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Tyler Maiman's Thesis
 

Tyler Maiman's Thesis

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Tyler Maiman's BS degree thesis.

Tyler Maiman's BS degree thesis.

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    Tyler Maiman's Thesis Tyler Maiman's Thesis Document Transcript

    • small spaces tyler maiman
    • ContentsBrief.................................................................................................... 5Premier Inspiration............................................................................ 6Urbanization...................................................................................10 Why Cities................................................................................. 18 Globally...................................................................................... 22Today’s Small Spaces......................................................................30 BOXHOME................................................................................. 34 Maff Apartment......................................................................... 36 Domestic Transformer............................................................. 38 Monolocale................................................................................ 40 Finger Apartments.................................................................... 42 Yacht Interior Design................................................................. 44 Winnebago Bus Design............................................................ 46 The Scarecrow “one room house”.......................................... 48 Japanese Style Thinking.......................................................... 50Small Problems............................................................................... 526 Wall Thinking................................................................................ 58Functional Practices....................................................................... 64 Wall Partitions........................................................................... 66 Terence Conran......................................................................... 68Interviews....................................................................................... 72 Stacey Fishkin.......................................................................... 75 Sami Rintala.............................................................................. 76 Petra Wilhelmina....................................................................... 77 Markie Melo............................................................................... 78 Summary.................................................................................... 79Future Appliances/ Technology...................................................... 80Conclusion..................................................................................... 86References..................................................................................... 88
    • I am designing for theyoung professional ur-ban dweller that has justmoved into a densely pop-ulated city, such as NewYork City. There are manyeveryday problems of liv-ing small, but with muchresearch and intelligentdesign practices there aresolutions to make theseliving spaces feel like justthe right size. 5
    • PrimaryInspiration 6
    • 7
    • In April of 2010 I participated in Electro-lux’s annual Design Lab Competition. Elec-trolux is a company that focuses on innova-tive design of home appliances that tend tothe real needs of customers. In their 2010Design Lab Competition they concentratedon what they call “The 2nd Space Age” andprovided its participants with this brief: “ ElectroluxDesign Lab 2010 invitesglobal undergraduate and graduate indus-trial design students to create home ap-pliances that consider shrinking domesticspaces. Your ideas will shape how peopleprepare and store food, wash clothes, anddo dishes in the homes of 2050 when 74%*of the world’s population are predicted tolive in an urban environment. Growingpopulations living in concentrated areasdictate a need for greater space efficiency. ”8
    • As I went through my research anddesign phases I constantly reminded my-self of the statistic they used in their brief.In 2050, 74% of the world’s population ispredicted to live in an urban environment.This is the foreseen trend prediction of ourworld’s future. As much as I was just looking at it asa design challenge, I kept coming back tothe fact that this was a reality. After I submitted my design for a fu-ture home appliance I kept thinking, howis this flood of people moving into urbanenvironments going to affect the design ofthese domestic spaces and the productswe own, especially when there is a needfor greater space efficiency? 9
    • Urbanization10
    • 11
    • People were once nomadic. We were hunters andgatherers traveling the land to provide for our familiesand create a safe and healthy life for ourselves. But wenever were stagnant until we started to grow crops andraise animals. This approach caused us to settle anddevelop villages, which gradually matured into largertowns. Soon enough these towns attracted a diverseassortment of people and developed into structured so-cieties. Laws eventually became established, religionwas developed and markets full of all the necessaryservices were formed. These towns were now constantly growing intowhat today is known as a “city”, and lifestyles began tochange. With this congregation of people and knowl-edge, technology advanced to new heights and creat-ed more of an industrial economy. With the realizationthat machines could do work much faster than peoplecould, people began to leave their country side farmsand started to urbanize. This shift of farming to factoryworking changed many people’s lives. 12
