assessing collaboration: The effect of pedagogical alignment and shared learning outcomes for information literacy instruc...
it’s fun, but is it effective? <ul><li>Does aligning our pedagogy actually help students learn and use an inquiry approach...
how we got started <ul><li>Tier I Writing and Library Instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Outcomes revision </li></ul><ul><li>Li...
what is inquiry-based learning?
diving in versus surf(ace)ing a national perspective <ul><li>T h e idea embodied in this report would turn the prevailing ...
diving in versus surf(ace)ing an institutional perspective <ul><li>R a ther than teaching the results of others’ investiga...
diving in versus surf(ace)ing a disciplinary perspective <ul><li>[ T he] lack of clarity about the relationship between th...
Tier I research outcomes: <ul><li>Demonstrate the ability to locate, critically evaluate, and employ a variety of sources ...
why inquiry in the library? <ul><li>“I already wrote my paper – I just need to find three scholarly sources to back up wha...
why inquiry in the library? <ul><li>“ Librarians can prove to be essential allies for writing teachers insofar as they mig...
why inquiry in the library? <ul><li>Research is an integral component of the recursive writing process </li></ul><ul><li>M...
fusing best practice: <ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Inquiry-based pedagogy </li></ul><ul><li>Outcome driven </li...
methodology <ul><li>Semester-long project </li></ul><ul><li>Taking place within normal framework of class/library visit </...
selection and population <ul><li>Instructors who use inquiry-based learning pedagogy in their class  </li></ul><ul><li>Aim...
quantitative data <ul><li>Pre and post class student surveys: </li></ul><ul><li>inquiry approach to research  </li></ul><u...
<ul><li>Class worksheet </li></ul><ul><li>Reflective paper </li></ul><ul><li>SIRS forms </li></ul><ul><li>Student papers <...
the library session: create new  knowledge response Seek out new information,  analyze, evaluate, and plan
the rubric <ul><li>Applied to student papers/projects </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluating inquiry through the standard of integra...
When you think about doing research for an assignment, it’s  primarily  in what context? Other: “To find facts for a repor...
class worksheets <ul><li>How did you find this information? </li></ul><ul><li>How did you decide that it was (requested ty...
 
 
 
minute papers <ul><li>How To’s, navigating physical and online space, citations </li></ul><ul><li>“ How to redefine a “sea...
minute papers <ul><li>How To’s, navigating physical and online space, citations </li></ul><ul><li>“ How I am going to writ...
future research <ul><li>Using the rubric, compare work from classes that do not visit the library or do not use inquiry-ba...
works cited <ul><li>The Boyer Commission on Educating Undergraduates in the Research University. Reinventing Undergraduate...
questions & contact info Sara D. Miller   Assistant Library Instruction Coordinator 100 Library, E-119A Michigan State Uni...
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Assessing collaboration

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Assessing collaboration: The effect of pedagogical alignment and shared learning outcomes for information literacy instruction in first year writing classes

Presentation given at LILAC (Librarian's Information Literacy Annual Conference) 2010 in Limerick, Ireland

Presenters: Sara D. Miller, Assistant Library Instruction Coordinator, and Nancy DeJoy, Director of First Year Writing, Michigan State University

