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Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
Ap gov final project
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Ap gov final project

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  • 1. Kara PowellConstitutional Underpinnings of theUnited States Government
  • 2. Origins of the US Government Magna Carta (1215)- The first attempt to limitthe power of the British monarch. English Bill of Rights (1689)- Guaranteed freeparliamentary elections, the right to a speedytrial, freedom of excessive bails and cruel andunusual punishment, the right to petition to theKind, and protection of armies during time ofpeace. Enlightenment (discussed on next slide)
  • 3. 5 Key Enlightenment Ideas Reason Natural Laws Progress Liberty Toleration
  • 4. 3 Key EnlightenmentPhilosophers John Locke Natural rights-life, liberty, and property Government should be formed on consent of thegoverned Charles de Montesquieu Separation of powers among branches System of divided authority to prevent one branchfrom gaining too much authority Jean-Jacques Rousseau Social contract between people and government Rulers are servants to the community
  • 5. Colonial Times Colonial charters-colonies formed from charterfrom the King House of Burgesses- VA established the firstrepresentative legislature in the colonies in 1619 Mayflower Compact- an agreement in 1620signed by colonists aboard the Mayflower The First Continental Congress- Delegates from12 colonies met in Philadelphia in 1774. Sent aDeclaration of Rights to the King
  • 6. Troubles with BritainFrench andIndian War(1756-1763)Sugar Act(1764)Stamp Act(1765)
  • 7. Troubles with Britain Con’t…Townshend Acts(1767)Boston Massacre(1770)Boston Tea Party(1772)Coercive/IntolerableActs (1774)
  • 8. The Second ContinentalCongress May 1775 Delegates from 13 colonies The Declaration of Independence Theory of government based on natural rights andsocial contract List of grievances A statement of colonial unity and separation fromBritain Articles of Confederation (continued on nextslide)
  • 9. Articles of Confederation First national constitution for the US Unicameral legislative branch League of friendship among states Weak national government No executive or judicial branches Amendments would require unanimous vote
  • 10. The national government wastoo weakStates taxed each other andprinted their own money,which led to economic chaosNo branch to uphold lawsViolence broke out (Shay’sRebellion)Problems withthe Articles ofConfederation
  • 11. Test Your Knowledge1. The Articles of Confederation establishedI. A unicameral legislatureII. The supremacy of state legislaturesIII. A chief executiveIV. A national court(A) II only (D) I, III, and IV only(B) I and II only (E) II, III, and IV only(C) I, II, and III only
  • 12. Constitutional Convention Philadelphia, May 1787 Delegates from every state except Rhode Island Decided to write new Constitution Agreed on Federal system Agreed on three branches Many plans presented, such as the Virginia Planand the New Jersey Plan (discussed on next slide)Picture source:www.whitehouse.gov
  • 13. Important people at theConstitutional Convention Thomas Jefferson James Madison (shown on left) Alexander Hamilton (shown on right) George WashingtonPicture Source:www.nps.gov
  • 14. Test Your KnowledgeBase your answers to questions 1 and 2 on the quote belowand on your knowledge of U.S. government and politics."What signify a few lives lost in a century or two? The tree ofliberty must be refreshed from time to time, with the blood ofpatriots and tyrants. It is its natural manure."– Thomas Jefferson, 17872.Thomas Jefferson expressed the above belief in theimmediate aftermath of(A) Bacons Rebellion (D) the Whiskey Rebellion(B) Pontiacs Rebellion (E) Nat Turners Rebellion(C) Shays Rebellion3. Jeffersons remarks constitute an argument in support of the(A) First Amendment (D) Fifth Amendment(B) Second Amendment (E) Eighth Amendment(C) Fourth Amendment
  • 15. VPPlan• BicameralLegislature• Representation ineach house basedon population ormonetarycontributions• Single executive• Judges chosen bylegislative branchNJPlan• Unicamerallegislative• Representationequal among thestates• Plural executive• Judges chosen bythe executivebranchPicture Sources: www.yellowmaps.comwwp.greenwichmeantime.com
  • 16. Compromises at the ConstitutionalConvention Connecticut (Great) Compromise- Bicamerallegislative branch with the Senate having equalrepresentation for each state and the Househaving representation based on population Three-Fifths Compromise- each state wouldcount slaves as 3/5 of a person-This resolvedrepresentation and taxing issues Commerce and Slave Trade Compromise-Congress could not tax exports from the states orban slave trade for 20 years-this resolvedproblems between the North and the South
  • 17. FederalistsFor Constitution to be ratifiedJames Madison, John Jay,Alexander HamiltonWanted strong nationalgovernmentDidn’t need a Bill of Rights-Constitution was strong enoughFederalist PapersAnti-FederalistsAgainst the Constitution beingratifiedPatrick Henry, Richard HenryLee, George Mason, SamAdamsWanted strong stategovernmentsWanted a Bill of Rights
