Interviewer and trainer roleplay guides

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Interviewer and trainer roleplay guides

  1. 1. INTERVIEWER’S ROLE PLAY GUIDEThis guide presents some situations you are likely to encounter as an interviewer ofmaternal deaths. You will practice handling these situations during your training. Thiswill prepare you in case one of the situations occurs during a real interview.You will play different roles, including the interviewer and the respondent, during thetraining exercise. This will help you better understand respondents’ concerns andactions and will help you learn to handle these situations. Work closely with yourfellow trainees now and later. They can help you conduct successful interviews.Situation 1—a crowd of interested observers gathers aboutYou go to a household where you were told that a woman died. Several people arestanding about in front of the house. You introduce yourself and your reason forbeing there, and ask to speak with the person or persons who know the most aboutthe circumstances of the woman’s death. The woman’s sister says she knows aboutthe illness and invites you into the house. Several people follow. The sister answerssome questions, but others in the room also answer some questions. Some of theirresponses contradict each other, and they have difficulty deciding who is correct.Situation 2—the best respondent is not available at the time of the initial visitYou go to a household where a woman died. You ask to speak to the person orpersons who know the most about the circumstances of the death. Depending on thesituation, this may be the woman’s mother, her sister, her husband or someone elsewho was with her during her illness or when she died. You are told that the bestrespondent is the woman’s mother but that she is not home.Situation 3—the family denies a death occurredYou go to a household where you were informed there was a maternal death. Youknock on the door--a man opens it. You explain why you have come to the house.The man responds that you must have the wrong house. He says that no womanfrom this household has ever died. He seems tense, and politely asks you to leave.Situation 4—a second respondent is needed to obtain complete informationYou are interviewing the sister-in-law of a woman who died in hospital. The woman’shusband was sick during her illness so the sister-in-law cared for her. She answersquestions about the woman’s symptoms without difficulty, but has trouble withquestions on the timing of some events. She explains that she did not go to thehospital with her sister-in-law. She is not sure if she went to other health facilitiesbefore going to the hospital, nor how long she was in the hospital before she died.Situation 5—a second respondent who lives far away is neededYou introduce yourself at a household where a woman died, and ask to speak withthe person or persons who know the most about the circumstances of the woman’sdeath. The woman’s husband tells you that he took her to the hospital when shebecame very ill and you begin the interview. He easily answers several questions,but has difficulty describing the early part of his wife’s illness and tells you that shewas at her parents’ house when the illness started. The parents live in a differentvillage about one hour’s travel away.Interviewer’s role play guide page 1
  2. 2. Situation 6—the respondent is actively mourning the deathYou are interviewing a man about the death of his wife. The woman died threemonths before the interview. The interview has been going well, with the husbandremembering symptoms and events with little trouble. As you ask questions aboutthe time closer to death, the husband slows in his responses and begins to cry. Hetries to control himself but starts to cry harder. Situation 7—the respondent is uncertain of many answersYou are interviewing a woman about her daughter-in-law’s death. She answersseveral questions with little hesitation, but then has trouble with a question. Sheanswers “Yes,” then changes her answer to “No,” then pauses and says “I think so.”Situation 8—the respondent does not seem to be answering the questions openlyYou go to a household where you were told that a woman died. You identify thewoman’s mother-in-law as the best respondent about the labor and her father-in-lawas the best respondent about the journey to the hospital and you begin the interview.The respondents seem to have trouble answering some of the questions and oftenglance at each other as if they are waiting for the other to answer. Also, some of theirresponses contradict each other. For example, when asked about careseeking, themother-in-law says that the first thing the family did when they noticed the womanwas ill was to call a dai to the house. But the father-in-law disagreed and said thatthe first thing they did was to seek a taxi to take the woman to the hospital.Interviewer’s role play guide page 2
  3. 3. TRAINER’S ROLE PLAY GUIDEThis trainer’s guide accompanies the interviewer’s role play guide. The situationspresented are the same as those in the interviewer’s guide. In addition, this guideprovides more information about how to handle the situations. You may find thishelpful in training the interviewers and their supervisors.You should first discuss a problem situation with the interviewers and supervisors.Discuss why and when the situation might arise, and possible ways to deal with theproblem. Let the interviewers ask questions and discuss the situation amongthemselves and the supervisors. Then conduct the role play for that situation.Assign different interviewers and supervisors to act out each situation. You can dothis by writing each role, such as "interviewer,” “the woman’s mother," "the woman’ssister" or “supervisor” on a separate card and handing one to each person who willact a part in that role play. The entire group should observe each role play. As