Published in: Education
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  • Collaboration specifically from the viewpoint of those stressing inquiry-based learning. A project currently in progress. Collaboration with librarians and instructors of Tier I Writing (freshman comp).
  • MSU background How many Tier I sections 337, students – 66-6700 per year Developed modules to meet more basic requirements of program, infolit competencies - first two outcomes This study focuses on the next step – the higher level thinking or integration of sources, which encompasses basic concepts like evaluation and selection. Requires a thorough understanding of the material and its appropriate use.
  • Selected two which this study address The original collaborations met the first two outcomes, This project addresses the next step – the inquiry outcome. The alignment of pedagogy was designed to meet these two outcomes – the first more practical, the second more to do with the nature of research.
  • In other words, it’s not just about finding stuff. Finding stuff is important, but these assumptions are what the students are actually supposed to be learning according to our outcomes. The practical search skills and higher thinking about research need to go hand in hand.
  • Established best practices: Much research has already been done about the benefits of librarian/instructor collaboration Inquiry-based pedagogy has been recommended since the Boyer Report in 1998 Learning outcomes have been stressed since then as well, stretching back to assessment movement in higher ed. -Outcomes help us see the big picture, tying in to university wide goals and assessment.
  • Normal instruction sessions – just collecting more data. This is only possible through more librarian involvement in the class – more than just getting the syllabus/assignment. This is turning out to not really be that intrusive.
  • Explain SIRS forms – question: “Have your research practices changed as a result of this class, and if so, how?” Student papers are meat of the study
  • Models the inquiry process. -Begin with top arrow. Response: Begin with an article or video for them to respond to. What’s it about? -Seek out new info: Break into groups, find more information on questions, fill out worksheets about information. -Create new knowledge: Create list of evaluative criteria, show new ways of searching, come up with new inquiry.
  • Have students practically incorporated the concepts of inquiry into their work? How integrated are the sources into the paper? More than just choosing appropriate sources, are the students interacting with the sources to respond, analyze, and create new knowledge?
  • -Has the students’ attitude toward research changed any? Has it moved from a “reporting’ to an “inquiry” mindset? Having some trouble with responses – the post-class is a much smaller sample. As of these charts, the number of pre-class responses was 89 and post class was 19. Largest category is still “finding facts for a report,” which does not reflect higher inquiry skills. This category decreased post-class, both in favor of an inquiry related category and a practical one. Post-class, one inquiry category increased: helping you to find a focus. Practical – meeting requirements – could have been due to their having the assignment, or the format of class.?
  • look on handout for questions First two questions are practical and reflect first shared outcome Third, fourth, and fifth questions attempt to guide students into (or model) an inquiry-based approach to the sources
  • Diversity of responses is promising? Most students still said background info or side Not sure if there is a “good” answer for this one
  • Roughly 85-90% of answers were “how to’s” including using the library online resources, finding a book, getting around the library The navigation and how tos were included in the class, but they were a very small part. Most of these represent task orientation. – the quotes listed are more conceptual. This shows me that setting the outcomes conceptually and focusing mainly on inquiry still allowed time for the mechanics, or that using an inquiry perspective did not eliminate practicality.
  • Roughly 85-90% of answers were “how to’s” including using the library online resources, finding a book, getting around the library These answers mostly indicate a task-oriented way of thinking, with the exception of the quotations. How To’s – mostly more sources that we did not have time for in the class, but indicated that students saw the sources as valuable Inquiry: Students are still talking about the “best way” to do research, but are getting to the concept of what is relevant to your writing, which is key to inquiry. This shows me that students are some students are beginning to think about, and possibly struggle with, the concepts of inquiry.
  • Can this be accomplished in just one semester? Do we see any improvement?
  • Assessing collaboration