    • Each block on the map illustrates one county in the US.The height of each block is proportional to that county’spopulation density in the year 2000, so the volume of theblock is proportional to the county’s total population. Thecolor of each block shows the county’s projected changein population between 1970 and 2030, with shades of or-ange denoting increases and blue denoting decreases.The patterns of recent population change, with growthconcentrated along the coasts, in cities, and in the Southand West, are projected to continue. - United States Global Change Research Program 13
    • 1900 40%“America is becoming more urban.The fraction of Americans living incities increased from 40% in 1900to more than 75% today and thisincrease is projected to continue.” - United States Global Change Research Program 14
    • 2010 75% 15
    • “In 1800, only 3 percent ofthe world’s population livedin urban areas. By 1900,almost 14 percent were ur-banites, although only 12cities had 1 million or moreinhabitants. In 1950, 30 per-cent of the world’s popula-tion resided in urban cen-ters.”-Population Reference Bureau 1800 1900 1950 16
    • “In 2008, for the first time, the world’s population wasevenly split between urban and rural areas.” -Population Reference Bureau rural urban 17
    • Why Cities?18
    • 19
    • Cities make a lot of sense for humans. Rather than being spread out over large masses of land, in rural areas, people can be gathered in a well-developed, structured metropolis. In these cities it is easier for government and others to provide necessary resources such as water, electricity, health, transportation and education to the masses.Photograph by Isaac Alongi 20
    • The convenience of commerce is also avail-able at almost every street corner. With thisefficiency of providing services, cities es-tablished strong economies and generatedlarge scale job opportunities.Beyond the essentials that a city offers,these urban agglomerations provide a greatdeal of activities for your free time. You canvisit museums, parks, theaters, concertsand many historic attractions. -United Nation Population Fund 21
    • This is currently happening globally“The world is undergoing the largestwave of urban growth in history.” -United Nation Population Fund 22
    • Tokyo, Japan, Hong Kong,China, Cairo, Egypt and NewYork City, New York are someof the world most populatedcities. With the past trend ofmore and more people inhab-iting these cities, certain mea-sures are going to have to betaken into account to preparefor this urbanization. 23
    • 21 21 NEW YORK 21 MEXICO CITY KINSH10 Total projected population by 2025 (in millions) Projected Population by 2025 SAU PAULO Population in 2005 Population in 1950 24
    • 36 26 22 19 DELHI 16 SHANGHAI CAIRO 17 TOKYO MUMBAIHASA This world map shows the evolution of population growth and the United Nations’ projected popula- tion for the urban agglomeration in 2025 for the Urban Age cities and some of the largest and fast- est growing urban centers around the world. 25
    • Compact Livingin ChinaPhotography by Michael Wolf 26
    • 27
    • “the next few decades will see an unprecedented scale of urbangrowth in the developing world. This will be particularly notable inAfrica and Asia where the urban population will double between2000 and 2030: That is, the accumulated urban growth of thesetwo regions during the whole span of history will be duplicated ina single generation. By 2030, the towns and cities of the develop-ing world will make up 81 per cent of urban humanity.” -UN Population Fund Photograph by Alfredo WangCairo, Egypt Photograph by Alfredo Wang 28
    • Tokyo, Japan“by 2030, more than half of all Asiansand Africans will live in urban areas” -Cities of The Future 29
    • Today’sSmallSpaces30
    • 31
    • Small, if doneright, may beconsidered justthe right size.32
    • There are many positives to living small.Smaller spaces require much less energywhich also means much lower bills.They require less building resources whichthen have a lower impact on the environment.They also limit what you buy so you don’tstart to collect excess clothing, furniture andappliances you cannot store. 33
    • BOXHOME 200 sq. ft. By: Sami Rintala Oslo, Norway 34
    • This living space, designed in 2007 by the archi-tect Sami Rintala, is 200sq. ft. and is located inOslo, Norway. BOXHOME insures the basic livingfunctions by providing a kitchen with dining, bath-room, living room and bedroom.“The design is therefore a testimony that less ismore. While reducing floor area by taking out theredundant unnecessary space and working onoptimizing the rest, a great emphasis is placed onthe quality of space, sunlight, as well as material.The process results in a significant reduction inconstruction cost to 1/4 of the price of any samesize apartment being built in the same area.” -Camille Chami 35
    • Maff Apartment 323 sq. ft.36 By: Queeste Architecten The Hague, Netherlands 36