muchas possible, interviewers should decide how to handle the situations by themselves.This will give them confidence in similar situations in the field. After acting out asituation unassisted, the group should comment on what they observed. Use yourown experience and this guide to provide help when needed. Try not to tell theinterviewers the right thing to do. Rather, give hints or ask questions that will helpthem get back on the right path. Then let them find their way.Also assign the supervisors to critique and provide feedback to the interviewers. Thiswill provide the practice they need for their supervisory role. Your job at this point isto observe the role plays and the interaction of the interviewers and supervisors.Provide feedback to both, including how they might improve the supervisoryexperience. Useful supervision does not focus on criticism. It provides constructivefeedback. You can demonstrate this through your own supervisory methods.Instructions to the interviewersThis guide presents some situations you are likely to encounter as an interviewer ofmaternal deaths. We will practice handling these situations during your training. Thiswill prepare you in case one of the situations occurs during a real interview.You will play different roles, including the interviewer and the respondent, during thetraining exercise. This will help you better understand respondents’ concerns andactions and will help you learn to handle these situations. Work closely with yourfellow trainees now and later. They can help you conduct successful interviews.Situation 1—a crowd of interested observers gathers aboutYou go to a household where you were told that a woman died. Several people arestanding about in front of the house. You introduce yourself and your reason forbeing there, and ask to speak with the person or persons who know the most aboutthe circumstances of the woman’s death. The woman’s sister says she knows aboutthe illness and invites you into the house. Several people follow. The sister answerssome questions, but others in the room also answer some questions. Some of theirresponses contradict each other, and they have difficulty deciding who is correct.Trainer’s role play guide page 1
  4. 4. Trainer’s and supervisor’s guide to situation 1Crowd control at the interview location can be difficult for the interviewer to manage.The project may decide to send an additional person with the interviewer team toassist with this sort of situation. The interviewer’s task is to identify the mainrespondent (or respondents, if different persons know about different phases of thewoman’s illness) and to get the answers to the MAPEDI questions from thesepersons. This is easiest if the main respondents are the only persons present at theinterview. Accomplishing this must be done sensitively and cannot be forced if therespondent(s) want other persons there. Questions should be directed to theappropriate respondent (the one who knows the most about the illness phase beingdiscussed), and answers sought from her or him. If other persons in the room givecontradictory responses, the main respondent’s answer should be sought andrecorded. If the main respondent clearly does not know the answer to a question,then the response “don’t know” should be recorded in the MAPEDI format.Situation 2—the best respondent is not available at the time of the initial visitYou go to a household where a woman died. You ask to speak to the person orpersons who know the most about the circumstances of the death. Depending on thesituation, this may be the woman’s mother, her sister, her husband or someone elsewho was with her during her illness or when she died. You are told that the bestrespondent is the woman’s mother but that she is not home.Trainer’s and supervisor’s guide to situation 2Interviewers may encounter this situation frequently. When the best respondent isnot at home, the interviewer should attempt to make an appointment to return whenthis person will be available. If the family member who greeted the interviewer at thedoor cannot make the appointment, the interviewer should ask when to return to seethe respondent. Acting out this situation in a role play will reinforce these lessons.Situation 3—the family denies a death occurredYou go to a household where you were informed there was a maternal death. Youknock on the door--a man opens it. You explain why you have come to the house.The man responds that you must have the wrong house. He says that no womanfrom this household has ever died. He seems tense, and politely asks you to leave.Trainer’s and supervisor’s guide to situation 31) The interviewer may indeed have the wrong address, 2) the family with the deathmay have moved, or 3) the family may have decided they don’t want to beinterviewed. Addresses in some areas are inaccurate, so the interviewer should tryto confirm whether s/he is in the right place. If it appears s/he is at the right address,it is best to not confront the person. The interviewer should thank them and leave. Ablock leader or other community organization may be able to help the projectunderstand the problem and obtain the interview.Situation 4—a second respondent is needed to obtain complete informationYou are interviewing the sister-in-law of a woman who died in hospital. The woman’shusband was sick during her illness so the sister-in-law cared for her. She answersTrainer’s role play guide page 2
