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Rochester, Minn., emergency operations plan

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    City of Rochester emergency operations plan City of Rochester emergency operations plan Document Transcript

    • City of Rochester, Minnesota Emergency Operations Plan ft ra D September 14, 2011Fire Department - Emergency Management Division
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan City of Rochester, Minnesota EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLANThe Emergency Operations Plan, consisting of a Basic Plan, Emergency Support Functions, Annexes, and various implementation instructions are an all- hazards approach for use in the event of disaster or severe emergency ofnatural or human-made cause, hostile military or paramilitary action, or similar occurrences resulting from terrorist activities, riots, or civil disorders. Direct questions regarding this document to Greg K. Martin, Emergency Management Director i September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan CONTACT INFORMATION Emergency Management Director Greg K. Martin, Fire Chief 201 4th Street SE City Hall Room 10 Rochester, Minnesota 55901 507-328-2800 gmartin@rochestermn.gov Deputy Emergency Management Director Kenneth E. Jones Emergency Management Division 201 4th Street SE City Hall Room 10 Rochester, Minnesota 55901 507-328-2824 kjones@rochestermn.gov ii September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan EXECUTIVE SUMMARYCity of Rochester developed the Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) to ensure that allemergency management functions of the City be coordinated to the maximum extentpracticable with the comparable functions of the federal government, or state and localgovernments, and of private agencies of every type. Tasks are assigned to the agencies bestsuited to performing such tasks.The EOP describes the City of Rochester authority and approach to a disaster or emergencysituation. It consists of the Basic Plan, Emergency Support Function annexes, SupportingAnnexes, and implementation instructions (emergency policies, procedures, checklists, andthe like). These documents serve to provide general guidance and assign responsibility foremergency and disaster functions.The scope of the Emergency Operations Plan spans the entire Cycle of EmergencyOperations – pre-incident through applying lessons learned, and encompasses early disasterresponse activation as well as long-term community recovery.An interim emergency plan document was created in September 2009 to provide measuresfor emergency disaster coordination. This EOP was completed in September 2011, andserves to fulfill requirements as specified by Minnesota Homeland Security and EmergencyManagement (HSEM) Local Emergency Operations Plan Crosswalk (MNWALK). iii September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan LEGAL AUTHORITY OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMPursuant to Rochester Code of Ordinances Chapter 14A and the Minnesota EmergencyManagement Act of 1996, the City of Rochester, Minnesota Emergency ManagementProgram has been established:“There is established an Office of Emergency Management within the Rochester FireDepartment for the purpose of coordinating all emergency and disaster mitigation,preparedness, response and recovery activities within the City. It shall be staffed by aDeputy Director and other such assistants necessary for the proper functioning of the office.The Mayor shall appoint an Emergency Management Director who shall have responsibilityfor the organization, administration, and operation of the office, subject to the directionand control of the City Administrator and Council. The Emergency Management Directorshall appoint a Deputy Emergency Management Director.” (Rochester Code of Ordinances14A.03, Subd. 1)“Each political subdivision shall establish a local organization for emergencymanagement…must have a director appointed forthwith…responsible for the organization,administration, and operation of the local organization for emergency management, subjectto the direction and control of the local governing body.” (Minn. Stat. § 12.25, Subd. 1)“A county organization for emergency management has jurisdiction throughout the countyoutside of a city or town that has a local emergency management organization.” (Minn.Stat. § 12.25, Subd. 2 (b))“Each local and county organization for emergency management shall perform emergencymanagement functions within the territorial limits of the political subdivision within which itis organized and, in addition, shall conduct these functions outside of its territorial limits asmay be required pursuant to sections 12.23 (Facilities, Utilization), 12.27 (Mutual Aid,Arrangements), and 12.32 (Governor’s Orders and Rules, Effect), or any other applicablelaw” (Minn. Stat. § 12.25, Subd. 3).This Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) describes how emergency management functionswill be performed in the City of Rochester, and the Minnesota Emergency Operations Planstates a local emergency operations plan enables city government to continue to operateand carry out emergency functions, and fulfill the primary responsibility for meeting theimmediate health and safety needs of its citizens in the event of a majordisaster/emergency within the City’s territorial limits. The City of Rochester has elected toopt-out of the Olmsted County EOP. iv September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan CERTIFICATIONLINES OF SUCCESSIONCHIEF ELECTED OFFICIALThe line of succession for the Chief Elected Official during a community wide response to anemergency or disaster situation is: Agency Title of