    • This living space, designed by Queeste Architec-ten, is 323 sq. ft. and is located in The Hague,Netherlands. Maff apartment is designed to ac-commodate 2 people, a dining area for up to 4people, a kitchen, a toilet, a bathroom with a show-er and various storage facilities.“The goal of the design was to create a living envi-ronment that would be spacious despite the smallvolume, providing all the comforts belonging toluxurious contemporary lodging. In addition, MaffApartment was to have a clear and strong identityto provide a sense of uniqueness for its users.” -Queeste ArchitectenThe space was designed using a limited color andform palette consisting mainly of white, orangeand black and is equipped with plenty of naturallight. The rounded corners of the space add to itsfeeling of softness. 37
    • Domestic Transformer 344 sq. ft. By: Gary Chang Hong Kong, China 38
    • This living space, designed by the architect GaryChang, is 344 sq. ft. and is located in Hong Kong,China. Gary Chang designed this small apart-ment with a sliding wall system that can transformthis tiny domestic space into 24 different rooms.In a city, such as Hong Kong, where space is pre-cious and people are forced to live small, this so-lution is revolutionary. 39
    • Monolocale By: Andrea Lupacchini Rome, Italy 40
    • This living space, designed in 2002 by Andrea Lu-pacchini Architecten, is located in Rome, Italy. An-drea Lupacchini Architecten designed this smallstudio apartment to be fully equipped with a fullkitchen, a dining area, a living area, a bathroom,and a sleeping place as well as much room forstorage. The architects were tasteful in dividingup the open floor plan to accommodate all theseseparate spaces. The apartment is dynamic anduses the space wisely from the floor to the ceiling. 41
    • Finger Apartment 640 sq. ft. By: nooroof architects Manhattan, New York 42
    • This apartment, designed by noroof architects fora family of 4, is 640 sf. and is located in the LowerEast Side of Manhattan, New York. This narrow,family style, apartment hardly has enough spaceto accommodate for all the family’s needs, butwith their intelligent design solutions, one roomcan easily turn into two.“these features are critical space-savers that al-low them to live peacefully in the postage stamp-size apartment, but the inventive design is also areminder that livability isn’t just about organiza-tion and tidiness; it’s about the joy of interactingwith a space.” -Sarah Rich, Dwell Magazine 43
    • Yacht Design Photography by Nicolas Claris 44
    • The design of the interiors of yachts is definitelysomething to be inspired by when designing oth-er small spaces. When you walk onto a yacht itseems so spacious and makes so much sense.Why is this? When designing these homes for thewater, designers make sure to incorporate 3 basicprinciples; large windows, materials and storage.By having large windows, which provide naturallight, it takes your mind off or the interior space andeludes you to feel like there is more room. Manyyachts use materials that have a shine, such aswoods and stainless steel appliances. These ma-terials reflect the natural light and ignite the roomwith even more lighting. To accommodate for thelack of space, these boats always include furni-ture and wall units that offer storage solutions. 45
    • Winnebago Bus Design 46
    • Just like yachts, Winnebago buses are greatexamples of making the most of small spaces.Whether used for touring or as your permanenthome, these buses are designed to provide ev-erything a home can offer. With storage alwaysbeing a problem in small spaces, these buses useoverhead cabinets and furniture that also func-tions as storage to solve this problem. Some ofthese buses also have an expandable wall fea-ture that opens up the room when parked. Thissimple transformation increases the size of thespace immensely and retracts when on the go. 47
    • The Scarecrow“one room house” 48
    • This film, starring the comedian Buster Keaton,was releases in 1920. Although a very short film(about 19 minutes long) there is one scene thatis most memorable from this movie. It was thescene where the two actors, Buster Keaton andJoe Roberts, share a small house full of wackygadgets and multifunctional everyday items thatare reminiscent of a Rube Goldberg type of illus-tration. Buster Keaton’s clever way of thinking andinventiveness was definitely inspiration to manyof today’s multifunctional designs. When goingabout designing for an urban small space, thisscene will definitely influence my way of thinkingand remind me it’s not just about living in a spacebut it’s about interaction with the space as well. 49
    • Japanese Style Thinking Photograph by Private House Interior 50
    • Japanese style interiors have been slowly evolv-ing for centuries. One of the most important con-cepts of Japanese interior design is the idea ofa room being simple enough that it can becomeany room you want it to be. This is all made pos-sible by designing using a neutral color pallet andfunctional furnishings. The futon is a typical pieceof Japanese furniture. At some point in the day aroom with a futon can be a place to relax and en-tertain while at another point in the day this pieceof furniture may be used to take an afternoonnap. The same is for the very iconic Japanesescreen dividers. This product allows for the abilityto be flexible with a room. You can easily movethe screens and change the space entirely bycreating a whole new area within a room. Thereis a lot that can be learned from this extremelyold style of designing a space. Especially whenspace becomes more precious and we have tobe cautious about the ways we design; maybewe can take a personal lesson about “how lessreally can mean more.” 51
