16 Days 2013: Presentation based on UN Study, December 6, 2013
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    16 Days 2013: Presentation based on UN Study, December 6, 2013 16 Days 2013: Presentation based on UN Study, December 6, 2013 Presentation Transcript

    • Why do some men use violence against women and how can we prevent it? Notes from the Summary of a Study
    • Objectives 1. 2. 3. 4. To better understand men’s use of different forms of VAW (specifically, intimate partner violence and non-partner rape) in the AsiaPacific; To assess men’s own experience of violence as well as their perpetration of violence against other men and how it relates to VAW; To identify factors associated with men’s perpetration of VAW; To promote evidence-based policies and programmes to prevents VAW.
    • Findings  Prevalence and Patterns of Intimate Partner Violence  Prevalence and patterns of non-partner and partner rape  The diversity of men’s lives: gender practices, experiences of violence and adversity  Factors associated with violence prevention.
    • Prevalence and Patterns of Intimate Partner Violence  Men’s use of violence against intimate female partners was pervasive but prevalence varied across sites.  Patterns of intimate partner violence varied across sites.
    • Prevalence and patterns of nonpartner and partner rape    Rape was pervasive but prevalence varied. Rape of intimate partner was more common than rape of a non-partner in most sites. Rape perpetration started early in life. – 49% of men who reported having raped, had done so for the first time as a teenager.    A sense of sexual entitlement the most common motivation. Majority faced no legal consequences. To a much smaller extend, some men also raped other men. – Most of these had also raped a female non-partner. – The greatest overlap was between male rape and gang rape against women.
    • The diversity of men’s lives
    • The diversity of men’s lives Not all men used violence.  Men and women supported gender equality in the abstract but less in practice.  Men’s experiences of abuse during childhood were common and had serious consequences.  Some men also experienced rape by other men.  A large proportion of men suffered from workrelated stress, depression and suicidal tendencies. 
    • Men’s experiences of childhood abuse “Men’s experiences of abuse were associated with depression, low life satisfaction, poor health, gang membership, being involved in fights with weapons, alcohol and drug abuse, use of transactional sex and violence perpetration.” Page 10 of the Executive Summary  A large proportion of men suffered from workrelated stress, depression and suicidal tendencies.
    • Factors associated with violence   A complex interplay, just stopping one factor will not end VAW. With IPV, most common factors: – Frequent quarrelling, several sexual partners, transactional sex, depression; – At least one kind of childhood abuse, with neglect, sexual abuse and witnessing abuse of the mother being most common. – Low level of education, current experiences of food insecurity, alcohol abuse, gender inequitable attitudes and controlling behaviour.
    • Factors (2)  Rape was associated with more sexual partners, transactional sex, using physical violence against female partners, victimization and participation in violence outside the home.  Rape of a man strongly associated with more sexual partners, victimization and participation in violence outside the home.  Factors vary by location.
    • “Both partner violence and non-partner rape were found to be fundamentally related to unequal gender norms, power inequalities and dominant ideas of manhood that support violence and control over women… Intimate partner violence is more strongly associated with gender inequality in the home and experiences of child abuse while non-partner rape is more strongly correlated with notions of manhood that promote heterosexual dominance and participation in violence outside the home.” Page 14 of the Executive Summary
    • From the study to the films, some questions to mull over  How do unequal gendered norms make violence more likely? – In marriage, in the use of spaces within the home and outside.  With gendered spaces and gender segregation, how do you learn to be male or female, and how does that predispose a person towards violence (or not)?  How is power expressed/communicated?  What about participation in violence outside the home?
    • About this Forum  We want to talk about masculinities, men, gender, violence.  The UN Study is a point of departure and the films are a hook.  The point of the panels are neither the study nor the films themselves but some of the larger questions that both raise about gender, power and violence in society.