BUSINESS CLASS
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  • 1. BUSINESS CLASS ETIQUETTE ESSENTIALS FOR SUCCESS AT WORK
  • 2.
    • From:- Kaushal Agrawal
  • 3. 1.1 FIRST IMPRESSION
    • IT TAKES 20 YEARS TO BUILD A REPUTATION AND 5 MINUTES TO RUIN IT. IF YOU THINK ABOUT THAT, YOU’LL DO THINGS DIFFERENTLY.
    • YOU DON’T GET 2 ND CHANCE TO MAKE A FIRST IMPRESSION.
    • BEST WAY-BE ON TIME AND PREPARED
  • 4. 1.2 FIRST IMPRESSION…… UNCOMMON COMMON SENSE
    • GIVE A FIRM HANDSHAKE
    • SAY “PLEASE”, “THANK YOU” AND EXCUSE ME”
    • DON’T INTERRUPT OR FINISH A PERSON’S SENTENCE
    • RETURN PHONE CALLS PROMPTLY
    • BE PUNCTUAL
  • 5. 1.3.1 FIRST IMPRESSION….. DURING MEETING
    • FIND OUT WHO YOU’LL BE MEETING. USE EACH PERSON’S NAME SEVERAL TIME IN CONVERSATION.
    • TAKE NOTES ON INDEX CARDS AND REVIEW THEN JUST BEFORE THE MEETING.
    • FAMILIARIZE YOURSELF WITH THE INDUSTRY
    • READ OVER AGENDA AND SUGGEST ANY CHANGES BEFORE MEETING
  • 6. 1.3.2 FIRST IMPRESSION….. DURING MEETING
    • IF YOU’RE CHAIRING-MAKE SURE EVERYBODY CONTRIBUTES
    • IF YOU’RE CHAIRING-MAKE A “ CALL TO ACTION ” LIST AND DOCUMENT WHO IS GOING TO FOLLOW UP ON CERTAIN TASKS. ASSIGN DEADLINE FOR EACH TASK.
    • DISTRIBUTE MINUTES WITHIN 24-HRS.
  • 7. 1.4 FIRST MEETING….BEFRIEND THE GATEKEEPER
    • 91% OF EXECUTIVES CONSIDER OPINION OF THEIR JUNIORS IN BUSINESS DECISIONS.
    • WHEN YOU MEET AN EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT, SHAKE HIS HAND AND ACKNOWLEDGE HIM BY NAME.
    • THANK HIM BY NAME WHEN YOU LEAVE.
    • DURING FOLLOW-UP, USE HIS NAME IN CONVERSATION AND EXCHANGE PLEASANTRIES BEFORE ASKING TO SPEAK WITH THE SENIOR.
  • 8. 2.1 SMALL TOUCHES EQUAL BIG BUSINESS
    • MAKE THE CUSTOMER FEEL THAT HE IS YOUR ONLY CUSTOMER.
    • IF YOU OFFEND A CLIENT, THE FINANCIAL PINCH WILL EVENTUALLY TAKE ITS TOLL.
    • IT COSTS 500% MORE TO ATTRACT A NEW CUSTOMER THAN TO RETAIN A CURRENT ONE
  • 9. 2.2 SMALL TOUCHES EQUALS BIG BUSINESS…….DOS
    • SMILING AND CHEERFULLY GREETING A COWORKER
    • REMEMBERING A CLIENT’S OR HIS CHILD’S NAME
    • ASKING ABOUT SOMEONE’S AILING FRIEND OR FAMILY MEMBER
  • 10. 2.3 SMALL TOUCHES EQUALS BIG BUSINESS….DONTs
    • FORGETTING TO RETURN AN IMPORTANT PHONE CALL
    • TAKING TOO LONG TO RESPOND TO SOMEONE’S REQUEST.
    • NEGLECTING TO THANK SOMEONE WHO HAS HELPED YOU COMPLETE A PROJECT.
    • FORGETTING TO DO SOMETHING YOU SAID YOU’RE GOING TO DO.
  • 11. 2.4.1 SMALL TOUCHES EQUALS BIG BUSINESS….
    • IN THE WORKPLACE, GENEROUS PAY AND HEFTY BENEFITS DON’T MAKE UP FOR FAILURE TO TREAT EMPLOYEES WELL.
    • NEVER BERATE OR DEMORALIZE A CLIENT OR COWORKER IN PUBLIC.
    • THE ABILITY TO GET ALONG WITH PEOPLE IS AS ASSET BEYOND PRICE.
  • 12. 2.4.2 SMALL TOUCHES EQUALS BIG BUSINESS….
