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Pratham Presentation
 

Pratham Presentation

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Detailed outline of the organization Pratham

Detailed outline of the organization Pratham

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  • 1:00 Total – 5:15; 5:00, 12:30, 13:05 = 36 This Section – 4:15 Greetings, thanks, finals week Introduce title Change of title bcos focus on scale, volunteers are a means Good afternoon everyone & Thank You for coming. I realize that it’s finals week so I appreciate your taking out time. So today, as the title of the talk says, I will talk about “Large-Scale Solutions for India’s Broken Primary Education Sector”. As you see, I have changed the title from what it was originally supposed to be – i.e “Mobilizing Unpaid Village Volunteers to Fix Primary Education in India” because actually Pratham’s focus is on scale & volunteers provide an avenue through which this problem can be solved at scale
  • 2:15 Govt. is the key player Access, not quality – MDG as well 2001 SSA – mandate universal primary ed by 2010 Infrastructure – cess RTE – free & compulsary within 1 km; pupil-teacher ratio, number of classrooms; vague about quality Govt. collects info on enrollment, number of teachers, infrastructure There are two important points about the title. The first is that most of the focus in India, and even worldwide, for that matter, has been on providing access to school, rather than on the quality of learning outcomes. The Millenium Development Goals want donors to “ ensure that,by 2015,children everywhere,boys andgirls alike,will be able to complete a full course of primary schooling “ Note it only mentions schooling, and nothing about quality. The second is that when we are talking about primary education in India, we have to look at what the Govt. is doing since it is the only institution that has the reach and the finances to make substantial changes possible. In 2001, Sarva Shikha Abhiyaan, the India Government’s flagship program to universalize primary education was started with the goal that all children complete eight years of elementary schooling by 2010. SSA has helped India make great strides in enrollment. Between 2006 and 2010, there has been a _____ % increase in number of children in school. Today, 96.5% of children in India are enrolled in schools. School infrastructure has also improved considerably, thanks to the SSA being flush with funds, helped by a 3% educational cess that all India citizens have to pay. However, as we saw in the last slide, increased enrollment and better infrastructure has not let to improved learning outcomes. In 2009, the Right to Education Act was passed, which makes primary education free and compulsary for every child between the ages of 6 and 14. The RTE lays down various provisions such as the presence of a school within 1 km of any habitation. It lays down rules for no. of school infrastructure, pupil-teacher ratio, etc. However, it talks about quality in a very vague manner and does not hold the Government accountable to any clearly defined learning measures. The above points highlight the fact that the Government of India has been focused only on inputs, not outcomes. If you look at SSA annual reports, you will see data on enrollment, number of teachers, infrastructure but nothing on learning outcomes. However, things are beginning to change. Due to ASER and other initiatives, there is now much more data available on learning outcomes at the national levels. Politicians and bureaucrats now accept the problem, which was not true a few years ago. There is plenty of supplementary teaching-learning materials available in classrooms now, which was also not true a few years ago. Pratham would like to take credit for some of that. Many Governments now have Learning Excellence Programs and have partnered with NGOs, which is a change in strategy, because the Indian Government has been historically averse to working with NGOs. However, even the LEPs are often poorly planned and don’t have a proper assessment component to them. There is still a lot that needs to be done to get the Government focused on learning outcomes.
  • 3:00
  • 2:15 Govt. is the key player Access, not quality – MDG as well 2001 SSA – mandate universal primary ed by 2010 Infrastructure – cess RTE – free & compulsary within 1 km; pupil-teacher ratio, number of classrooms; vague about quality Govt. collects info on enrollment, number of teachers, infrastructure There are two important points about the title. The first is that most of the focus in India, and even worldwide, for that matter, has been on providing access to school, rather than on the quality of learning outcomes. The Millenium Development Goals want donors to “ ensure that,by 2015,children everywhere,boys andgirls alike,will be able to complete a full course of primary schooling “ Note it only mentions schooling, and nothing about quality. The second is that when we are talking about primary education in India, we have to look at what the Govt. is doing since it is the only institution that has the reach and the finances to make substantial changes possible. In 2001, Sarva Shikha Abhiyaan, the India Government’s flagship program to universalize primary education was started with the goal that all children complete eight years of elementary schooling by 2010. SSA has helped India make great strides in enrollment. Between 2006 and 2010, there has been a _____ % increase in number of children in school. Today, 96.5% of children in India are enrolled in schools. School infrastructure has also improved considerably, thanks to the SSA being flush with funds, helped by a 3% educational cess that all India citizens have to pay. However, as we saw in the last slide, increased enrollment and better infrastructure has not let to improved learning outcomes. In 2009, the Right to Education Act was passed, which makes primary education free and compulsary for every child between the ages of 6 and 14. The RTE lays down various provisions such as the presence of a school within 1 km of any habitation. It lays down rules for no. of school infrastructure, pupil-teacher ratio, etc. However, it talks about quality in a very vague manner and does not hold the Government accountable to any clearly defined learning measures. The above points highlight the fact that the Government of India has been focused only on inputs, not outcomes. If you look at SSA annual reports, you will see data on enrollment, number of teachers, infrastructure but nothing on learning outcomes. However, things are beginning to change. Due to ASER and other initiatives, there is now much more data available on learning outcomes at the national levels. Politicians and bureaucrats now accept the problem, which was not true a few years ago. There is plenty of supplementary teaching-learning materials available in classrooms now, which was also not true a few years ago. Pratham would like to take credit for some of that. Many Governments now have Learning Excellence Programs and have partnered with NGOs, which is a change in strategy, because the Indian Government has been historically averse to working with NGOs. However, even the LEPs are often poorly planned and don’t have a proper assessment component to them. There is still a lot that needs to be done to get the Government focused on learning outcomes.
  • 1:15 ASER – affiliate; annual survey – talk about ASER – Govt. does not do it so Pratham does it One-one one; simple reading and arithmetic Couple of examples – grade II level text; division (grade ___ level) Shockingly few kids can do them ASER Centre, a Pratham affiliate organization, conducts an annual status of education survey across India. Surveyors ask children to read simple letters, words and paragraphs and ask them to do some basic arithmetic. Here are a couple of examples of the questions they ask. The child is asked to read this paragraph. Most of you probably can’t read Hindi but basically this is a Grd II level paragraph. Let’s look at the numbers for India. Only about 50% of children in Grade V could read the Grade II text. For Math, it’s no better – only 36% of children in Grade V can do division. What level comptency is division? Which grade?
  • 0:45 Numbers hardly changed Poor learning – dropout The worrying thing is that the numbers have hardly changed since 2006, when the ASER survey was first done. And of course, since children don’t learn much in school, they struggle in higher grades. There are approximately 130 million children enrolled in primary school in India. The enrollment numbers in middle school drops to just 5 million.
  • 3:00
  • 3:00
  • 2:00 How does Govt. partnership work? Chhatisgarh – example of how you take a demo model to scale Example shows big learning level improvements are possible
  • 3:00
  • Presenter: Madhav WCO-ZXF893-20070509-34115
  • Presenter: Madhav WCO-ZXF893-20070509-34115