  5. 5. questions about the woman’s symptoms without difficulty, but has trouble withquestions on the timing of some events. She explains that she did not go to thehospital with her sister-in-law. She is not sure if she went to other health facilitiesbefore going to the hospital, nor how long she was in the hospital before she died.Trainer’s and supervisor’s guide to situation 4Respondents should be asked only about events that they may know about. Theinterviewer should ask if another person accompanied the woman on her way to thehospital or during the time she was in the hospital. If so, this person should beinterviewed about this time. If not, then it is better to not ask about this time.Situation 5—a second respondent who lives far away is neededYou introduce yourself at a household where a woman died, and ask to speak withthe person or persons who know the most about the circumstances of the woman’sdeath. The woman’s husband tells you that he took her to the hospital when shebecame very ill and you begin the interview. He easily answers several questions,but has difficulty describing the early part of his wife’s illness and tells you that shewas at her parents’ house when the illness started. The parents live in a differentvillage about one hour’s travel away.Trainer’s and supervisor’s guide to situation 5This is a variant of situation 3. There definitely are two main respondents (each waspresent for a different part of the woman’s illness), but one lives some distanceaway. The interviewer should attempt to question each respondent about the phaseof the woman’s illness that s/he witnessed. In the situation described, it wouldprobably be best for the interviewer to first visit the woman’s parents to learn aboutthe early part of her illness, and to next interview the husband about the latter part ofthe illness. If possible to arrange to bring them together, it would likely be moreefficient to interview the parents and husband together.Situation 6—the respondent is actively mourning the deathYou are interviewing a man about the death of his wife. The woman died threemonths before the interview. The interview has been going well, with the husbandremembering symptoms and events with little trouble. As you ask questions aboutthe time closer to death, the husband slows in his responses and begins to cry. Hetries to control himself but starts to cry harder.Trainer’s and supervisor’s guide to situation 6Many respondents still may be in mourning at the time of the interview. Interviewersneed to be sensitive to respondent’s feelings and concerns. They shouldacknowledge the painful situation before the interview begins. This can be done byexpressing empathy about the woman’s death. It may also help respondents to knowthat the health program and community plan to use the MAPEDI information toimprove care for other women. Interviewers should pause during an interview if arespondent cries or has great difficulty answering questions. S/he can be offered atissue for tears, and the interviewer should acknowledge how difficult it is to answerthe questions. She should give the respondent time to regain his or her composure,and ask if she can continue the interview at this time. If the respondent chooses notTrainer’s role play guide page 3
  6. 6. to continue, the interviewer should attempt to reschedule the interview.Situation 7—the respondent is uncertain of many answersYou are interviewing a woman about her daughter-in-law’s death. She answersseveral questions with little hesitation, but then has trouble with a question. Sheanswers “Yes,” then changes her answer to “No,” then pauses and says “I think so.”Trainer’s and supervisor’s guide to situation 7Many questions in the MAPEDI format allow a “don’t know” response. If therespondent is not sure of her answer, it is best to record the response as “don’tknow.” The respondent may not understand a question, so the interviewer shouldrepeat it more slowly. S/he may also re-phrase the question if alternate terms areprovided with the question. If a respondent answers “don’t know” to more than a fewquestions, this should raise the possibility that s/he is not the best respondent for thisdeath (or a particular phase of the illness, if there are different respondents for otherphases of the illness.) The interviewer should discuss such cases with her or hissupervisor and decide whether to seek out a different respondent.Situation 8—the respondent does not seem to be answering the questions openlyYou go to a household where you were told that a woman died. You identify thewoman’s mother-in-law as the best respondent about the labor and her father-in-lawas the best respondent about the journey to the hospital and you begin the interview.The respondents seem to have trouble answering some of the questions and oftenglance at each other as if they are waiting for the other to answer. Also, some of theirresponses contradict each other. For example, when asked about careseeking, themother-in-law says that the first thing the family did when they noticed the womanwas ill was to call a dai to the house. But the father-in-law disagreed and said thatthe first thing they did was to seek a taxi to take the woman to the hospital.Trainer’s and supervisor’s guide to situation 8Respondents may have hidden motives for their replies to the MAPEDI questions,and this may compromise the accuracy of the information they provide. They mayfeel guilty that they did not provide proper care for a woman and so contributed toher death. They may also fear loss of compensation for the death if it is determinedthat they did not do their part to seek needed care for the woman. Family issues mayalso be involved. For example, the woman’s family (her parents, brothers andsisters) may blame the in-laws for not providing proper care for her, and this maycause the in-laws to be wary about the answers they give. Whatever the reason, ifthe interviewer suspects that the respondent(s) are not being fully open in theirreplies, s/he should discuss this with her supervisor. It may be possible to addressthe respondents’ concerns and hence their reluctance to answer openly. If not, thenit may be necessary to seek other respondents to complete the interview. Suchsituations may require the supervisor to visit the family to make this determination.Trainer’s role play guide page 4

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