    • SmallProblems52
    • 53
    • After some research and case studies frompeople who live in small spaces I came torealize the main activities held in peoplesliving quarters, what problems they facedand what they wished they had more of. ! 54
    • Z Z ZThe most common use of apartmentspaces were for eating, sleeping,bathing, and relaxing. 55
    • The most common problems peoplehad with their small spaces dealt withventilation issues and airflow, lack ofentertaining space for people, heatcaused from appliances, storage ofclothing and privacy. Do Not Disturb 56
    • People wish they had better ventilation, more seating for guests, more storage options, more privacy and a quieter space.Do NotDisturb shhh 57 57
    • 6 WallThinking58
    • 59
    • Most of the times when small spaces aredesigned people don’t use the space to itsmaximum potential. The average apartmentuses the 4 or more walls for decoration andstorage. The floor is used for putting the furni-ture and rugs on, to divide up the space, andthe ceiling for the fixed lighting. Now thereare many apartments that have been creat-ed that are beautiful and comfortable spacesfrom designing this way, but with this rise ofpopulation into cities these apartments arenot using the space to it maximum potential. We need to do what I call “6 wall thinking” 60
    • By thinking beyond just giving the 4 wallsof a space the most function and delegat-ing functionality to the other two walls, thefloor and the ceiling, we are taking a step inthe right direction to achieving the maximumpotential of space use. 6 2 1 3 4 1-4. the main 4 walls 5 5. floor 6. ceiling 61
    • This room is a great example of awell designed room using 4 wallthinking. Here the ceiling is used asa wall to a provide lighting and thefloor is used at its most basic func-tion of a platform for furniture. v Photography by DC walls
    • These two design practices are great exam- ples of the ways to use your other two walls, the floor and the ceiling. On the left the ceil- ing’s main function is to provide lighting as well as a place to stow away your bed. On the right the floor is given another function as a storage option. Both these design dis- appear when not in use and help provide a more functional space to live in. By using 6 wall thinking when space is limited you can potentially create more options to better your living situation.s walls 63
    • FunctionalPractices 64
    • 65
    • Wall Partitions Using wall partitions as room dividers is a great way to divide up space within a persons living quarters. This use of dividers grew from the inspiration of traditional Japanese sliding screens. By using wall partitions systems, or room dividers, an open space can easily be transformed into two separate private spac- es. Although these walls are great for creat- ing multiple separate spaces they may also be helpful in covering up unpleasant parts of small space, such as an area with wash- ing machines or a cluttered bookshelf. Simply slide these walls over to hide them and uncover them when needed. The Sliding Door Company Photograph by Dudye The Sliding Door Company 66
    • Gary Chang’s “Domestic Transformer” is a great example of an innovativethinking using these wall partitions. He created a system that made a smallspace easily transform into 24 different rooms by just organizing these wallin different ways. This type of thinking may just be what small spaces in thefuture need to make the most of the space provided. 67
    • Terence Conran is an extremely talented and world renowned British designer. He is also known as a restaurateur and a major retailer. In 1956 he established the Conran Design Studio. Here he de- veloped a multidisciplinary group of designers which concentrated on the practices of exhibition, graphic, fur- niture and interior design. He soon developed the well-known chain of stores, Habitat. These stores set out to be much more than a furniture store. Conran states “It was design to be constantly changing, with new looks and ideas. However, classic cookware and furniture was the pre- dominant base of it all.” 68
    • After much success in the design industry, especially with interior design, Con-ran wrote many books having to do with residential home design. When rec-ognizing that many people, especially in urban areas, were opting in therelarge living spaces for smaller ones, Conran wrote many books about livingsmaller. One that was very informative was “Conran’s Living in Small Spaces”.In this book he goes over the benefits of living small, basic interior designprinciples and tackles the issues one would have of living in small spaces. Hedoes this by walking you through each tight living space and provides you withsimple solutions and techniques on how to make the most of your small space. 69
    • What makes thisspace well designed? 5 4 3 1 2 6 70
