Blended Coaching Participant Handouts

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Handouts to accompany Blended Coaching workshop materials.

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Blended Coaching Participant Handouts

  1. 1. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! 1Great Leaders = Great Schools ASPIRING PRINCIPALS PROGRAM DIRECTORS! COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE IN-PERSON TRAINING Afternoon 12:00p - 1:00p Lunch - West Campus (Enjoy) 1:00p - 1:10p Our Afternoon Work 1:10p - 1:25p Ladder of Inference 1:25p - 2:00p Bias in Listening 2:00p - 2:30p Situational Leadership Styles and Feedback 2:30p - 2:45p Break 2:45p - 3:10p Situational Leadership card sort 3:10p - 3:40p Situational Leadership Feedback in action 3:40p - 3:45p Insights, Ideas, Intentions 3:45p - 3:50p QuickWrite Reflection - "Quiet Five” 3:55p - 4:00p Plus/Delta Evaluations 4:00p - 5:00p LIA Observer Training Makeup Morning 9:00a - 9:15a Good Morning and Welcome! 9:15a - 9:20a Blended Coaching Framework 9:20a - 9:30a Situational Leadership Model II 9:30a - 10:30a Listening to Words 10:30a - 10:45a Break 10:45a - 11:15a Roadblocks to Active Listening I 11:15a - 11:45a Build a Model 11:45a -11:55a Recursive Listening 11:55a - 12:00p Debrief A coach is someone who (1) sees what others may not see through the high quality of his or her attention to listening, (2) is in the position to step back (or invite participants to step back) from the situation so that they have enough distance from it to get some perspective, (3) helps people see the difference between their intentions and their thinking or actions, and (4) helps people cut through patterns of illusions and self-deception caused by defensive thinking and behavior. Robert Hargrove, Masterful Coaching
  2. 2. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 2Great Leaders = Great Schools Think of a Resident that you struggled with coaching in the past year. If you could do the year over, what would you change to further support the Resident.
  3. 3. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 The Situational Leadership Model Ken Blanchard | Patricia Zigami | Drea Zigami | Victoria Halsey ! Development Level of the Individual 3Great Leaders = Great Schools
  4. 4. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 4Great Leaders = Great Schools ! What do Joan’s words tell you about her way of thinking and interacting? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________
  5. 5. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 5Great Leaders = Great Schools Assertions “It is 85 degrees outside.” • Facts that can be corroborated by a witness. They are either true or false and measured by a commonly held standard. • They do not represent the speaker’s opinion or judgement and describe an objective reality. Assessments “It is hot in this room!” • Judgements and opinions that reside in the speaker. • They are speaking acts that change our experience of reality, shape our future actions, and impact the way in which we behave. An effective coach might help Joan to unpack her statement and arrive at new interpretations. Blended Coaching, page 37 _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________
  6. 6. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 Let’s observe for this in a coach’s practice:
 6Great Leaders = Great Schools As you watch this feedback conversation, capture instances in which the COACH is confusing assessments with assertions. Choose three assessments that he made during his coaching session. Reframe the assessments by crafting questions that he could ask his coachee to help improve his practice. What data sources can he request that support his feedback to have an effective coaching session? Assessment Questions Data Sources 1 2 3
  7. 7. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 Coaching John to Action - A Case Study
 7Great Leaders = Great Schools Read the case study provided below. See if you can distinguish between John’s assertions and assessments. Divide you answers into two parts, one listing his assertions, and the other listing his assessments. ! John’s story: Things are going well. Though the rest of my team is not fully onboard with the new middle school culture plan so I have to do all of the work myself. I don’t understand why I have to treat these adults like students. I feel like I’m doing everything myself. The team came up with the school culture plan, everyone agreed and now people don’t want to follow-through. That means that I am the one left with hovering over adults to make sure they are standing at their doors ready to greet students, I am constantly checking to see if they are enforcing the classroom management plans that they had the autonomy to create. I think my mentor principal is undermining me too because I call a teacher out on not following the plan, they go to the mentor principal and it’s like the behavior is excused. Everyone wants me to pull kids out of class if they continually disrupt the class but they won’t follow their steps in implementing the plan. They get upset when I refuse to remove students because they didn’t follow the protocol which drives me crazy because we all had input in creating the protocol for our new middle school culture plan! ! The teachers are acting as if all of the changes have to be mine and that they don’t have to make any changes at all. Then they blame me when the middle school team gets called out at staff meetings for our culture issues and high number of referrals.
