 1 0 5 10 Total 11 3 5 11 30 FINDINGS  Out of 11 customers from Satisfaction group, 7 were male and 4 were female  Out of 3 customers from Dissatisfaction group, 2 were male and 1 was female
  34. 34. 34  Out of 5 customers from High Level Satisfaction group, 5 were female  Out of 11 customers from Low Level Satisfaction group 6 were male and 5 were female The above information is presented using Bar diagram as given below Fig No-1.2 EXPECTED RESPONDENTS Gender Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Male 7.3 2 3.3 7.3 Female 3.6 1 1.6 3.6 Disagree Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly 7 2 5 6 4 1 0 5 Chart Title Male Female
  35. 35. 35 To test the above hypothesis Chi- Square test is applied and the result of the test is Chi- Square Since P value is 0.35 which is greater than standard P value 0.05 therefore chi square is accepted and Null hypothesis is accepted. CONCLUSION: There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction towards A TRUST WORTHY BANK and gender of the respondents Male Female0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Disagree Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly 7.3 2 3.3 7.3 3.6 1 1.6 3.6 Male Female
  36. 36. 36 Null Hypothesis (Ho):- There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction towards LOAN APPROVAL procedure is satisfactory to the customer needs and gender of the respondents Alternative Hypothesis:- There is association between customer’s level of satisfaction towards LOAN APPROVAL procedure is satisfactory to the customer needs and gender of the respondents To test the null hypothesis, collected information was classified and presented in the table format given below Table 1.3 LOAN APPROVAL procedure is satisfactory to the customer needs ACTUAL RESPONSE Gender Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Total Male 10 5 5 0 20 Female 6 1 2 1 10 Total 16 6 7 1 30 FINDINGS  Out of 16 customers from Satisfaction group, 10 were male and 6 were female  Out of 6 customers from Dissatisfaction group, 5 were male and 1 was female  Out of 7 customers from High Level Satisfaction group, 5 were male and 2 were female
  37. 37. 37  Out of 1 customer from Low Level Satisfaction group only 1 was female. The above information is presented using Bar diagram as given below Fig No-1.3 EXPECTED RESPONDENTS Gender Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Male 10.6 4 4.6 0.6 Female 5.3 2 2.3 0.3 0 2 4 6 8 10 Disagree 10 5 5 0 6 1 2 1 Male Female
  38. 38. 38 To test the above hypothesis Chi- Square test is applied and the result of the test is Chi- Square Since P value is 0.39 which is greater than standard P value 0.05 therefore chi square is accepted and Null hypothesis is accepted. CONCLUSION: There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction towards LOAN APPROVAL procedure and gender of the respondents 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Disagree Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly 10.6 4 4.6 0.6 5.3 2 2.3 0.3 Male Female
  39. 39. 39 Null Hypothesis (Ho):- There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction towards CUSTOMER are SATISFied REGARDING EMI SCHEMES OFFERED BY SBI and gender of the respondents Alternative Hypothesis:- There is association between customer’s level of satisfaction towards CUSTOMER are Satisfied REGARDING EMI SCHEMES OFFERED BY SBI and gender of the respondents To test the null hypothesis, collected information was classified and presented in the table format given below Table 1.4 CUSTOMERS are SATISFied REGARDING EMI SCHEMES OFFERED BY SBI ACTUAL RESPONSE Gender Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Total Male 4 6 8 2 20 Female 6 0 2 2 10 Total 10 6 10 4 30 FINDINGS  Out of 10 customers from Satisfaction group, 4 were male and 6 were female  Out of 6 customers from Dissatisfaction group, 6 were male
  40. 40. 40  Out of 10 customers from High Level Satisfaction group, 8 were male and 2 were female  Out of 4 customers from Low Level Satisfaction group 2 were male and only 2 were female The above information is presented using Bar diagram as given below Fig No-1.4 EXPECTED RESPONDENTS Gender Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Male 6.6 4 6.6 2.6 Female 3.3 2 3.3 1.3 Male 0 5 10 Disagree Agree Disagree Strongly AgreeStrongly 4 6 8 2 6 0 2 2 Male Female
  41. 41. 41 To test the above hypothesis Chi- Square test is applied and the result of the test is Chi- Square Since P value is 0.06 which is greater than standard P value 0.05 therefore chi square is accepted and Null hypothesis is accepted. CONCLUSION: There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction REGARDING EMI SCHEMES OFFERED BY SBI and gender of the respondents 6.6 4 6.6 2.6 3.3 2 3.3 1.3 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Disagree Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Male Female
  42. 42. 42 Null Hypothesis (Ho):- There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction regarding INTEREST RATE CHARGED BY SBI are reasonable and gender of the respondents Alternative Hypothesis:- There is association between customer’s level of satisfaction regarding INTEREST RATE CHARGED BY SBI are reasonable and gender of the respondents To test the null hypothesis, collected information was classified and presented in the table format given below Table 1.5 INTEREST RATE CHARGED BY SBI are reasonable ACTUAL RESPONSE Gender Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Total Male 9 2 5 4 20 Female 7 1 2 0 10 Total 16 3 7 4 30 FINDINGS  Out of 16 customers from Satisfaction group, 9 were male and 7 were female  Out of 3 customers from Dissatisfaction group, 2 were male and 1 was female  Out of 7 customers from High Level Satisfaction group,5 were male and 2 were female  Out of 4 customers from Low Level Satisfaction group 4 were female.