ContactMayor’s Office MayorCommon Council PresidentCity Administration City Administrator ___________________________________________ _________________ Mayor - City of Rochester, Minnesota DateATTEST: __________________________ City Clerk APPROVED THIS _____ DAY OF ______________________, 2011.EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT DIRECTORThe line of succession for the Emergency Management Director during a response to anemergency or disaster situation is: Agency Title of ContactFire Department Fire Chief - Emergency Management DirectorFire Department Deputy Emergency Management DirectorPolice Department Sgt., Deputy Emergency Management DirectorFire Department Fire Marshal, Deputy Emergency Management Director ___________________________________________ _________________ City of Rochester Emergency Management Director Date v September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan ESF PRIMARY AGENCY CERTIFICATION ESF 1 TransportationPrimary Agency: Public WorksPurpose The purpose of Emergency Support Function (ESF) 1, Transportation, is to provide organization, mobilization, coordination and delivery of transportation support and assistance following an incident.Scope 1. The Public Works Department is designated as lead department for coordinating transportation related activities within the City of Rochester. 2. The provision of transportation support includes: • The coordination of transportation activities to supplement the efforts of City departments with each other and other jurisdictions or agencies. • The establishment of appropriate incident notification and priority, mobilization, use, and/or allocation of transportation resources. • The processing of all transportation requests, including: evacuation routes of affected populations, coordination of debris management routes of travel; prioritization of roadway restoration and recovery phase repair work; conducting damage assessments of roads; and coordination with City departments, local jurisdictions, and State and federal agencies.Department Head Signature Title ESF 2 CommunicationsPrimary Agency: PolicePurpose The Communications Emergency Support Function (ESF) is activated when a significant impact to the communications infrastructure is anticipated or has occurred. It is meant to organize, establish and maintain communication capabilities necessary to meet operational requirements of the City of Rochester in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from an incident.Scope 1. The Rochester Police Department Public Safety Communications Center is designated as the lead agency for coordinating communications and warning of events (or pending events). 2. The Communications ESF describes the coordination of actions to be taken to establish and maintain 911 phone systems, computer and information technology infrastructure, ARMER radio system, and telecommunications system (not 911 phones) devices, in preparation for, response to, and recovery from an incident which effects the population and operation of the City of Rochester. 3. Support for this ESF includes: communication and telecommunication services provided under the vi September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan National Security Emergency Preparedness procedures for expediting service requirements covered under the Telecommunications Service Priority program (aka GETS).Department Head Signature Title ESF 3 Public Works and EngineeringPrimary Agency: Public WorksPurpose The purpose of Emergency Support Function (ESF) 3, Public Works and Engineering, is to provide guidance for the emergency coordination of public works and engineering services for debris removal, inspection of public infrastructure for damage and structural safety and for issuing contracts for the demolition of unsafe public infrastructure and the temporary repair of essential infrastructure. ESF 3 includes emergency activities for solid waste, flood management, and surface water.Scope 1. The City of Rochester’s Public Works Department maintains City roadways and bridges including signage and postings, wastewater treatment facilities, public parking ramps and lots, City sanitary sewer collection and storm drainage systems, flood management facilities, as well as providing inspections and permit functions. Public Works coordinates emergency restoration of critical public facilities, including the temporary and permanent restoration of, roads, bridges, wastewater collection and treatment systems. Support includes construction management and inspection, emergency contracting and technical advice, and evaluations. 2. A Public Works representative is sent to the City of Rochester Emergency Operations Center (EOC) upon activation. When requested, other City departments are activated to provide support of personnel, equipment, and/or technical advice. 3. Manage flood control structuresDepartment Head Signature Title ESF 4 FirefightingPrimary Agency: FirePurpose The purpose of Emergency Support Function 4 is to provide for citywide coordination of fire prevention, suppression and control within the City of Rochester. This ESF will also provide for the coordinated use of fire department resources in handling urban, rural and wild land fires, which could result from a natural disaster, such as flood or tornado.Scope 1. This ESF deals with fighting fires beyond normal field operations in the City of Rochester. This includes coordinating resource assistance of other agencies through local mutual aid agreements and vii September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan the statewide Fire Mobilization Plan. 2. The plan establishes a mutual understanding of authority, responsibilities and functions of local government, and provides a basis for incorporating non-governmental organizations (NGOs) into the response and recovery process. All directions contained herein apply to preparedness measures and incident actions undertaken by the City of Rochester and other supporting organizations as may be required to minimize the effects of large scale incidents. 