  8. 8. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 8Great Leaders = Great Schools AssertionsAssessments _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________
  9. 9. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 Read the following possible feedback to John from his Leadership Coach: Coach: Who are these teachers and what exactly are they refusing to do? John: My new teachers are constantly calling me to pull students out even though they haven’t followed the protocol appropriately. I try to enforce the protocol but my mentor principal sends someone to collect the kids because he said keeping them in class is too disruptive. I don’t know how I’m expected to have teachers follow the protocol if they can just override my authority. I asked my more experienced teachers to help the newbies but they say they’re overwhelmed and are struggling to manage their own workload with all the new changes in the building. I don’t understand this because we talked about all of this during our culture planning meetings and they all agreed to what I’m asking them to do. ! Coach: So it sounds like everyone is trying to manage their own individual challenges and no one is making the move to change their practice. Have you thought of ways you could encourage them to make some small changes? What conversations could you have with stakeholders to address the challenge to make it work How could you get your team members, with agreement from your mentor principal, to agree to do something different? ! NOTES:__________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ 9Great Leaders = Great Schools How does this feedback assist or not assist John in identifying clear next steps to improve his work with his team?
  10. 10. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 ! As you reflect on your own coaching practice, how often do you use assessments when coaching Residents? What is one thing you can begin to implement in your practice to leverage assertions to support Resident leadership development? ! 10Great Leaders = Great Schools ! Where is John along the Resident Development timeline. ! What does the coach need to do to help John improve his practice to increase his effectiveness?
  11. 11. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 11Great Leaders = Great Schools GORDON’S 12 ROADBLOCKS TO ACTIVE LISTENING The twelve “roadblocks” are common responses that get in the way of good listening. They are not necessarily wrong, but they are not listening. They interrupt the person’s own exploration, and in order to get back to his and her own process, the person must go around them (hence the term roadblock.)! ! 1. Order, directing, or commanding Here a direction is given with the force of some authority behind it. There may be actual authority (as with a parent or employer), or the words may simply be phrased in an authoritarian way. Some examples: Don’t say that! You’ve got to face up to reality. Go right back there and tell her you’re sorry! ! 2. Warning or threatening These messages are similar to directing, but they also cary an overt or covert threat of impending negative consequences if the advice or direction is not followed. It may be a threat that the individual will carry out, or a prediction of a bad outcome if the other doesn’t comply. Some examples: If you don’t start treating him better you’ll lose him. You’d better listen to me or you’ll be sorry. You are really asking for trouble when you do that. ! 3. Giving advice, making suggestions, arguing, lecturing Here a direction is given with the force of some authority behind it. There may be actual authority (as with a parent or employer), or the words may simply be phrased in an authoritarian way. Some examples: Don’t say that! You’ve got to face up to reality. Go right back there and tell her you’re sorry! ! 4. Persuading with logic, arguing, lecturing The underlying assumption in these is that the person has not adequately reasoned through it and needs help doing so. Some examples: The facts are that… Yes, but… Let’s think this through… ! 5. Moralizing, preaching, telling them their duty An underlying moral code is invoked here in “should’ or “ought” language. The implicit communication is instruction in proper conduct. Some examples: You should… You really ought to… It’s your duty as a … to…
  12. 12. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 12Great Leaders = Great Schools 6. Judging, criticizing, disagreeing, blaming The common element her is an implication that there is something wrong with the person or with what he or she has said. Some examples: It’s your own fault. You’re being so selfish. You’re wrong. ! 7. Agreeing, approving, praising This kind of message gives a sanction or approval to what has been said. This, too, stops the communication process and may also imply an uneven relationship between speaker and listener. True listening is different from approving and does not require approval. Some examples: I think you’re absolutely right. That’s what I would do. You’re a good _____. ! 8. Shaming, ridiculing, labeling, name-calling Disapproval is more overt and is directed at the individual in the hopes of shaming or correcting a behavior or attitude. Some examples: That’s really immature. You should be ashamed of yourself. How could you do such a thing? ! 9. Interpreting, analyzing This is a very common and tempting one for counselors: to seek out the hidden meaning for the person and give your own interpretation. Some examples: You don’t really mean that. Do you know what your real problem is? You’re just trying to me upset. ! 10. Reassuring, sympathizing, consoling The intent here is to usually help the person feel better. It interferes with the spontaneous flow of communication. Some examples: There, there, it’s not all bad. I’m sure things are going to work out all right. Don’t worry, you’ll look back on this year and laugh 11. Questioning, probing People also mistake asking questions for good listening. The intent is to probe further, to find out more. A hidden communication from the questioner, however, is that he or she will be able to find a solution as soon as enough questions have been asked. Questions interfere with the spontaneous flow of communication, diverting it in directions of interest to the questioner but not, perhaps, of help or concern to the speaker. Inflecting the voice upward at the end of a statement turns it into a question. Some examples: You should… You really ought to… It’s your duty as a … to… ! 12. Withdrawing, distracting, humoring, changing the subject An attempt to “take the person’s mind off it.” It directly diverts communication, and underneath implies that what the person is saying is not important or should not be pursued. Some examples: Let’s talk about this some other time. That reminds me of a time when I… I hear things are going well with __. copyright 2000 by Miller and Rollnick
  13. 13. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 Team Goal: Be the first team to create an exact replica of a tangram picture within a given time frame.