    • IF YOU CAN’T COMPLETE A TASK ON TIME OR STAY WITHIN THE AGREED-UPON BUDGET, NOTIFY YOUR CLIENTS OR COWORKERS IMMEDIATELY.
    • ADMIT MISTAKES -SUCCESS COMES WHEN YOU FOCUS ON THE SOLUTIONS RATHER THAN DWELLING ON THE PROBLEMS.
  • 13. 2.4.3 SMALL TOUCHES EQUALS BIG BUSINESS….
    • YOU’RE BOUND TO ENCOUNTER CLIENTS, CUSTOMERS AND COWORKERS WHO TEST YOUR PATIENCE OR AUTHORITY OR ABILITY.
    • WHEN YOU’RE BOILING INSIDE, NEVER LET OTHER SEE YOU COME UNGLUED.
    • SPEAK FAVORABLY OF PAST CLIENTS.
  • 14. 3.1.1 S UIT U P F OR S UCCESS
    • CLOTHES AND MANNERS DO NOT MAKE THE MAN; BUT, WHEN HE IS MADE, THEY GREATLY IMPROVE HIS APPEARANCE.
    • WALT DISNEY CASE -IF YOU WANT TO HEIGHTEN YOUR COMPANY’S LEVEL OF PROFESSIONALISM, IMPLEMENT A DRESS CODE.
  • 15. 3.1.2S UIT U P F OR S UCCESS
    • NICE APPEARANCE ENHANCES YOUR PERSONAL BRAND
    • IT ENHANCES YOUR OVERALL PACKAGE
    • IT PAYS BIG DIVIDENDS
    • IT GETS YOUR FOOT IN THE DOOR
  • 16. 3.1.3 S UIT U P F OR S UCCESS
    • CARRY A QUALITY PEN
    • INVEST IN A FEW GOOD SUITS
    • BUY QUALITY, NOT QUANTITY
    • BEWARE OF BULKY BAGGAGE
    • NEAT POLISHED SHOES
  • 17. 3.2 S UIT U P F OR S UCCESS….SPEAKING PROFESSIONALY
    • KEEP YOUR ELBOWS OFF THE BOARDROOM TABLE
    • LOWER YOUR PITCH
    • AVOID FILLER WORDS
    • PARK YOUR PERSONAL PROBLEMS AT HOME
    • ACCEPT COMPLIMENTS AND GIVE THEM GENEROUSLY
  • 18. 4.1 M ASTER Y OUR M INGLE- A BILITY
    • A SINGLE CONVERSATION WITH A WISE MAN IS BETTER THAN 10 YEARS OF STUDY- CHINESE PROVERB
    • Networking can be difficult if you can’t put a smile and mingle.
    • It requires study and practice before it becomes 2 nd nature.
  • 19. 4.2.1 R ULES O F N ETWORKING
    • SEE AND BE SEEN
    • 1. Join professional organizations, associations, and other groups that need your talents.
    • 2. Volunteer to serve on boards and committee.
    • 3. Give presentations at industry associations.
    • 4. Get involved in extra-curricular activities.
    • 5. Hone your public honing skills.
  • 20. 4.2.2 R ULES O F N ETWORKING
    • GIVE A FIRM HANDSHAKE
    • All introductions, regardless of participant’s gender, should be accompanies with a firm handshake.
    • Stand and shake.
    • Should be short and accompanied with a smile and good eye contact.
    • In business meeting, a man or a woman can initiate a handshake. In social setting, it is acceptable for a man to wait for a woman to initiate.
    • Shake hands, then pause briefly before releasing.
  • 21. 4.3.1 W INNING T HE N AME G AME
    • Remembering names is an essential skill for success. It makes them feel closer and more connected to you.
    • When introduced to someone, say the person’s name immediately. Always conclude the conversation by saying the person’s name.
    • Associate a person’s name with a character or a movie star. Eg. Sunny, Akshay
    • Turn names into visual images. Eg. Ramesh Teli
    • When someone gives a business card, look at the name and say it silently to yourself.
  • 22.
    • 5. If a person doesn’t say his name clearly the first time, ask him to repeat it.
    • 6. Don’t be embarrassed if you forget names from time to time.
    • 7. If you can’t recall someone’s name, extend your hand and say your name.
    • 8. If you can’t remember someone’s name but can recall where you met him, mention that information.
    • 9. Don’t try to remember too many names at once.
  • 23. 4.4.1 More tips for networking
    • Make friends first.
    • Goal of networking is to cultivate relationships and gain a person’s trust.
    • “ You can make more friends in 2 months by becoming more interested in other people than you can in 2 years by trying to get other people interested in you”.
    • Help others and you help yourself.
