Marvellous Machines teacher-guided program: pre-visit slideshow

  • 8,675 views
Uploaded on

This Marvellous Machines Slidecast is a pre-visit activity that prepares years 3 to 4/5 for the Marvellous Machines Drawing Adventure program at the Powerhouse Museum. It talks about the different …

This Marvellous Machines Slidecast is a pre-visit activity that prepares years 3 to 4/5 for the Marvellous Machines Drawing Adventure program at the Powerhouse Museum. It talks about the different types of simple machines and how simple machines work separately and in combination.
The slidecast is hyperlinked to various online resources on machines and drawing.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
8,675
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2

Actions

Shares
Downloads
57
Comments
0
Likes
2

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Welcome to another Powerhouse Museum slidecast. Today’s slidecast, Marvellous Machines was written by Angus Tse with input from Steve Miller. The reader is Peter Mahony.
  • Our world is full of machines. All sorts of marvellous machines. They help us in many ways. In fact, we all make use of machines every day.
    So, just exactly what are machines?
    And how do they help us?
    Let’s explore.
  • A great place for finding out about machines is Sydney’s Powerhouse Museum.
    Why do you think the museum is called the Powerhouse?
  • Once upon a time, the Powerhouse Museum was a power station. This huge building housed massive machines. Machines such as giant turbines that were driven by steam to make electricity. The steam was produced in boilers by burning coal.
    What do you think happened to the electricity?
  • It powered other machines.
    In fact, it powered a large network of trams before 1961. They crisscrossed Sydney, rumbling and rattling, moving people about.
    Electric trams! What a great idea!
    Times changed. The trams and the turbines stopped running. The building was neglected, sad and idle.
    But now it’s back! Busier, brighter and a happier place than ever before. And much cleaner too. The machines you see at Powerhouse Museum today run on steam generated by natural gas. Even though some of them are very old, they like their new home and they may even perform for you!
    To find out more about the Powerhouse Museum, click on the centre image. [Wait till the slidecast finished then come back to this slide and click on the centre image for the Facts and Figures on the Powerhouse Museum website.]
  • OK! Back to our marvellous machines. Let’s have a close look at simple machines, and also at how simple machines can work together. Sometimes very big and complex machines are actually a combination of a few simple machines.
    So, what exactly are simple machines?
  • Simple machines are devices which make work easier, and have few or no moving parts. There are six different types of simple machine.
    To discover all six types of simple machines, I’ll need your help. At the bottom of each screen you’ll find some helpful hints. For each type of simple machine you’ll see an example and description, and also the name but with some letters missing.
  • Yes, our first simple machine is a lever.
  • Another type of simple machine can make it easier to move objects by rolling them, and reducing friction.
    What is it called?
  • It is called the wheel and axle.
  • The third type makes moving objects upwards easier.
  • It is an inclined plane.
  • The fourth one makes pushing material apart easier.
  • It is known as a wedge.
  • The fifth one is a rotating inclined plane.
  • It is a screw.
  • And number six makes lifting heavy objects easier by redirecting the force.
  • It is a pulley.
  • Let’s look at some examples of these simple machines from the world around us.
    Here are some familiar examples of lever.
    a pair of scissor (the handles and the blades, not the cutting edges)
    a bottle opener
    a fishing rod
    a shovel, and
    a fan
  • Examples of wheel and axle include:
    wheels of shopping trolley
    wheels of roller skates
    wheels of a bicycle, and
    a steering wheel
  • Examples of inclined plane include:
    a boat ramp, and
    a flight of stairs
  • Examples of a wedge include:
    a zipper
    the cutting edges of those scissors
    the sharp edge of an axe
    Also note that a wedge is actually made up of two inclined planes.
  • Examples of a rotating inclined plane include:
    a screw
    The lid of a jar, and
    bolts
  • Examples of pulley can be found in:
    a flag pole
    a crane, and
    the sails of a sailing boat.
  • Let’s review the six different types of simple machines: lever, wheel and axle, inclined plane, wedge, screw and pulley.
    Great work! Now let’s move on to compound machines.
  • And here’s where things get even more interesting. Compound machines are made up of two or more simple machines working together.
  • A crane is one beautiful example of a compound machine. Look closely at the crane.
    What simple machines can you find at work?
  • Did you find a lever, pulley and wheel and axle?
    Well done.
  • This unusual looking bicycle was popular around 150 years ago. It is called the penny farthing and you will find this one in the Powerhouse museum’s Transport exhibition.
