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A Student Affairs Career Resource

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A career resource guide for Student Affairs professionals.

A career resource guide for Student Affairs professionals.

Published in: Design, Career, Business

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  • 1. Student Affairs Career Resource: A Tool to Promote Student Learning By: P. Max QuinnUse  the  Career  Planning  Process  diagram  to  help    students  navigate  campus  resources.    By  using  this  diagram  in  coordination  with  the  student  development  theories  below,  you  will  be    best  equipped  to  handle  the  growing  needs  and  concerns  that  college  students  face  while  in  your  care.      Student  Development  Theories:    Seven  Vectors  of  Student  Development   1. Developing  Competence   2. Managing  Emotions   3. Moving  through  autonomy,  towards     Interdependence   4. Developing  Mature  Interpersonal     Relationships   5. Establishing  Identity   6. Developing  Purpose   7. Developing  Integrity    Transitioning  Theory  -­‐  The  4  S’s  How  the  person  perceives  the  experience  of  the  transition  determines  how  the  transition  will  affect  them.     Three  variables  of  adaption  to  transition:  Individual’s  perception  of  the  transition,  characteristics  of  pre  and  post  transition   environment,  &  characteristics  of  the  individual  experiencing  the  transition.               PERCEPTION   — Situation  -­‐  Triggers               Type  -­‐  Anticipated,  Unanticipated,  Non-­‐events   — Self  -­‐  What  the  individual  brings  to  the  transition         Context  -­‐  Relationship  to  the  transition   — Support  -­‐  Family,  friends,  institutions  a  part  of         Impact  -­‐  How  it  affects  daily  life   — Strategies  -­‐  Coping,  ability  and  liabilities            Challenge  &  Support   Finding  a  balance  of  challenge  and  support.  Too  much  support  with  too  little  challenge  creates  a  comfortable  environment   for  the  student,  where  little  development  is  possible.  However,  too  little  support  with  too  much  challenge  makes   development  an  impossible  and  negative  experience.  Create  dissonance  so  that  the  student  can  be  challenged  to  grow.   Support  them,  but  don’t  give  them  answers.    Cognitive  Development  Describes  students’  thinking  about  the  nature  of  knowledge,  truth,  values,  and  responsibilities  towards  self  and  others.*  • Stage  1-­‐  Dualism  (Black  or  White)   o Look  to  an  authority  figure  to  tell  them  what  to  believe.  /  Everything  is  right  or  wrong;  black  or  white.  • Stage  2  –  Multiplicity   o Believe  that  everyone  has  their  own  opinion  and  there  is  no  right  answer  • Stage  3  –  Relativism   o Believes  that  there  is  some  grey  area.  /  Accept  the  best  answer  that  they  can  find.  • Stage  4  –  Commitment  -­‐  Have  analyzed  the  evidence.  Committed  to  their  opinion.    Experiential  Learning  Learning  style:     § Habitual  way  of  responding  to  a  learning  environment.   § Offered  detailed  descriptions  of  each  of  the  styles.    Influences:   § Heredity   § Life  experiences   § Demands  of  immediate  environment  Styles  are  not  viewed  as  fixed  traits  but  as  current  states  of  mind.      
  • 2. Informational  summary:      This  student  affairs  career  resource  tool  has  been  created  to  help  professional’s  navigate  student  needs  and  expectations.                  If  college  and  universities  are  to  provide  students  with  the  knowledge  and  resources  to  be  successful  post-­‐graduation,  we  as  administrators  must  assist  in  developing  the  whole  student.  Apart  of  each  student’s  goals  involves  their  career  path.  This  tool  should  be  useful  to  student  affairs  professionals  who  have  a  good  knowledge  base  of  student  development  theories.  If  a  professional  is  not  competent  in  student  development  theories,  the  author  suggests  to  take  a  course  or  to  research  the  above  theories  to  find  their  theoretical  background,  limitations,  and  other  relevant  theories  not  included  on  this  handout.    The  goal  of  this  resource  is  to  assist  students  in  their  search  for  what  to  do  after  the  conclusion  of  their  college  experience.      