    • Know why you’re attending the meeting or event and keep in mind whom you hope to meet or see again.
  • 24. 4.4.2 More tips for networking
    • You must first be willing to embrace new people and the ideas, suggestions or opportunities they present to you.
    • Don’t make a beeline for the food as soon as you walk into the room. Mingle first, eat later.
    • Don’t overindulge in drinks.
    • Don’t socialize only with people you know. Introduce yourself to a group of fresh faces or someone who is sitting alone.
  • 25. 4.4.3 More tips for networking
    • When you and a colleague attend an event together, sit at separate tables.
    • Don’t leave home without your business cards.
    • It’s best to wait for someone to request your card before giving it out.
    • Respect a person’s time.
    • If you’re new to a gathering, you can help yourself by – Pretending you’re the host, ask a “connector” for help or volunteer to help.
  • 26. 4.4.4 More tips for networking
    • Always introduce like this-”Mr. More Important, I’d like to introduce to you Mr. Less Important.”
    • Call or send an e-mail after meeting.
    • Send magazine or newspaper clippings.
    • Send a congratulatory note.
    • Send an electronic newsletter
  • 27. 5.1 S MALL T ALK S AVVY A ND E FFECTIVE L ISTENING
    • EDMOND-”Never speak of yourself to others; make them talk about themselves instead; therein lies the whole art of pleasing. Everybody knows it, and everyone forgets it.”
    • FRANK TYGER-”Be a good listener. Your ears will never get you in trouble.”
    • CARDUCCI-”The key to successful small talk is learning how to connect with others, not just talk with them”
  • 28. 5.2 Rules of being small-talk savvy
    • Ask good questions and then listen-eg. “Tell me…” or “What do you enjoy most about…”. Focus more on other person.
    • Identify a bond or commonality you share with another person.
    • Give a sincere compliment
    • Know a little about a lot of things-Haave a few clean jokes and a couple of interesting things to talk, don’t be boring.
    • Don’t exclude spouses and partners
  • 29. 5.3.1 six conversation stoppers
    • The Braggart-How much money I have
    • The Rumor Monger-Tries to make everybody’s business his own. Change the subject or exclude yourself
    • The One-Upper-Wants you to know whatever you’ve done, he was there first. Be patient and give some attention. Listen and ask questions about the topic
  • 30. 5.3.2 six conversation stoppers
    • The Hard-Hearted: Often talks out of turn and says whatever is on her mind without any regard for others’ feelings. Dispel a –ve comment with a kind or humorous response.
    • The Pick-Your-Brainer: He is a taker, not a giver. Always looking for free advice. Don’t give free advice
  • 31. 5.3.6 six conversation stoppers
    • The Rambler: Tends to monopolize the conversation or talk about himself. A chronic nonlistner. A. Introduce him to someone else. B. Excuse yourself-”I need to go to restroom”. C. Get another person involved D. Use I.S.A.C.-Interrupt, summarize, ask, conclude. Participate in the conversation and when you feel the time is right, you can diplomatically close the conversation.
  • 32. 5.4.1 Effective Listening
    • If you’re not listening, you’re not learning.
    • Like a doctor, you first have to listen to others, then ask questions, check for symptoms, diagnose a situation, and prescribe proper treatment.
    • Always practice attentive listening over selective listening.
  • 33. 5.4.2 Effective Listening
    • Look him in eyes, use his name in conversation, and respond in a way that they know you are really listening.
    • If other person is busy, don’t just walk away without any type of closure-it could make you appear uninterested or rude and could hurt your chances of connecting with him again
  • 34. 5.5.1 ten ways to become a better listener
    • Ask pertinent questions.
    • Practice empathic listening: stand for a moment in another’s shoes and seeing the world through that person’s eyes
    • Nod occasionally, make eye contact, take notes, watch speaker’s facial expressions, hand gestures and eye contact.
    • Share personal stories
    • Paint a visual picture-This will help you follow and understand a story and remember it.
  • 35. 5.5.2 ten ways to become a better listener
    • Don’t interrupt
    • Pause before you reply
    • Eliminate distractions
    • Speak with a purpose-most brilliant people speak only when they have something important or profound to say
    • Don’t give unsolicited advice
  • 36. 6.1 Dining for Rupees: The Art of the meal
    • 49% of CFOs said their most successful business meetings, outside the office, were conducted at a restaurant.
    • There is no excuse for bad manners like- bread dunking, finger licking, teeth picking, etc.
    • “ Bad table manners signal insensitivity to others, an overly self-interested person, and an incomplete education.”
  • 37. 6.2.1 How to avoid 15 most common dining mistakes
    • Don’t butter a bread directly from the butter dish. Bread should never be dunked in your soup.