  43. 43. 43 The above information is presented using Bar diagram as given below Fig No-1.5 EXPECTED RESPONDENTS Gender Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Male 9 2 5 4 Female 7 1 2 0 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Disagree Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly 9 2 5 4 7 1 2 0 Female Male
  44. 44. 44 To test the above hypothesis Chi- Square test is applied and the result of the test is Chi- Square Since P value is 0.41 which is greater than standard P value 0.05 therefore chi square is accepted and Null hypothesis is accepted. CONCLUSION: There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction regarding INTEREST RATE CHARGED and gender of the respondents 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Disagree Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly 10.6 2 4.6 2.6 5.3 1 2.3 1.3 Female Male
  45. 45. 45 Null Hypothesis (Ho):- There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction regarding PROCESSING FEES CHARGED BY SBI is satisfactory and gender of the respondents Alternative Hypothesis:- There is association between customer’s level of satisfaction regarding PROCESSING FEES CHARGED BY SBI is satisfactory and gender of the respondents To test the null hypothesis, collected information was classified and presented in the table format given below Table 1.6 PROCESSING FEES CHARGED BY SBI is satisfactory ACTUAL RESPONSE Gender Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Total Male 12 3 0 5 20 Female 1 4 2 3 10 Total 13 7 2 8 30 FINDINGS  Out of 13 customers from Satisfaction group, 12 were male and 1 was female  Out of 7 customers from Dissatisfaction group, 3 were male and 4 were female  Out of 2 customers from High Level Satisfaction group, 2 were female
  46. 46. 46  Out of 8 customers from Low Level Satisfaction group 5 were male and 3 were female. The above information is presented using Bar diagram as given below Fig No-1.6 EXPECTED RESPONDENTS Gender Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Male 8.6 4.6 1.3 5.3 Female 4.3 2.3 0.6 2.6 12 3 0 5 1 4 2 3 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Disagree Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly Male Female
  47. 47. 47 To test the above hypothesis Chi- Square test is applied and the result of the test is Chi- Square Since P value is 0.02 which is less than standard P value 0.05 therefore chi square is rejected and alternative hypothesis is accepted. CONCLUSION: There is association between customer’s level of satisfaction regarding PROCESSING FEES CHARGED and gender of the respondents 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Disagree Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Strongly 8.6 4.6 1.3 5.3 4.3 2.3 0.6 2.6 Male Female
  48. 48. 48 Specific Findings- (Quantitative) Quantitative analysis conducted as per the Research Methodology decided to be used through statistical methods. In this study, the null-hypotheses were subjected to the chi-square test. In the given process the results of the test could be achieved and the same is reported in the following table which briefly indicates the results. Table no: 2 Summary of test of Null-Hypotheses with respect to online banking services Null Hypotheses With Reference to various aspects of online banking service provided by South Indian Bank Chi Square 1. H0 „There is no association between customer’s overall level of satisfaction towards LIABILITY TO KEEP PROMISES AND gender of the respondents.” Accepted 2. H0 „There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction towards grievance handling and gender of the respondents” Accepted 3. H0 „There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction towards A TRUST WORTHY BANK and gender of the respondent” Accepted 4. H0 „There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction towards LOAN APPROVAL procedure and gender of the respondents” Accepted 5. H0 „There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction REGARDING EMI SCHEMES OFFERED BY SBI and gender of the Accepted
  49. 49. 49 respondents” 6. H0 „.There is no association between customer’s level of satisfaction regarding INTEREST RATE CHARGED and gender of the respondents” Accepted 7. H0 „There is association between customer’s level of satisfaction regarding PROCESSING FEES CHARGED and gender of the respondents” Rejected
  50. 50. 50 FINDINGS From the analysis part one can interpret that customers across all groups in the sample are satisfied with the service offered by SBI except for the interest rate & processing charges. We have already seen that a very high percentage of customers across all groups in the sample are unsatisfied with the rate of interest & the processing fees being charged by SBI. As I interviewed all the customers in the sample, one thing I found is that the main reason behind such unsatisfaction by a majority of the customers is the high rate of interest being charged by SBI. It all depends on customer attitude & perception. People have a tendency of comparing each option with the other option available to them & then they evaluate. In case of SBI, the same thing has happened. Here also the customers have perception that the rate charged by SBI is comparatively higher than the rate charged by other institutions offering personal loans.