    • Large windows are a huge advantage in a small space. Not only1 does it fill your room with lots of natural light but it also increases your perception of space. Mirrors just like windows increases your perception of space and2 makes you believe there is more. This room uses mirrors ex- tremely well. By placing mirrors near a window they can be most effective in our perception of space as well as dispersing of the natural light. In small spaces privacy is important. By simply opening up these3 curtain dividers the room doubles in size. When closed you have 2 separate spaces where you can be alone if necessary. With this element you are providing options for yourself and giving yourself the ability to change the space if needed. By painting the ceiling a lighter color than the walls you are creat-4 ing the illusion of height. This gives a the room a grandeur feel as apposed to if the ceiling was a dark color, it would feel more cavernous. Wall and ceiling lights are excellent choices for light sources. By5 having this fixture hang from the ceiling it does not take up much space in the room. This fixture in particular is very useful because you can point the many lights in areas you would like to illuminate, giving you more control over the look and feel of the room. The fix- ture also defines the space. It is claiming that this area is an area for activity. It is very important to incorporate organic materials and plants6 throughout the space. It gives energy and life to a room, creating a more pleasant and natural feel. 71
    • Interviews72
    • 73
    • I constructed interviews with Architects and Interior Designers to find out how one can make the most of a small space, using different design practices. My interviews provided me with diverse responses, all which aided me to better understand different ways of going about this design process.74
    • Stacey Fishkin Creative Director at CDA Interior Designer Bio: Stacey Fishkin is a professional Interior Design- er and is the creative director at CDA (Creative Design Associates) in Manhattan, NY. She has had much ex- perience in the field of Interior Design and has been apart of many high end designs for mainly residential spaces.How can colors, textures and patterns effect our awareness of space? Colors and textures are very important; they break up space and create depth when there may not be any. Light colors make the room feel larger and darker colors will feel more cavernous depending on the space. A nice textured wall when you first walk in or in the back of the room gives a lot of depth and it almost creates an extra space.What techniques can you use to divide up a space? There are so many different ways to do this. You can use resin or glass walls which are great in a small space because they allow light to go through the wall so each room section does not feel enclosed. You can also do this with furniture. If you are creating some sort of studio space you can use a floor to ceiling book shelf to separate space or even wardrobes to create more storage.How can you make a room seem larger than it really is? Color and texture are really great ways to do this. Like I said before, light colors can definitely make a room feel larger than it is. Accent walls with wall covering (texture) or just a slighting darker shade a paint will give the illusion that there is more space. Also, if you could create these spaces with taller ceilings, that helps as well. Mirrors are also a great way to create the illusion of more space.Are there any basic principles I should follow when designing? I don’t necessarily think there are basic principles to follow. I think that if a design works, it works. If it’s functional and people like it then you succeeded.What is your design process? When I start designing a room, I find a room that has already been designed, a time period, a piece of artwork, anything that gives me a little inspiration and then I design the room based on that. So after I find my inspiration I just start looking at furniture and color and accessories to bring the room together based on my inspiration. 75
    • Sami Rintala Rintala Eggertsson Architects Architect Bio: Sami Rintala is a professional Architect from Norway. He has done many successful and beautiful designs that have been published in books and magazines. He is the Architect of the very well know design, BOXHOME.What is your design process? This is depending on the project, we are very little dogmatic about our strategies. Usually, in a good case, we can design the basic form and structure beforehand, and then all the details while we are building. This is giving good results and it is fun.What is most important to you when designing an environment that is so limited with space? To compensate the loss of size with other qualities, like functionality, materials, natural light, views = good architecture.How can you design a space to make the environments seem bigger than they really are?(materials,windows,textures?) One interesting test with Boxhome was to make the spaces dark instead of white, which is the usual strategy. When it is dark enough, the boundaries disappear and the room feels larger. Otherwise well formed ( fixed) furniture is highly important, how the little space suggests your body to move about and use the room. 76