In  order  to  evaluate  this  resources’  effectiveness,  one  should  utilize  basic  counseling  and  advanced  counseling  skills  in  combination  with  the  above  (and  other)  student  development  theories.  The  balance  of  challenge  and  support  can  be  helping  to  gauge  how  much  a  student  has  developed.  If  a  student  is  asking  for  answers,  they  may  be  in  the  3rd  Vector.  Knowing  this,  professionals  can  identify  influences,  situations,  and  strategies  that  can  help  to  explore  options.  Linking  all  of  this  back  to  the  Career  Planning  Process  diagram  can  help  to  select  what  step  the  student  might  need  to  take  next.    In  addition,  incorporating  the  experiential  learning  theory,  one  can  help  the  student  to  identify  whether  they  fit  as  an  Accommodator,  Diverger,  Coverger,  or  Assimilator.  This  can  be  then  linked  to  Holland’s  career  theory  to  identify  a  potential  career  path  or  avenue  to  explore.      Non-­‐traditional  students,  those  that  identify  as  LGBT  or  Q,  or  students  who  come  from  a  culturally  diverse  background  may  not  benefit  from  this  resource.  Instead,  it  is  suggested  that  outside  theories  are  referenced.  An  LGBT  Lifespan  model,  Critical  Race  Theory,  Spirituality,  Feminist,  or  other  moral,  ethical,  and  cognitive  reasoning  theories  may  be  best  suited  to  assist  students  with  diverse  needs.    Limitations:  Limitations  of  this  resource  vary  based  on  the  fluency  of  the  professional  in  their  knowledge  of  student  development  theories  and  their  ability  to  apply  theory  to  practice  in  their  work  with  students.  Not  buying  into  student  development  theories,  or  not  having  been  taught  these  cornerstones  can  limit  the  effectiveness  of  the  professional  and  this  handout.  Another  limitation  may  be  the  brief  nature  of  this  resource.  One  page  does  not  do  justice  to  the  wealth  of  information  and  guidance  that  these  theories  provide  to  professionals.  It  is  highly  recommended  that  professionals  research  and  practice  these  theories  if  they  wish  for  this  tool  to  be  effective  in  counseling  students  about  their  careers.      Purpose:  To  promote  student  learning  is  the  mission  of  most  student  affairs  professionals.  This  resource  helps  to  promote  student  learning  through  conversations  with  professionals  about  available  resources,  and  also  to  help  the  professional  judge  where  the  student  is  at  so  that  they  can  best  meet  their  needs  in  the  here-­‐and-­‐now.  Using  basic  counseling  skills  in  combination  with  the  above  theories  and  visuals  can  help  to  hone  in  on  specific  transitions  or  obstacles  students  are  facing.  This  resource  also  enables  professionals  to  offer  resources  and  help  students  explore  options  that  may  seem  unrealistic  or  unattainable  to  them.  Much  of  the  effectiveness  of  this  resource  will  depend  on  the  training  and  experience  of  the  professional  facilitating  the  discussion.    Resources:   Bridgewater  State  University  -­‐  Office  of  Career  Services:  http://www.bridgew.edu/CareerServices/parentspage.cfm       Evans,  N.  J.,  Forney,  D.  S.,  Guido,  F.  M.,  Patton,  L.  D.,  &  Renn,  K.  A.  (2010).  Student  development  in  college,  theory,  research,   and  practice.  (2nd  ed.).  San  Francisco,  CA:  Jossey-­‐Bass  Inc  Pub.     Goodman,  J.,  Schlossberg,  N  &  Anderson,  M.  (2011).  Counseling  Adults  in  Transition:  Linking  Schlossberg’s  Theory  with   Practice  in  a  Diverse  World.  (4th  ed.)  New  York:  Springer  Publishing  Company.     Kolb,  D.  (1999).  Learning  Style  Inventory.  Boston,  MA:  Hay  Group,  Hay  Resources  Direct.     Kolb,  D.,  &  Kolb,  A.  (2005).  The  Kolb  learning  style  inventory-­‐version  3.1  2005  technical  specifications  Available  from   www.learningfromexperience.com     Perry,  W.G.,  (1981).    Cognititve  and  ethical  growth:  the  making  of  meaning  (pp.  76-­‐116).       In  Chickering  and  Associates  (Eds.),  The  Modern  American  College.  Responding  to  the  New  Realities  of  Diverse  Students   in  a  Changing  Society.    San  Francisco:  Jossey-­‐Bass.     Schlossberg,  N.  http://www.transitionsthroughlife.com     Questions  or  Comments?  Contact  P.  Max  Quinn  -­‐  pquinn@student.bridgew.edu