  • Look closely at the penny farthing.
    Can you find any examples of wheel and axle?
  • Well, the large front and the small back wheels and their axles are obvious.
    Any more?
  • The pedals.
    Any more?
    Actually the handlebar is also an example of wheel and axle.
    To find out more about the penny farthing, click on the image and visit the Powerhouse Museum’s online collection. [Wait till the slidecast finished then come back to this slide and click on the image to find out more about the penny farthing from the Museum online collection]
  • This beautiful airplane is the Catalina Flying Boat, also from the Transport exhibition. It was the most successful flying boat ever produced and the one that you will see in the exhibition pioneered the route from Sydney to Chile in South America by ‘island hopping’ across the Pacific.
  • Captain P. G. Taylor set off from the flying boat base of Rose Bay in Sydney on 13 March 1951. He flew to Grafton and then headed east for Chile the next morning. Stopping at various South Pacific islands along the way before arriving at Valpariso, capital of Chile on 26 March 1951. [Captain Taylor then set off at Valpariso on 3 April and arrived back in Sydney on 21 April.]
  • Captain Taylor donated Frigate Bird II to the Powerhouse Museum in 1961. This is the Frigate Bird II on display in the Transport exhibition. Including a wingspan of over 30 metres, it is the biggest object in the Museum and it is really huge! And looks amazing hanging up in the roof.
    Can you find any examples of a wedge in this flying boat?
    Without these simple machines the flying boat simply would not work. They reduce friction and allow it to literally slice through the air and the water.
  • Yes, one example of a wedge is the front edge of the wing.
    Can you think of any others?
  • Others include the propeller blade and the bow.
    To find out more about the Catalina from the Museum’s online collection, click on the image. [Wait till the slidecast finished then come back to this slide and click on the image to find out more about the Catalina flying boat from the Museum online collection.]
  • Another wonderful example of a compound machine is the Boulton and Watt rotative engine.
    From when it was first started up in 1875, this machine powered a London brewery for over one hundred years. It is definitely one of the most precious objects in the whole museum. It is one of the earliest rotative, or wheel-turning steam engines ever to be built and is the oldest in the world that can still be seen working.
  • Here is the front view of the rotative steam engine and some of its main parts, notice the piston, the rocking arm which is also known as the beam, the connecting rod, the sun and planet gears and the fly wheel
    How does each work together and what do they do?
  • Basically, this engine turns the up and down motion of the piston into round and round motion which can be used to drive other machines.
    Let’s look closely at how this machine works. First, steam pressure drives the piston up and down inside the cylinder on the left.
  • This energy moves the rocking arm above, drives the connecting rod and is converted into circular motion by the sun and planet gears. The round and round motion of the large flying wheel was then used to drive other machines.
  • Look closely at this machine.
    What about the rocking arm and the connecting rod?
  • Yes, both are levers.
  • And what type of simple machine are the sun and planet gears and the flying wheel?
  • They are wheel and axle.
  • To see the animations showing how different parts of the Boulton and Watt steam engine work, click on the sun and planet gears image which is a link to the London Science Museum’s webpage. [Wait till the slidecast finished. The same hyperlink is featured in the last slide.]
    Click on the sketch of the Boulton and Watt rotative steam engine and visit the Powerhouse Museum’s online collection to find out more about it. [Wait till the slidecast finished. The same hyperlink is featured in the last slide.]
    Simple machines, which have few or no moving parts. And compound machines. Two or more simple machines working together as a team.
    I hope you have enjoyed this exploration of the amazing world of machines.
    Now that you know what they are, I reckon you’ll spot lots of simple and compound machines all around you. They are helping us with our work and play. Keep your eyes peeled!
  • Did you know that a really good way to understand machines is to draw them?
    Sarah Simblet, who wrote a book called ‘the Drawing Book’, says ‘By drawing the world around us, we learn to see it’.
    Here at the Powerhouse Museum we think she’s right.
  • By doing your own drawings of machines, we reckon you’ll not only notice heaps more interesting details, but you’ll also see the connections between the different parts of the machine. This type of drawing is called observational drawing.
  • It’s also a great idea to include the name of the thing you are drawing, and also the names of any parts and simple machines you observe.
    I’ll say goodbye for now, and leave you with some examples of drawings done here at Powerhouse Museum …
  • … and also a few online resources on machines and drawings for you to check out later.
    Hooroo for now!

