Advocating the scientific self

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  • 1. Advocating the Scientific-self – Tips for Promoting a Researcher's Online Presence! Petro Poutanen, researcher, Phd candidate Media and Communication Studies, University of Helsinki
  • 2. (DIGITAL) ME!
  • 3. AGENDA! MOTIVES ARENAS DOING
  • 4. MOTIVES!
  • 5. FROM MONOLOGUE TO DIALOGUE! Communication is what scientists do – within the boundaries of the scientific community. Is it time to break down the walls?
  • 6. WEB 2.0 IS TRANSFORMING THE WAYS SCIENCE IS BEING DONE!
  • 7. ALMOST EVERYBODY IS ON SOCIAL MEDIA! http://pewinternet.org/~/media//Files/Reports/2013/PIP_Social_networking_sites_update.pdf!
  • 8. SOCIAL MEDIA IS ABOUT – SOCIALIZING! ! http://pewinternet.org/~/media//Files/Reports/2011/Why%20Americans%20Use%20Social%20Media.pdf
  • 9. Goodier & Czerniewicz (2012)
  • 10. SOME MORE REASONS FOR ENGAGING ONLINE! Personal motives – networking, presence, brand, learning… Common motives – research impact, openness & integrity, publicity, demythologization…
  • 11. ARENAS!
  • 12. “Online social media tools can be some of the most rewarding and informative resources for scientists—IF you know how to use them.” – Bik & Goldstein, Plos Biol 11(4), (2013)
  • 13. DOING!
  • 14. 1. Profiling 2. Networking and Collaborating 3. Sharing
  • 15. PROFILING! Putting up your academic profile and telling about facts, results, and opinions.
  • 16. NETWORKING & COLLABORATING! Connecting and collaborating with colleagues and building audiences.
  • 17. SHARING! Sharing your data and research, lecture slides, and learning materials.
  • 18. Work load Bad publicity Academic reputation Unpredictability Stealing Loss of authority Unvoluntary participation Good reputaion Dissemination Self-development & Learning Fast Direct Openess Easy Networking Precence Feedback & Quality assurance
  • 19. HOW TO START? (Bik & Goldstein, 2013) ! 1. Explore guides to social media* 2. Establish a professional site 3. Find people and do network 4. Manage your readings 5. Engage and be open-minded 6. Find your audience *see the list of links at the end of this presentation!
  • 20. The prevailing contract between science and society was set up to sustain the production of 'reliable knowledge'; a new one must ensure the production of 'socially robust knowledge‘ … the authority of science will need to be legitimated again and again. – Michael Gibbons, Nature 402, C81 (1999)
  • 21. THANK YOU!!
  • 22. References! Bik HM, Goldstein MC (2013) An Introduction to Social Media for Scientists. PLoS Biol 11(4): e1001535. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001535 Gibbon, Michael (1999) Science’s new social contract with society. Nature 402, C81 http://www7.inra.fr/internet/Projets/scientific-transaction.old/bibliotheque/Michael_Gibbons.pdf? PHPSESSID=63d8b9c95b517c8ed7d47d116fe93e7b Goodier & Czerniewicz (2012) Academics’ online presence: A four-step guide to taking control of your visibility. OpenUCT Initiative. University of Cape Town. http://openuct.uct.ac.za/sites/default/files/Online%20Visibility%20Guidelines.pdf Poutanen, Petro (2012) Unwilling self-marketers – a small media guide for scientists. A blog post. http://blogs.helsinki.fi/pkpoutan/unwilling-self-marketers-a-small-media-guide-for-scientists/ Wilcox, Christie (2012) Guest Editorial: It's Time To e-Volve: Taking Responsibility for Science Communication in a Digital Age. Biol. Bull. April 1, 2012 vol. 222 no. 2 85-87. Wilcox, Christie (2011) Social Media for Scientists. Scientific America. http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/science-sushi/2011/09/27/social-media-for-scientists-part-1-its-our- job/
  • 23. Important sites! Academic Profiles ! Google Scholar, Mendeley, LinkedIn, Academia.edu, Blogs, your institution’s home page Social Networking & Collaborating !Facebook, Twitter, Academia.edu, Research Gate Content Sharing ! arXiv, Social Science Research Resources Network, CiteULike, Academia.edu, Youtube, Slideshare, Prezi, Scribd, Scivee, Mendeley
  • 24. Additional links and resources! eBiz/MBA – The 15 most popular science sites derived from the web traffic ranks. http://www.ebizmba.com/articles/science-websites Social media for scientists –article series on Scientific American. http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/science-sushi/2011/09/27/social-media-for-scientists-part-1-its-our- job/ Science blogging communities. http://www.science20.com/ and http://scienceblogs.com/ Research Blogging – News about peer-reviewed scientific papers. http://researchblogging.org/ SciVee – Science “youtube”. http://www.scivee.tv/ Wiki on social networking tools for scientists. http://socialnetworkingforscientists.wikispaces.com/General Social media: A guide for researchers. http://www.rin.ac.uk/our-work/communicating-and-disseminating-research/social-media-guide-researchers Shipman, Matt (2012) Scientists: Social Media Is Not Necessarily a Waste of Time. http://www.scilogs.com/communication_breakdown/social-media-not-waste-of-time/