  51. 51. 51 Then in this case we will compare all the options & will definitely think that the rate charged by SBI is high as compared to others. This is what has exactly happened with SBI. Same is the case with the processing fees also as customers think that the fees charged by SBI is very high. Except for the interest rate & the processing charges, customers are satisfied with all other aspects of the service being provided by SBI. Only this thing is affecting the customer satisfaction regarding overall service offered by SBI. There are many customers who are though satisfied with the overall service of SBI but they are not satisfied with the interest rate & processing fees being charged by SBI. This signals a danger for SBI as its customers are not satisfied with the interest rate & processing charges. As many customers look out for only these two aspects, any other institution offering personal loan at a low rate may come & takeaway the customers of SBI. This is now started happening with SBI as its customers are now turning towards its competitors, who are offering personal loans at a comparatively lower rate.
  52. 52. 52 CHAPTER 5 CONCLUSION A healthy banking system is essential for any economy striving to achieve good growth and yet remain stable in an increasingly global business environment. The Indian banking system has witnessed a series of reforms in the past, like deregulation of interest rates, dilution of government stake in PSBs, and increased participation of private sector banks. It has also undergone rapid changes, reflecting a number of underlying developments. This trend has created new competitive threats as well as new opportunities. This paper aims to foresee major future banking trends, based on these past and current movements in the market. Given the competitive market, banking will (and to a great extent already has) become a process of choice and convenience. The future of banking would be in terms of integration. This is already becoming a reality with new-age banks such as YES Bank, and others too adopting a single-PIN. Geography will no longer be an inhibitor. Technology will prove to be the differentiator in the short-term but the dynamic environment will soon lead to its saturation and what will ultimately be the key to success will be a better relationship management. In short, I would like to say that the very act of the concerned management at sbi in giving me the job of critically examining consumer satisfaction towards financial products and services of the company is a step in their continual mission of making all round improvements as a means of progress. The bank has a very bright future to look forward to and will be a trailblazer in its own. Customer satisfaction is measured at the individual level, but it is almost always reported at an aggregate level. It can be, and often is, measured along various dimensions. A hotel, for example, might ask customers to rate their experience with its front desk and check-in service,
  53. 53. 53 with the room, with the amenities in the room, with the restaurants, and so on. Additionally, in a holistic sense, the hotel might ask about overall satisfaction with your stay. As research on consumption experiences grows, evidence suggests that consumers purchase goods and services for a combination of two types of benefits: hedonic and utilitarian. Hedonic benefits are associated with the sensory and experiential attributes of the product. Utilitarian benefits of a product are associated with the more instrumental and functional attributes of the product. Customer satisfaction is an ambiguous and abstract concept and the actual manifestation of the state of satisfaction will vary from person to person and product/service to product/service. The state of satisfaction depends on a number of both psychological and physical variables which correlate with satisfaction behaviors such as return and recommend rate. The level of satisfaction can also vary depending on other options the customer may have and other products against which the customer can compare the organization's products. Conclusion for Hypothesis: Hypothesis 1: Increasing awareness, a well identified market segmentation and developing a constant customer relationship can help gain customer loyalty towards services of State Bank of India .This statement is accepted and proved on the basis of my findings and survey. Hence Hypothesis 1 is accepted and Hypothesis 2 is rejected.
  54. 54. 54 ANNEXURE CUSTOMER SURVEY General Information Name (optional):- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Gender : - MaleFemale Age : - 18 to 21 years 22 to 45 years 45 to 60 years above 60 Years Occupation : - Service Professional Business Other Qualification : - Less than S.S.C S.S.C H.S.C Graduate Post Graduate Professional Type of Bank Account:- Savings Current
  55. 55. 55 Fixed Recurring 4. CUSTOMER HAS ACHEVED SATISFACTION REGARDING SBI LIABILITY TO KEEP PROMISES? 1) Strongly agree 2) Agree 3) Disagree 4) strongly disagree 5. Complaits and grievences are resolved within resoanable time to the satisfaction of customers? 1) Strongly agree 2) Agree 3) Disagree 4) strongly disagree 6. CUSTOMER OPINION REGARDING sbi AS A TRUST WORTHY BANK 1) Strongly agree 2) Agree 3) Disagree 4) strongly disagree 7. LOAN APPROVAL procedure is satisfactory to the customer needs 1) Strongly agree 2) Agree 3) Disagree 4) strongly disagree 8. CUSTOMER are SATISFied REGARDING EMI SCHEMES OFFERED BY SBI
  56. 56. 56 1) Strongly agree 2) Agree 3) Disagree 4) strongly disagree 9. INTEREST RATE CHARGED BY SBI are reasonable 1) Strongly agree 2) Agree 3) Disagree 4) strongly disagree 10 . PROCESSING FEES CHARGED BY SBI is satisfactory 1) Strongly agree 2) Agree 3) Disagree 4) strongly disagree

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