Poetic devices

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  • 1. Poetic DevicesTaken fromWrite Source 2000
  • 2. Elements of Poetry Understanding the elements and devices of poetry will help you better comprehend the meanings of poems. Remember, often in poetry, the meaning of the words isn’t literal. It’s figurative.
  • 3. Understanding Internalizing As you already know, figurative language and symbolism are very important to poetry. However, there are other elements that help create images, rhythm, and meaning.
  • 4. Alliteration The repeating of beginning consonant sounds Ex: “creamy and crunchy” Ex: “nodded nearly napping” – “The Raven”
  • 5. Assonance The repetition of vowel sound Notice the repetition of the long “i” sound in the following example Till the shining scythes went far and wide And cut it down to dry. - “The Hayloft” by R.L. Stevenson
  • 6. Consonance The repetition of consonant sounds (differs from alliteration because the sounds can be anywhere within the word, not just the beginning) The sailor sings of ropes and things In ships upon the seas. - “Singing”
  • 7. End Rhyme The rhyming of words at the end of two or more lines of poetry She always had to burn a light Beside her attic bed at night. - “The Night Light” by Robert Frost
  • 8. Rhyme Scheme A pattern of lines that rhyme in poetry There are many different common rhyme schemes: AABB, ABAB, and AAAB (to name a few) I shall be telling this with a sigh A somewhere B ages and ages hence: A two roads A diverged in a wood, and I – B I took the one less traveled by,
  • 9. Internal Rhyme The rhyming of words within one line of poetry Jack Sprat could eat no fat Peter Peter pumpkin eater
  • 10. Onomatopoeia The use of a word that sounds like what it means buzz, gunk, gushy, swish, zigzag, zip
  • 11. Repetition The repeating of a word or phrase to add rhythm or to emphasize an ideaWhile I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,As of someone gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door – - “The Raven” by E.A. Poe
  • 12. Refrain Line, lines, or stanza repeated throughout a poem (like a “chorus” in a song) Quote the raven, “Never more.” - “The Raven” by E.A. Poe
  • 13. Stanza A group of lines within a poem that go together Stanzas may consist of anywhere from two or more lines
  • 14. Quatrain A four-line stanza Common rhyme schemes in quatrains are AABB, ABAB, and AAAB I wish I had no teachers. That’s what I’d like to see. I’d do whatever I wanted to, And nobody’d yell at me.