    • It is not necessary for a man to pull out a woman’s chair or stand when a woman approaches or leaves the table. Whoever reaches the door first should open it for the other person.
  • 38. 6.2.2 How to avoid 15 most common dining mistakes
    • If you drop a piece of silverware on floor, leave it and ask for another.
    • Pass the salt and pepper shakers together, even if someone asks you to pass one or the other.
    • Don’t pick your teeth at the table.
    • Don’t apply lipstick, or touch your hair at the table.
    • Don’t put your handbag, keys, notebook or cell phone on table. Set your cell phone on silent or vibrate mode.
    • Don’t thank the server each time you’re served.
  • 39. 6.2.3 How to avoid 15 most common dining mistakes
    • After using sugar packet, fold the paper and place it underneath plate or saucer
    • If you eat something you can’t swallow, remove it with your thumb and index finger and place it on the edge of your plate.
    • Don’t dip, take a bite and dip same thing again.
    • Don’t push your plate or stack you dishes after finishing.
  • 40. 6.2.4 How to avoid 15 most common dining mistakes
    • Wait until everyone at your table has been served.
    • Don’t tuck your napkin into your collar or use it as a handkerchief. Place it on your lap after the host does it. After meal place it neatly at the left of plate.
    • When passing food, offer some to your neighbor first before serving yourself, and then pass food counterclockwise.
  • 41. 6.3.1 First Course: An Introductory Meeting-strategies
    • Choose a known place convenient to guest and according to his food liking.
    • If you’re in an unfamiliar city find out the menu, etc. well ahead. Try to keep a database of restaurants.
    • Not necessary to go to expensive place if neither of you can enjoy.
  • 42. 6.3.2 First Course: An Introductory Meeting-strategies
    • Pay in advance-make certain check is not brought to table.
    • Request a table in a quiet location, away from restrooms, cash register, kitchen or entry. If you’re with one person, sit diagonally instead of across. With several guest give the most prominent guest seat to your right side.
    • Guest orders and is served first, while host orders and is served last.
  • 43. 6.3.3 First Course: An Introductory Meeting-strategies
    • If you’ve fixed budget say like-”The noodles here are very famous”.
    • Host should order same no. of courses as the guest.
    • Pace your speed according to other diners’ speed.
    • You should leave a small portion uneaten.
    • Eat first, talk business later. If unsure, follow his decision.
    • Order items that easy to eat.
  • 44. 6.4 U SING U TENSILS
    • FORK-Left side and spoon or knife on right side of plate.
    • Bread plate right side and glass on right side of plate.
    • Spoons for coffee and tea to be brought with the cups.
    • Use continental style-widely accepted, sophisticated and efficient
  • 45. 6.4.2 Using Utensils… Continental Style
    • Fork in left hand, tines downward, knife in right hand.
    • After cutting bring food to your mouth with fork tines down.
    • For break between bites-place utensils in crisscross position on lower part of plate.
    • When you finish place utensils side by side on a slant at center at 10:20 o’ clock position.
  • 46. 6.4.3 E ATING F OODS Y OU D ISLIKE AND H ANDLING A CCIDENTS G RACEFULLY
    • Eat what you can, move rest around on your plate, pretend to take a few bites and chat with tablemates.
    • When things go wrong, stay calm until the crisis is under control. If you don’t make a big deal out of things, people are very forgiving.
  • 47. 6.5 On breakfast
    • Never use toast to wipe your plate clean.
    • Avoid striking the sides of cup with spoon while stirring.
    • Avoid overloading. On going back for more, leave dirty plate on table and use a new clean plate.
    • Don’t dunk tea bag too much.
  • 48. 6.6 Private dinner parties
    • Guest should include those you know, those you would like to know better and those invited only for their attraction.
    • Separate couples, those who work together or those who know each other extremely well.
    • Put together who may strike up a business.
    • As a guest don’t switch too many places.
    • Offer a diverse menu considering guests’ peferences.
  • 49. 6.7 Be the best guest
    • Respond regardless of whether or not you plan to attend.
    • Bring a gift, but don’t expect the host to show your gift at the party.
    • Don’t forget to say good-bye and thank you before you leave.
  • 50. 7.1.1 T ELEPHONE C OURTESIES
    • Always begin by identifying yourself and your company.
    • Always try to tall during normal business hours only.
    • Ask permission before putting someone on hold
    • Before transferring give name of person with whom the caller will be speaking.
  • 51. 7.1.2 T ELEPHONE C OURTESIES
    • If call is going nowhere politely say “Excuse me, I’ve another appointment. May I call back or follow up with e-mail?”