 13Great Leaders = Great Schools
  14. 14. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 RECURSIVE LISTENING
 14Great Leaders = Great Schools
  15. 15. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 LADDER OF INFERENCE 
 15Great Leaders = Great Schools ! How do you teach or reinforce the ladder of inference framework with Residents? GREAT IDEAS FROM MY COLLEAGUES
  16. 16. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 BIAS IN LISTENING ! ! Using the space provided below, quickly !! ! ! write your answers to the following !! ! ! ! ! !! ! questions.
 16Great Leaders = Great Schools What is half of thirteen? Why are manhole covers round? What’s in a Bic? Every leadership coach brings personal points ! of view to the coaching role. Gender, culture,! age, and experience all shape the way we perceive! others and their contexts.
  17. 17. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 Meet Mary
 17Great Leaders = Great Schools Mary is very thin. She walks with her head down. Her hair is long and straight and she wears it pulled back in a ponytail. She has green nail polish on her toes. She wears a tee shirts with spikes on them. She bites her fingernails. She is in her 20s. ! She has three children aged 5, 3, and 2. She has an AA degree from a local community college. She speaks two languages. She has been married twice. She does not wear makeup. ! She sits with her legs crossed. She does not make eye contact. Her voice is very soft. ! She does not smile. Ever. Without thinking too much, develop a quick narrative as to who Mary is as a person.
  18. 18. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 18Great Leaders = Great Schools Have there been any instances in your professional practice where your life experiences influenced how you coached Residents?! (i.e. roadblocks to listening, bias)! _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________
  19. 19. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 THE POWER OF FEEDBACK Record your observations as you watched the demonstrations of different types of feedback and their effect on performance. ! Demonstration One What happened? ! ! ! Demonstration Two What happened? ! ! ! Demonstration Three What happened? ! ! ! Demonstration Four What happened?
 19Great Leaders = Great Schools
  20. 20. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 
 20Great Leaders = Great Schools
  21. 21. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 ! 21Great Leaders = Great Schools As you watch this film clip, observe the leader’s practice. Did the leader give feedback to the team that was: FOCUSD ON BEHAVIOR? SPECIFIC? CONTEXT CONTROLLED? As you watch this film clip, observe the leader’s practice. Did the leader give feedback to the team that was: FOCUSD ON BEHAVIOR? SPECIFIC? CONTEXT CONTROLLED?
  22. 22. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 SITUATIONAL LEADERSHIP IN FILM Movie Clip One What type of feedback was given to team? What situational leadership style was employed by the leader? What was the impact on the team? ! Movie Clip Two What type of feedback was given to team? What situational leadership style was employed by the leader? What was the impact on the team? ! Movie Clip Three What type of feedback was given to team? What situational leadership style was employed by the leader? What was the impact on the team? ! Movie Clip Four What type of feedback was given to team? What situational leadership style was employed by the leader? What was the impact on the team?
 22Great Leaders = Great Schools
  23. 23. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 23Great Leaders = Great Schools Situational Leadership Feedback One: _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ ! Situational Leadership Feedback Two: _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________
  24. 24. New Leaders, Inc Wednesday, July 9, 2014 24Great Leaders = Great Schools

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