  • 18. Ratification of the Constitution Ratified by 9/13 states September 17, 1787Picture Source:www.house.gov
  • 19. Principles in the Constitution Limited government-government has limits on itspowers Popular Sovereignty- government’s authority is bythe people Separation of powers-separated among the threebranches Checks and balances- each branch limited byother branches Federalism-division of government betweennational and state levels
  • 20. Checks and BalancesPicture Source: http://rosseconcp.wikispaces.com
  • 21. Separation of Powers Legislative-Creates Laws Executive-Enforces Laws Judicial-Interprets LawsJudicialExecutiveLegislative
  • 22. School House Rock Video to ReviewChecks and Balances/Separation ofPowers http://www.schooltube.com/video/9ee8d7e4bef24e8394b4/
  • 23. Articles in the ConstitutionI-Legislative BranchII-Executive BranchIII-Judicial BranchIV-Intergovernmental RelationshipsV-Amendment ProcessVI-Supremacy of the ConstitutionVII-Ratification Process
  • 24. Amendment Process 4 methods1. Proposed by 2/3 vote of each house of Congressand ratified by ¾ of state legislatures (used 26times)2. Proposed by 2/3 vote of each house of Congressand ratified by a special convention in at least ¾ ofall states (used once)3. Proposed by national convention called byCongress at the request of 2/3 of the statelegislatures and ratified by ¾ of the statelegislatures (never used)4. Proposed by national convention called byCongress at the request of 2/3 of the statelegislatures and ratified by special conventions in at
  • 25. Informal Amendment Process Legislative actions-Congress passes acts thatmore clearly define the meaning of theConstitution Executive actions-to expand presidential authority Judicial review-interpret constitution/decide whatis unconstitutional Customs and precedents-example: no term limituntil the 22nd amendment was passed
  • 26. Test Your Knowledge4. Which of the following statements regarding constitutionalamendments is correct?(A) The Constitution has never been amended by aconstitutional convention.(B) No constitutional amendment has ever beensuccessfully repealed.(C) The majority of proposed amendments have beenratified.(D) Every state legislature requires a three-fourths majorityfor ratification.(E) A constitutional amendment requires the signature ofthe President.
  • 27. Bill of Rights First 10 amendments of the Constitution Added to satisfy Anti-Federalists Passed by Congress September 25, 1789. Ratified December 15, 1791. Visit this site to read the Bill of Rights:http://billofrightsinstitute.org/founding-documents/bill-of-rights/
  • 28. List of ALL Amendments (includingBill of Rights)Bill of RightsAmendment 1 Freedoms, Petitions,AssemblyAmendment 2 Right to bear armsAmendment 3 Quartering of soldiersAmendment 4 Search and arrestAmendment 5 Rights in criminal casesAmendment 6 Right to a fair trialAmendment 7 Rights in civil casesAmendment 8 Bail, fines, punishmentAmendment 9 Rights retained by thePeopleAmendment 10 States rightsLater AmendmentsAmendment 11 Lawsuits against statesAmendment 12 Presidential electionsAmendment 13 Abolition of slaveryAmendment 14 Civil rightsAmendment 15 Black suffrageAmendment 16 Income taxesAmendment 17 Senatorial electionsAmendment 18 Prohibition of liquorAmendment 19 Womens suffrageAmendment 20 Terms of officeAmendment 21 Repeal of ProhibitionAmendment 22 Term Limits for thePresidencyAmendment 23 Washington, D.C.,suffrageAmendment 24 Abolition of poll taxesAmendment 25 Presidential successionAmendment 26 18-year-old suffrage
  • 29. Test Your Knowledge5. Since the adoption of the Bill of Rights, the greatestnumber of constitutional amendments have served to(A) broaden the governments role in the economy(B) expand voting rights to the disenfranchised(C) reform Congress to counteract corruption(D) formalize the concept of judicial review(E) clarify the federal structure of government6. In 1933, the Eighteenth Amendment was repealed bythe(A) Nineteenth Amendment(B) Twentieth Amendment(C) Twenty-first Amendment(D) Twenty-sixth Amendment(E) Twenty-seventh Amendmen
  • 30. Marbury v. Madison 1803Established judicial review Chief Justice John Marshall (shown in picturebelow)Picture Source:www.lva.virginia.gov
  • 31. Unwritten Traditions Political parties are not found in the Constitution. President’s cabinet was not specifically in theConstitution Senatorial Courtesy-The President much firstseek the approval of the senator or senators ofthe President’s party from the state in which thenominee will serve.
  • 32. Answers to Test Your KnowledgeQuestions1. B2. C3. B4. A5. B6. C
  • 33. Information Sources Pamela, K. Lamb. 5 Steps to a 5 Ap Us Governmentand Politics. [S.l.]: Mcgraw-Hill Contemporary, 2011.Print. Krieger, Larry. AP U.S. Government and PoliticsCrash Course. Piscataway, NJ: Research &Education Association, 2010. Print. "Sources for the Individual Delegate AttendanceRecord | Teaching American History."TeachingAmerican History. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 May 2013.<http://teachingamericanhistory.org"AP USGovernment and Politics Questions Catalogue." N.p.,n.d. Web. 18 May 2013.<http://www.eduware.com/>.The practice testquestions came from this website. "Bill of Rights and Later Amendments." N.p., n.d.

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