    • Petra Wilhelmina Syracuse University Interior Designer Bio: Petra Wilhelmina is a senior Interior Design student at Syracuse University.How can you make the room seem larger than it really is? Large windows, mirrors, light colored walls, textures and patterns, and false windows are some ways of creating illusions that the room is larger than it really is. Placing mirrors near windows helps to open up the room.What are ways of dividing up spaces within a room? Ceiling soffits can help to give the room a more dynamic feel while also claiming a space. Rugs can be placed in certain areas to define a space. Changing of materials and colors can help ease you into another room. Different types of lighting throughout a room can differentiate spaces. Down lighting can add a horizontal feel to a room. Back lighting and floor lighting are also other ways of using lights.What are ways of spreading out natural light in a space? Use glossy surfaces on the counter tops and the flooring to reflect light around a room.Additional key information to remember: - Try and bring some of nature into the room and use organic forms when you can. - Remember ADA Codes - Always remember to consider the door swing when designing an interior. 77
    • Markie Melo Syracuse University Interior Designer Bio: Markie Melo is a senior Interior Design student at Syracuse University.How can colors, textures and patterns effect our awareness of space? Colors, textures, and patterns can be used as devices to highlight important areas or aspects of an interior environment, which can ultimately alter the perception of space. For example; color and textures can be used to delineate spaces, aid in way finding, highlight structural as- pects i.e. soffits, ceiling planes, flooring planes etc. Colors can be linked to human emotion and manipulated to affect the user. For example a colors wavelength affects its human perception such as red, which has the highest wave length excites and stimulates, where blue which as the lowest wavelength calms and soothes.What techniques can you use to divide up a space? Space can be divided in many ways; The most common successful dividers are the use of: Partition walls, changes in flooring or ceiling planes, material changes and transitions, lighting changes and transitions, and the use of furniture and spatial planning. There are other non- traditional devices used as well, such as using sound, such as retail environments often play different music to separate different departments.How can you make a room seem larger than it really is? Making a space seem larger than it is can be achieved through many different devices; some devices that aim to maximize efficiency of small spaces are: using verticality within a space, maximizing natural lighting and effectively using artificial lighting, using reflective surfaces, and specifying furniture and utilities which have multiple functions.What is your design process? Simply- research, analysis, ideation, sketching, client approval, proposals, revisions, final pro- posal, construction. 78
    • What are some Interior Design absolute Nos? Never design arbitrarily or without thought of the users. Always design for people first, think about the user at all times. Always consider the safety, emotions, and needs of the user. In terms of No’s” within materials and spatial layout, there aren’t really any, I think that if you de- sign with intent and thought of the user, that any choice can be supported. If you can back up a reason for why you chose to do something, then there is validity in any design choice.What ways can you spread light around a room with materials and such? Reflective materials can bounce light, especially if placed opposite from a source of light. Re- flective and light colors applied to specific planes, such as ceilings, walls, and floors can be effective in spreading lighting. Reflective materials do not mean mirrored specifically, but any- thing with a gloss, hard, or polished finished which refracts light around the space. There are also products that can better spread natural lighting throughout a room such as light shelves, which bounce light upwards to the ceiling. summary of interviews: - The most common response according to, creating the illusion of more space within a small room, was to mainly use lighter colors such as white, and to paint the ceiling a lighter color than the walls. Although this is the most common strat- egy Sami Rintala used a different strategy when designing BOXHOME. He tried to make this space dark because “When it is dark enough, the boundaries disappear and the room feels larger.” His design was successful and may be something I want to remember when I go about my design process. - Mirrors and large windows can have a strong impact on your perception of space. - When space is limited try to incorporate furnishings that have more than one func- tion to make the most of your space. - Remember to put yourself in the users shoes when designing. 79
    • Future Appliances /Technology80
    • 81
    • As more and more people are shifting to this urban lifestyle, there has been a constant shift in technol- ogy as well. This growth in technology has had a major impact on our home appliances, which have made it easier to live smaller. Look at the rather new televisions on the mar- ket. These slim powerhouses of entertainment are gaining more functions day by day, whether it be with more channels, video gaming, or internet activity, they are a great example of how design- ers are using new technology in home appliances while considering the want for more space.82
