Communication across culture

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Communication across culture

  1. 1. © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-1
  2. 2. © 2006 Prenti Hall 4-2 Pranav Kulshrestha(Vadodara(India)) Vadodara Institute Of Engineering(GTU) www.twitter.com/pranavkuls www.instagram.com/pranavkuls www.linkedin.com/in/pranavkuls www.facebook.com/pranavkuls http://www.plus.google.com/+PranavKulshrestha21 Skype and Wechat ID : pranavkuls
  3. 3. Cultural communications are deeper and more complex than spoken or written messages. The essence of effective cross-cultural communication has more to do with releasing the right responses than with sending the “right” messages. —Hall and Hall © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-3
  4. 4.  Managers spend between 50% and 90% of their time talking to people  Managers communicate to:  Coordinate activities  Disseminate information  Motivate people  Negotiate future plans © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-4
  5. 5. © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-5
  6. 6.  Cultural Noise – cultural variables that undermine the communication of intended meaning  Intercultural communication – when the member of one culture sends a message to a member of another culture  Attribution – the process in which people look for an explanation of another person‟s behavior © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-6
  7. 7.  Attitudes – ethnocentric and stereotypical attitudes are a particular source of noise in cross-cultural communication  Social Organization – nations, tribes, religious sects, or professions can influence our priorities and values  Though Patterns – the logical progression of reasoning varies by culture © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-7
  8. 8.  Roles – the perception of the manager‟s role differs considerable around the world, consider the conversation between the American and Greek  Nonverbal Communication – behavior communicated without words; even minor variations in body language, speech rhythms, and punctuality can cause mistrust © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-8
  9. 9.  Language – an inability to speak the local language, and a poor or too literal translation are often causes for mistrust  Pepsi‟s slogan “Come Alive with Pepsi” translated into German as “Come out of the grave.”  Rendezvous lounges on 747‟s were not used on airlines because in Portuguese „rendezvous‟ refers to prostitution © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-9
  10. 10. Britain and America are two nations separated by a common language. - George Bernard Shaw © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-10
  11. 11.  Mono-chronic Cultures – Time is experienced in a linear manner; generally mono-chronic people concentrate on one thing at a time and adhere to time commitments  Poly-chronic Cultures – Many things occur simultaneously and emphasize involvement with people © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-11
  12. 12.  Context in which the communication takes place affects the meaning and interpretation of the interaction  Cultures are either high- or low- context © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-12
  13. 13. © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-13
  14. 14.  Communication varies according to  Where and how it originates  The channels and the speed which it flows  Whether it is formal or informal  The nature of the organization‟s information system are affected by  Organizational structure  Staffing policies  Leadership style © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-14
  15. 15.  The Internet as a global medium for communication allows companies to develop a presence in markets globally  Companies must adapt their web communication to deal with local cultural variables © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-15
  16. 16.  Cultural Sensitivity  Careful Encoding  Selective Transmission  Careful Decoding  Appropriate Follow-up Actions © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-16
  17. 17.  Respect (eye contact, posture, tone, etc)  Interaction posture – ability to respond in a descriptive, non-evaluative, and non- judgmental way  Orientation to knowledge – understand that your beliefs and perceptions are only valid for you and not everyone else  Empathy © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-17
  18. 18.  Interaction management  Tolerance for ambiguity  Other-oriented role behavior – capacity to be flexible and to adopt different roles for the sake of the greater group cohesion/communication © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-18
  19. 19.  When sending a message make it a point to know the recipient  Encode the message in a form that will most likely be understood as it is intended  This means the manager must  Be aware of their own culture  The recipient‟s culture  The expectations surrounding the situation © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-19
  20. 20. © 2006 Prentice Hall 4-20
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