    1. 1. assessing collaboration: The effect of pedagogical alignment and shared learning outcomes for information literacy instruction in first year writing classes
    2. 2. it’s fun, but is it effective? <ul><li>Does aligning our pedagogy actually help students learn and use an inquiry approach? </li></ul><ul><li>Does this collaboration have an impact on the achievement of Tier I Writing’s research outcomes? </li></ul>
    3. 3. how we got started <ul><li>Tier I Writing and Library Instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Outcomes revision </li></ul><ul><li>Lilly Fellows Program </li></ul>
    4. 4. what is inquiry-based learning?
    5. 5. diving in versus surf(ace)ing a national perspective <ul><li>T h e idea embodied in this report would turn the prevailing culture of receivers into a culture of inquirers, a culture in which faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates share an adventure of discovery. The first year university experience needs to provide new stimulation for intellectual growth and a firm grounding in inquiry-based learning (1998, The Boyer Commission). </li></ul>
    6. 6. diving in versus surf(ace)ing an institutional perspective <ul><li>R a ther than teaching the results of others’ investigations, which students learn passively, instructors assist students in mastering and learning through the process of active investigation itself. </li></ul><ul><li>(2004. Lee et. al, 9) </li></ul>
    7. 7. diving in versus surf(ace)ing a disciplinary perspective <ul><li>[ T he] lack of clarity about the relationship between the products of student writing and the field still pervades too much of our work. The resulting silences position students —especially our first-year writing students—too strongly as consumers, too clearly as adapting to, rather than participating in and contributing to, composition studies. </li></ul><ul><li>(2004. DeJoy, 1) </li></ul>
    8. 8. Tier I research outcomes: <ul><li>Demonstrate the ability to locate, critically evaluate, and employ a variety of sources for a range of purposes </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate an understanding of research as epistemic and recursive processes that arise from and respond back to various communities </li></ul>
    9. 9. why inquiry in the library? <ul><li>“I already wrote my paper – I just need to find three scholarly sources to back up what I already said.” </li></ul>
    10. 10. why inquiry in the library? <ul><li>“ Librarians can prove to be essential allies for writing teachers insofar as they might reinforce several key underlying assumptions: that knowledge is dialogic, not just informational; that knowledge springs from inquiry motivated by genuine problems and cognitive dissonance, and that knowledge grows through a process of substantive revision.” </li></ul><ul><li>( 2004. Norgaard, 222 ) </li></ul>
    11. 11. why inquiry in the library? <ul><li>Research is an integral component of the recursive writing process </li></ul><ul><li>Models scholarly inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes critical thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Integrates seamlessly with course and program objectives </li></ul>
    12. 12. fusing best practice: <ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Inquiry-based pedagogy </li></ul><ul><li>Outcome driven </li></ul>
    13. 13. methodology <ul><li>Semester-long project </li></ul><ul><li>Taking place within normal framework of class/library visit </li></ul><ul><li>Data collected throughout semester </li></ul>
    14. 14. selection and population <ul><li>Instructors who use inquiry-based learning pedagogy in their class </li></ul><ul><li>Aimed for: ten sections, across eight Tier I Writing themes </li></ul><ul><li>Actual: nine sections, across five themes, with seven instructors </li></ul>
    15. 15. quantitative data <ul><li>Pre and post class student surveys: </li></ul><ul><li>inquiry approach to research </li></ul><ul><li>confidence level </li></ul><ul><li>perceived skill level </li></ul><ul><li>perception of the necessity of library instruction </li></ul><ul><li>perception of the necessity of library resources  </li></ul><ul><li>perceived relevance of the session </li></ul><ul><li>transfer of learning </li></ul>
    16. 16. <ul><li>Class worksheet </li></ul><ul><li>Reflective paper </li></ul><ul><li>SIRS forms </li></ul><ul><li>Student papers </li></ul>qualitative data
    17. 17. the library session: create new knowledge response Seek out new information, analyze, evaluate, and plan
    18. 18. the rubric <ul><li>Applied to student papers/projects </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluating inquiry through the standard of integration </li></ul>
    19. 19. When you think about doing research for an assignment, it’s primarily in what context? Other: “To find facts for a report to back up my ideas and make them stronger.”
    20. 20. class worksheets <ul><li>How did you find this information? </li></ul><ul><li>How did you decide that it was (requested type of) information? Where did the information come from? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the material’s purpose? Why was it written? </li></ul><ul><li>Find some text in the source that might help you refine or change your search in some way. How might your search change, and what would you search for next after reading this material? </li></ul><ul><li>Why would the type of writing in this material be important to the conversation about (class topic or issue)? </li></ul>
    21. 24. minute papers <ul><li>How To’s, navigating physical and online space, citations </li></ul><ul><li>“ How to redefine a “search.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ How to start research on a topic in different ways.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Evaluati(ve) criteria, and how to tell if something is a good source or not.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Not all information is relevant and sometimes it leads you the wrong way.” </li></ul>1. What was the most important thing you learned today?
    22. 25. minute papers <ul><li>How To’s, navigating physical and online space, citations </li></ul><ul><li>“ How I am going to write this paper.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Applying research to ideas and putting it in writing.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ The best way to research and how to tell what is important and relevant to what you are researching and writing about.” </li></ul><ul><li>Finding topic-specific information </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation – how to know if something is “legit” </li></ul><ul><li>“ How to pick a topic and break it down into things to research.” </li></ul>2. What would you still like to know more about?
    23. 26. future research <ul><li>Using the rubric, compare work from classes that do not visit the library or do not use inquiry-based pedagogy </li></ul><ul><li>How long does it take students to adopt an inquiry process in regards to research? Do they ever? </li></ul><ul><li>Is attitude toward research and/or libraries affected by adopting an inquiry process? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ I would love to learn how to avoid writing research papers for the rest of my life and still get a degree in something like law.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Still would like to know where I can pay people to write papers for me.” </li></ul></ul>
    24. 27. works cited <ul><li>The Boyer Commission on Educating Undergraduates in the Research University. Reinventing Undergraduate Education: A Blueprint for America’s Research Universities: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, 1998 </li></ul><ul><li>DeJoy, Nancy C. Process This : Undergraduate Writing in Composition Studies. Utah State University Press, 2004. </li></ul><ul><li>Lee, Virginia, et al. &quot;What Is Inquiry-Guided Learning?&quot; Teaching and Learning through Inquiry: A Guidebook for Institutions and Instructors. Ed. Lee, Virginia. Sterling, Virginia: Stylus Publishing, 2004. 3-16 </li></ul><ul><li>Norgaard, Rolf. &quot;Writing Information Literacy in the Classroom: Pedagogical Enactments and Implications.&quot; Reference & User Services Quarterly 43 3 (2004): 220-6. </li></ul>
    25. 28. questions & contact info Sara D. Miller Assistant Library Instruction Coordinator 100 Library, E-119A Michigan State University East Lansing, Michigan, USA 48824 [email_address] PH: 517.884.0835 Nancy DeJoy Director, First Year Writing 235 Bessey Hall Michigan State University East Lansing, Michigan, USA 48824 [email_address] PH: 517.432.4031

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