Transcript

  • 1. Marvellous Machines part of the Marvellous Machines Drawing Adventure school program for years 3 to 5
  • 2. Marvellous Machines at the Powerhouse Museum
  • 3. Marvellous Machines at the Powerhouse Museum
  • 4. Marvellous Machines at the Powerhouse Museum
  • 5. What are simple machines?
  • 6. What are simple machines? Machines with few or no moving parts that are used to make work easier
  • 7. Types of Simple Machines Helps lift heavy objects using longer distances L e v e r
  • 8. Types of Simple Machines Helps lift heavy objects using longer distances L e v e r Makes it easy to move objects by rolling them, and reducing friction W h _ _ l and _ x l _
  • 9. Types of Simple Machines Helps lift heavy objects using longer distances L e v e r Makes it easy to move objects by rolling them, and reducing friction W h e e l and a x l e
  • 10. Types of Simple Machines Helps lift heavy objects using longer distances L e v e r Makes it easy to move objects by rolling them, and reducing friction W h e e l and a x l e Makes it easier to move objects upward; a longer path but easier lifting _ n c l _ n _ d p l _ n _
  • 11. Types of Simple Machines Helps lift heavy objects using longer distances L e v e r Makes it easy to move objects by rolling them, and reducing friction W h e e l and a x l e Makes it easier to move objects upward; a longer path but easier lifting i n c l i n e d p l a n e
  • 12. Types of Simple Machines Pushes material apart W _ d g _
  • 13. Types of Simple Machines Pushes material apart W e d g e
  • 14. Types of Simple Machines Pushes material apart W e d g e A rotating inclined plane S c r _ w
  • 15. Types of Simple Machines Pushes material apart W e d g e A rotating inclined plane S c r e w
  • 16. Types of Simple Machines Pushes material apart W e d g e A rotating inclined plane S c r e w Makes lifting heavy objects easier by redirecting the force P _ l l _ y
  • 17. Types of Simple Machines Pushes material apart W e d g e A rotating inclined plane S c r e w Makes lifting heavy objects easier by redirecting the force P u l l e y
  • 18. Lever Examples of machines using lever: bottle opener, nutcracker, fishing rod, fan, scissors and shovel.
  • 19. Wheel and Axle Examples of machines with wheel and axle: car, bicycle, office chair, shopping cart, roller skates
  • 20. Inclined plane Examples of inclined plane: ramps and stairs
  • 21. Wedge Examples of machines with wedges: axe, doorstop, saw, zipper, scissors, knife, fork, bow of a boat
  • 22. Screw Examples of machines with screws: screws, bolts, clamps, jar lids, spinning stools, spiral staircases
  • 23. Pulley Examples of machines with pulleys: flag pole, sails, cranes, window shades and blinds
  • 24. Simple Machines make work easier Types of simple machine include: - lever - wheel and axle - inclined plane - wedge - screw - pulley
  • 25. Compound machines Simple machines connected to each other to work together
  • 26. Compound machines Simple machines connected to each other to work together
  • 27. Compound machines Simple machines connected to each other to work together For example, a crane has simple machines such as levers, pulleys, wheel and axle and screws.
  • 28. Examples of compound machine Penny farthing
  • 29. Examples of compound machine Penny farthing Wheel & axle
  • 30. Examples of compound machine Penny farthing wheel Wheel & axle
  • 31. Examples of compound machine Penny farthing Pedal wheel Handlebar Wheel & axle
  • 32. Examples of compound machine Catalina flying boat
  • 33. Frigate Bird II Covering a distance of 13,679 km, the famous Australian pilot, Captain P. G. Taylor, pioneered the first successful flight between Australia and South America across the South Pacific Ocean in 1951. Sydney 13 March 1951 21 April 1951 Grafton Valpariso, Chile 26 March 1951 3 April 1951
  • 34. Examples of compound machine Catalina flying boat Wedge
  • 35. Examples of compound machine Catalina flying boat Wing Wedge
  • 36. Examples of compound machine Catalina flying boat Propellor blade Bow Wing Wedge
  • 37. Examples of compound machine Boulton & Watt rotative engine
  • 38. Examples of compound machine Boulton & Watt rotative engine
  • 39. Examples of compound machine Boulton & Watt rotative engine cylinder
  • 40. Examples of compound machine Boulton & Watt rotative engine
  • 41. Examples of compound machine Boulton & Watt rotative engine Rocking arm/beam Connecting rod
  • 42. Examples of compound machine Boulton & Watt rotative engine Rocking arm/beam Connecting rod LEVER
  • 43. Examples of compound machine Boulton & Watt rotative engine Rocking arm/beam Connecting rod Fly wheel Sun & planet gears LEVER
  • 44. Examples of compound machine Boulton & Watt rotative engine Rocking arm/beam Connecting rod Fly wheel Sun & planet gears LEVER Wheel & axle
  • 45. Examples of compound machine Boulton & Watt rotative engine Rocking arm/beam Connecting rod Fly wheel Sun & planet gears LEVER Wheel & axle
  • 46. ‘By drawing the world around us, we learn to see it.’ Sarah Simblet The Drawing Book
  • 47. Observational drawing Helps you look more closely
  • 48. Sketch with named parts A drawing with words on it to explain the different parts
  • 49. Marvellous Machines at the Powerhouse Museum http://www.powerhousemuseum.com
  • 50. Online resources:- 1. Online activities on simple machines 2. The Boulton and Watt engine: a recorded floor talk and transcript by Powerhouse Museum curator Debbie Rudder, and a panoramic view of the engine 3. The London Science Museum’s online animation of the Boulton and Watt engine 4. Powerhouse Museum’s online collection 5. Marvellous Machines Drawing Adventure program for years 3 to 5 Acknowledgements:- Script by Angus Tse, Steve Miller and Peter Mahony, Education and Program Development, Powerhouse Museum. Narrated by Peter Mahony. Illustrations:- Slides 48 & 49 Drawn by years 3-4 students from Ultimo Public School, Sydney.