    • If someone walks into your office while you’re on phone, the caller takes priority unless the other person has an appointment.
  • 52. 7.1.3 T ELEPHONE C OURTESIES
    • If call waiting is on, refrain from answering when you’re talking to your boss or customer.
    • Always return phone calls.
    • Normally, take permission before putting somebody on a speakerphone or conference.
    • One who initiates a conference call introduces all participants.
    • On leaving a voice message, be brief. Conclude with phone no. and best time to call you.
  • 53. 7.1.4 T ELEPHONE C OURTESIES
    • Keep you voice mail upto date. Let callers know whom to call in your absence.
    • In fax-write recepient’s name, department, no. of pages, etc.
    • Call before faxing a multipage document.
    • In fax, use a slightly large font.
  • 54. 7.2.1 E-mail courtesies
    • E-mails should be used for simple matters, such as a notification of arrival or scheduling an appintment.
    • Important issues like discussing contracts, negotiations or proposals and communication with new client should be done in person or by phone.
    • Always use subject line to inform.
    • In business mails, don’t be casual.
  • 55. 7.2.2 E- mail C OURTESIES
    • Try to use other person’s surname until he responds with a mail signed with his first name.
    • Try to always use a signature line containing your first and last name, title, company and contact information.
    • Use *wonderful* instead of WONDERFUL to emphasize.
    • Skip fancy decorations in business mails.
  • 56. 7.2.3 E- mail C OURTESIES
    • Keep it brief, but not abrupt
    • No e-mail is private, they can be forwarded or printed.
    • Avoid shooting mails when you’re angry.
    • Generally, don’t try to congratulate over mail. Handwritten notes or meeting in person is better.
  • 57. 7.2.4 E- mail C OURTESIES
    • Check for spelling or grammar before you send.
    • If you don’t want to reveal all the addresesses to which you’re sending, put those addresses in BCC.
    • Use “Reply all” cautiously.
    • Don’t send the same message if you don’t get reply for the first one.
    • Send attachments only with permission.
    • Use out-of-office auto-respond feature when you’re not available.
    • E-mail devices should not be used in meetings.
  • 58. 8.1.1 H OW T O A VOID A N I NTERNATIONAL I NCIDENT
    • Notice how other people act, dress and treat each other.
    • If you don’t understand why someone does something a certain way or says something unfamiliar, ask.
    • Keep open mind: Different cultures interpret same gesture differently.
    • Don’t say negatively about other cultures publicly.
  • 59. 8.1.2 H OW T O A VOID A N I NTERNATIONAL I NCIDENT
    • Try to be informed about other cultures.
    • Listen more and talk less to learn.
    • Learn a few phrases of language of country you’re visiting.
    • Try to use surnames and professional titles.
    • If you’re not sure how to greet an international visitor, start with a handshake or follow the person’s lead
    • At www.executiveplanet.com free info on different cultures is available
  • 60. 9.1 P OWER O F P OSITIVE T HANKING
    • Whenever someone gives you their time, advice or a helping hand, that’s reason enough to express your gratitude.
    • Donald Trump-”If you say thank you people consider you thoughtful, responsible and aware”
    • Just thinking about what you’re grateful for can increase your happiness.
    • Gratitude fosters positive emotions that in turn boost you immune system.
  • 61. 9.2 H OW T O W RITE T HANK Y OU N OTES
    • Write by hand unless you’ve a very bad handwriting.
    • Should be short, simple and meaningful
    • Use good stationary. One way some people determine the quality of product is by looking at the quality of stationary
    • Should be prompt, but better late than never.
    • E-greetings are okay to send to friends but not to clients, colleagues or business associates.
  • 62. 9.3 G IFTS
    • Check other company’s gift policy.
    • Try to send gifts during working period of year instead of holidays.
    • Send fun or unique gifts.
    • Take the time to find out what your client will enjoy and use as gift.
    • If you send a gift to somebody who seem to have everything try to make a donation to his favorite charity.
  • 63. 9.4 Other small things
    • View –ve feedback also as a gift.
    • Thank also those you won’t be working with
    • Stay connected after a sale
    • Throw a party to everyone atleast once in a year.
    • Give a status report of the job to one who referred you the same even if it turned successful or not.
  • 64. SOME FINAL THOUGHTS
    • The essence of etiquette is courtesy and consideration, and the greatest courtesy we can give others is the warmth of our friendliness. As long as we’re considerate of others’ feelings, opinions, and values, we’re exercising the innate courtesy on which all good manners are based.
    • Most people are inherently good-we just don’t get credit for it.
  • 65.
    • Thanks for your Valuable Time