    • Appliances always come with a cord, and these cords always lead to problems. They are either in the way of our other ac- tivities, uneasy to look at, or there just are not given enough outlets. Design trend have shown that more and more appli- ances are going towards wireless power. Some companies are claiming this idea of wireless power is going to be almost everywhere in the home. Eventually you will be able to just set down your device, whether it is a cellular phone or a blender in your kitchen, and it will be given the power to function. This is made possible by coils that are imbedded into your home sur- faces. Your appliances recognize the power source and when placed on top of, your appliances will be able to function. This concept could have a large impact on small residential space because it allows you to be less restricted with how and where you use your appliances. With this technology you are not con- strained by the length of a cord.“We were amazed to see a panof water boiling on a simple coun-ter top, eliminating the need for astove. The possibilities for futuresmall space living and multi-usespaces are just incredible.” -Emily Ho, The Kitchn 83
    • Appliances are also becoming smarter. They are considerate of ourexperience when using them and the impacts they have on the envi-ronment as well as our wallets. The newest clothing washing machineson the market today have become much more advanced than a coupleyears ago. LG is one company who is leading the trend when it comesto washing our clothes. There machines are much more slim than pastwashing machines and can detect how much laundry you have loadedand determine the wash time for you. By having this technology youalways use the correct amount of water, and heat for drying in ac-cordance to the amount of laundry you have. This has a huge effecton the environment as well as our energy bills. These machines alsohave become much quieter over the years. Now you can do laundry athome and not be disturbed by the tumbling of clothing going throughthe cleaning process. In small spaces a laundry machine could reallydisrupt your home time due to the noise. With technology such as thisyou can enjoy your small spaces much more while you are simultane-ously getting your chores done. 84
    • On the trend of appliances becoming smarter we can look at howthis type of technology is effecting our kitchen appliances. Someappliances such as microwaves are being designed to incorporateinternet type of functions that guide you in the cooking process.You can now perform a search on the internet with an interfacehoused in an appliance. This application can instruct you how toprepare the dinner of your choice easily right there, no cook booksnecessary. This concept microwave has an An- droid imbedded interface which is connected to the internet. It has all the simple functions and options of a microwave and now more. By be- ing connected to the internet you can look up recipes on The Food Network, listen to pandora while your cooking, or even download applications which may make life easier in the kitchen. 85
    • Conclusion 86
    • The research I have performed hasgiven me much insight into why thisstatistic that started my inquiries, in2050, 74% of the world’s population ispredicted to live in an urban environ-ment, is the foreseen future. Not onlyam I aware of why this is happening,but I have studied what designers andarchitects have experimented with toaccommodate for a future where spaceis precious. By taking into consider-ation about what makes each designI have researched so special and ap-plying that to a product of some sortthat enhances the experience of livingsmall or creates much more from less,I will have the opportunity to designsomething that may better downsizedliving situations. 87
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    • ReferencesHo, Emily. "Kitchens of the Future: Tech and Trends at CES." The Kitchn. 11 Jan. 2010. Web. 19Nov. 2010. <http://www.thekitchn.com/thekitchn/news/kitchens-of-the-future-tech-and-trends-at-ces-105732>."How Technology Can Transform Cities - Newsweek." Newsweek - National News, World News,Business, Health, Technology, Entertainment, and More - Newsweek. Web. 20 Oct. 2010. <http://www.newsweek.com/2010/01/15/the-future-of-the-city.html>.Interior Sliding Doors, Glass Doors & Door Hardware Specialists. Web. 21 Nov. 2010. <http://www.specialtydoors.com/>.Iwatate, Marcia, and Geeta K. Mehta. Japan Living: Form and Function at the Cutting Edge. [S.l.]:[s.n.]. Print.Jacobs, Steven. The Wrong House: the Architecture of Alfred Hitchcock. Rotterdam: 010, 2007.Print.“Japanese Interior Decorating - A Simple, Sophisticated Style.” Interior Design It Yourself For Stun-ning and Practical Home Decorating. Web. 21 Nov. 2010. <http://www.interior-design-it-yourself.com/japanese-interior-decorating.html>.“Japanese Interior Design as Your Home Decor Style.” Home Decorating Reviews. Web. 21 Nov.2010. <http://www.home-decorating-reviews.com/japanese-style.html>.Leonard, Jennifer, and Bruce Mau. Massive Change. London:Phaidon, 2004. Print.“LG 11KG Washing Machine - IT’S THE NEXT BIG THING.” LG. Web. 21 Nov. 2010. <http://www.lg.com/uk/thenextbigthing/>.Mola, Francesc Zamora. New Small Spaces: Good Ideas. New York, NY: Collins Design, 2008.Print.“Noroof Architects › Finger Apartment.” Noroof Architects. Web. 21 Nov. 2010. <http://noroof.net/work/projects/finger-apartment>.Rich, Sarah. “A Narrow Victory.” Dwell - At Home in the Modern World. Web. 21 Nov. 2010. <http://www.dwell.com/articles/a-narrow-victory.html>.Schlein, Lisa, Joe De Capua, and Sven Kruger. “For Humanity’s Sake, Developing World MustPrepare for Soaring Urbanisation.” City Mayors: Mayors Running the World’s Cities. UN PopulationFund. Web. 20 Oct. 2010. <http://www.citymayors.com/society/urban-population.html>. 89
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