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Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
Probabilities
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Probabilities

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Probabilities at a fifth grade math level

Probabilities at a fifth grade math level

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  • 1. By: Christie Potter BaileyWeaver “88 Kings and Queens” Oct 25, 2009 via Flickr,CreativeCommons Attribution
  • 2. What is a probability? Three major points 1.An experiment (Situation) 2.An outcome (Result) 3.An event (Single Result) Probability= measurement of a single event occurring
  • 3. • 0=NO chance of the probability occurring • In Between = represented with fractions, decimals, & percent • 1=the probability WILL occur 0-1 Probability
  • 4. • Percent: 0-100% probability • Decimal: 0.0-1.0 probability • Fraction: 0/1 - 1/1 probability • Each can be interchangeable Using Fractions, Decimals, & Percent
  • 5. Example: 20% • Fraction  20/100 can be SIMPLIFIED to 1/5 • Decimal  20% DIVDED by 100% = .2 Starting At A Percent
  • 6. Example: ¾ • Percent  ¾ is EQUAL to 75/100 or 75% • Decimal  3 DIVIDED by 4 equals .75 Starting At A Fraction
  • 7. Example: .5 • Percent  .5 MULTIPLIED by 100 = 50% • Fraction  50/100 can be SIMPLIFIED to ½ Starting At A Decimal
  • 8. # of ways event can occur P (A) = total # of possible outcomes Where A = The Event Probability of an Event
  • 9. • IF P (A) > P (B) • THEN A is more likely to occur • IF P(A) = P(B) • THEN P (AB) are equally likely to occur Probability A vs. B
  • 10. Dice Example • Probability (1/6) - for each number 1-6 • 1 = each number on a die (1,2,3,4,5,6) • 6 = total number of sides
  • 11. Continued… We Can Also Say… •Probability of EVEN numbers: •P (3/6) OR  (1/3) •Probability of ODD numbers: •P (3/6) OR  (1/3) Leah Love “Dice Isn’t Just A Game; It’s aWay of Life” Aug 18, 2005 via Flickr,Creative Commons Attribution
  • 12. •P (Yellow) = ¼ •P (Blue) = ¼ •P (Green) = ¼ •P (Red) = ¼ A Spinner Example
  • 13. •Used when drawing from a bag •Take object out without putting back •Carton has 12 eggs •  I take one • 11 are left ProbabilityWithout Replacement
  • 14. • I have 30 pieces •7 are Red •23 are Blue •I’m going to pass them out Jar of Candy Ella Novak “Jar of Candy” Jan 5, 2003 via Flickr,Creative Commons Attribution
  • 15. Creating A ProbabilityTree Candy P (Red) 7/30 P (Blue) 23/30 P (Red) 6/29 P (Blue) 23/29 P (Red) 7/29 P (Blue) 22/29
  • 16. •P (Red, Red) : 7/30 MULTIPLY by 6/29 = 42/870 •P (Red, Blue) : 7/30 MULTIPLY by 23/29 = 161/870 •P (Blue, Blue) : 23/30 MULTIPLY by 22/29 = 506/870 •P (Blue, Red) : 23/30 MULTIPLY by 7/29 = 161/870 The Math
  • 17. •Q: Which is MOST likely to occur? •A: P (Blue, Blue) •Q: Which is LEAST likely to occur? •A: P (Red, Red) •Which are EQUALLY likely to occur? •A: P (Red, Blue) & P (Blue, Red) Q & A

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