Pratham Presentation Pratham Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Pratham & Read India PRATHAM
  • Pratham’s Accolades
  • Major Supporters
    • Largest education NGO in India
    • Founded in 1994 with urban focus
    • Rural Programs started in 2002
    • Working in 21 out of 28 states; 258 out of ~600 districts
    • Teaching basic literacy and numeracy skills for primary school children (illiterate parents)
    • 2.2 million children
    • 62,000 unpaid volunteers
    About Pratham & Read India PRATHAM
    • Government system is failing India
    • Government focused on input (access to schools), not outcomes (learning levels)
    • Achieved near universal enrollment (96.5%)
    • Improved school infrastructure
    • Right to Education Act 2009 focuses on access to schools
    Is the education system equipping people with the right skills? PRATHAM
  • ASER – A nationwide survey on learning levels
    • Only nationwide data on learning levels
    • Within 100 days, every rural district reached – 15,000 villages & 700,000 children
    • 25,000 volunteers donate 4 days of their time to achieve this mammoth task
    PRATHAM
    • ASER 2010 : % of children in different grades who can read this text
      • Grade 3: 19.5%
      • Grade 4: 37.9%
      • Grade 5: 53.7%
    • ASER 2010 : % of children who can do this kind of division
      • Grade 4: 21.8%
      • Grade 5: 35.9%
    PRATHAM Grade 2 Level Text Division
  • PRATHAM
    • Government thinks pouring more money will solve the problem
    • Community thinks that children are going to school – so they must be learning
    • % of private schools up from 18.8% (2006) to 24.3% (2010)
    Equating Schooling with Learning PRATHAM
    • Use data to mobilize Government
    • Use simple tools to mobilize communities
    • Every child in school and learning well
    • Low cost, infrastructure light
    • Make learning fun
    • Show Results
    Our Approach – Top Down and Bottom Up PRATHAM
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  • Government Partnerships – The Punjab Example PRATHAM
    • Not enough to focus on inputs (# of schools, books, meals)
    • Constant innovation on scale is needed
    • For models to be scalable, they must be simple and low cost
    • Ordinary people participate on large scale if model is simple to execute
    • Governments can be influenced with good data
    • Whole ecosystem must change, government and community
    Lessons PRATHAM
  • Donations Received 2010-2011
  • Program Expenditure 2010-2011
  • Meet Deepa Deepa Thappa, Primary School Chakarpur   Deepa is currently in grade two. Her sister, who is six years old, attends school along with her. In her spare time, Deepa enjoys watching her favorite show Tom and Jerry. Her favorite subjects include Hindi, English and math. She dreams to become a teacher one day, so that she can help young children in her village, read and write. PRATHAM
  • Meet Rajesh Rajesh Singh, Primary School Nathupur   Rajesh Singh is in grade 5 and cycles to school every day, which takes him about one hour. Since his mother doesn’t keep very well, he attends school during the day and helps his brother Arjun with his machine repair shop in the evenings. The family survives on whatever comes from the repair shop. Rajesh struggles to get up early in the morning and study before he leaves for school. His ambition is to become an engineer one day. PRATHAM
  • You Can Create an Impact
    • $25,000 will transform 100 villages – training 200 teachers in digital literacy to teach 2000 children reading, writing and math for an entire year.
    • $15,000 will focus on 2000 children for an entire year in 100 villages, getting them into school if they are not, and supporting children falling behind.
    • $5,000 will keep 150 children in school for an entire year through an urban learning center, increasing retention, learning and the quality of instruction.
    • $1,000 will fund the survey of 1400 children , to assess their current reading and writing level for one year.
    PRATHAM
  • Questions? Email kkumar@prathamusa.org www.pratham.org www.asercentre.org PRATHAM