3. The Fire Department is the primary department for all fire service, emergency medical services (EMS) and rescue activities. 4. The City of Rochester Fire Department has five Stations. 5. Firefighting activities involve the: a. Management and coordination of firefighting activities. b. Detection and suppression of fires on City and private property. c. Providing personnel, equipment, and supplies to support the City and other local jurisdictions involved in urban and urban interface firefighting as well as light urban search and rescue operations.Department Head Signature Title ESF 5 Emergency ManagementPrimary Agency: Emergency Management Division (Fire)Purpose The purpose of Emergency Support Function (ESF) 5 provides guidance in ensuring that the City of Rochester is prepared to handle and respond to an emergency, or disaster.Scope 1. This ESF establishes practices and procedures to ensure incident preparedness for the City of Rochester. By understanding Rochester’s hazards, risks, and vulnerabilities, emergency management can prepare a plan that acknowledges them and can train City staff on their roles and responsibilities, and communicate mitigation and preparedness strategies to the general community. 2. The establishment and routine maintenance of the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is a primary responsibility of Emergency Management. Equipping the EOC with reliable communication devices and other tools that support incident response are critical in ensuring incidents can be managed and responded to in an efficient manner.Department Head Signature Title ESF 6 Mass Care, Housing, and Human ServicesPrimary Agency: Emergency Management Division (Fire) viii September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanPurpose The purpose of this Emergency Support Function (ESF) is to coordinate efforts to provide emergency shelter, sleeping areas, feeding, and other relief supplies following an incident. This ESF also supports a mass care shelter system that is responsible for coordinating emergency relief supplies and victim reporting and reunification within the City of Rochester.Scope 1. The City of Rochester Emergency Management Division will work with local non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to facilitate delivery of mass care services within the City of Rochester. 2. The City of Rochester assumes initial coordination of services according to Minnesota Disaster Recovery Assistance Framework in order to provide mass care response and the efforts of other NGOs, including ARC relief operations. American Red Cross and Salvation Army are primary providers of mass care services. 3. Mass Care includes: a. Dormitory Shelters b. Warming/Cooling Centers c. Feeding d. Emergency First Aid e. Bulk Distribution of Emergency Relief ItemsDepartment Head Signature Title ESF 7 Resource SupportPrimary Agency: FinancePurpose The purpose of this Emergency Support Function (ESF) is to provide logistical and resource support during and immediately following an incident. This ESF provides for the effective utilization, prioritization and conservation of resources within the City of Rochester.Scope 1. Emergency Operations Center resource support involves the provision of services, personnel, commodities, and facilities to the City during the response and recovery phases of an incident including, but not limited to: a. Emergency relief supplies b. Office equipment c. Office supplies d. Contracting services e. Incident Facilities f. Transportation services g. Personnel required for the support of emergency activities 2. The Finance/Purchasing Department will manage the identification of outside resources, both through the government and through private sectors. 3. It may become necessary to reallocate how City personnel, equipment, vehicles, materials, and ix September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan facilities are utilized.Department Head Signature Title ESF 8 Public Health and Medical ServicesPrimary Agency: FirePurpose This Emergency Support Function (ESF) provides the City of Rochester coordinated assistance in response to public health and medical care needs. It provides a structure to coordinate emergency medical services/mass medical activities to ensure the safety of life and property.Scope 1. ESF 8 provides assistance in identifying and meeting the health and medical needs of those affected by an incident. The primary support agencies are responsible for coordinating the medical needs of City as well as responding to those with incident related injuries. Support for these responsibilities can be categorized in the following functional areas: • Assessment of health and medical needs • Medical care personnel • Health and medical equipment and supplies • Patient evacuation • Worker health and safety • Public health information • Potable water, wastewater, and solid waste disposal 2. Mass casualties, fatalities, and public health emergencies can either occur during the disaster or following one. The Fire Department will direct and coordinate the provisions of health and medical assistance in coordination with support organizations and agencies relating to mass casualties and fatalities. This ESF discusses overall public health response and recovery, triage, treatment, and the transportation and evacuation of those affected by the incident. Public health functions include protecting the safety of water supplies, assuring adequate sanitation is maintained, assuring the safety of food supplies, providing mortuary services and preventing or controlling epidemics. This ESF outlines the procedures for providing health services.Department Head Signature Title ESF 9 Search and RescuePrimary Agency: FirePurpose x September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan The purpose of this ESF is to provide for the effective utilization of Urban Search and Rescue resources and operations.Scope 1. Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) will be coordinated by the City of Rochester Fire Department.Department Head Signature Title ESF 10 Hazardous MaterialsPrimary Agency: FirePurpose The purpose of this ESF is to designate the City of Rochester’s responsibilities for managing and minimizing exposure to an emergent or potential hazardous material incident, oil spill, or other unanticipated release or spill.Scope 1. This ESF is intended to provide a coordinated response to an actual or potential release of hazardous materials.Department Head Signature Title ESF 11 Agriculture and Natural ResourcesPrimary Agency: Public WorksPurpose This ESF ensures that animal, veterinary, and wildlife issues in an incident are supported. Response actions for the rehabilitation, recovery, and restoration of natural resources are supported by this ESF.Scope 1. ESF-11 includes two primary functions: a. Protection of natural resources i. Includes appropriate response actions to: ii. Conserve, rehabilitate, recover, and restore natural resources. b. Animal welfare and sheltering, animal and plant disease, and pest response i. Includes implementing an integrated local, State, federal and tribal response to an outbreak of a highly contagious or economically devastating animal/zoonotic xi September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan disease, an outbreak of a highly infective exotic plant disease, or an economically devastating plant pest an incident are supported.Department Head Signature Title ESF 12 EnergyPrimary Agency: Rochester Public Utilities (RPU)Purpose The primary and support organizations of ESF 12 coordinate with energy and related private and governmental organizations to provide information for assessment, response, and recovery operations related to natural gas supply, power outages, and capacity shortages that may impact Rochester citizens during an event.Scope 1. Depending on the magnitude and extent of the incident, the following may occur: 2. Communication and coordination between the City and RPU to assess energy system damage, energy supply, and energy demand. 3. Determination with businesses that provide/offer such products of fuel needed for emergency operations. 4. Relaying of information and guidance on energy conservation.Department Head Signature Title ESF 13 Public Safety, Law Enforcement, SecurityPrimary Agency: PolicePurpose Emergency Support Function 13 is meant to coordinate the use of law enforcement personnel and equipment in a large-scale incident.Scope 1. Effective law enforcement is essential during large-scale incidents to insure the protection of lives and property. The Rochester Police Department is responsible for the enforcement of laws, traffic control, investigation of crimes and other public safety activities within the City. Rochester has the capability and resources to meet routine law enforcement needs however, during a large-scale incident problems may be multiplied, more complex, and could rapidly tax the capability and xii September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan resources of the City.Department Head Signature Title ESF 14 Long-Term Community RecoveryPrimary Agency: City AdministrationPurpose The purpose of this Emergency Support Function (ESF) is to establish uniform policies for effective coordination in accomplishing recovery and restoration tasks resulting from a significant event. The goals of recovery efforts are to restore City capabilities while also making it more resilient.Scope 1. Recovery and restoration actions begin upon initiation of response actions and will be determined by the specific event. Several local, State, and federal jurisdictions may be involved depending on the hazard and scope of the situation. The City of Rochester is responsible for leading its own recovery efforts.Department Head Signature Title ESF 15 External AffairsPrimary Agency: Emergency Management Division (Fire)Purpose The purpose ESF 15 External Affairs is to provide timely, accurate, coordinated, and accessible information and instruction for the public, media, government agencies, and community response partners.Scope 1. Early disaster intervention can lessen the effects of hazards in many situations. Emergency public information actions before, during, and following any emergency provides a means to implement protective measures. 2. Provide early and updated information to Community Notification Partners 3. Provide citizen alert and notification via early hazard warning systems (e.g. sirens) and mass notification systems (e.g. Rochester-Alert) 4. Provide public information management in complex emergencies and disasters at the Emergency Operations Center (EOC), in order to coordinate the delivery of disaster response messages, and control rumors through reliable and authoritative information xiii September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanDepartment Head Signature Title Continuity of Government/Continuity of Operations PlanPrimary Agency: City AdministrationPurpose The purpose ESF 15 External Affairs is to provide timely, accurate, coordinated, and accessible information and instruction for the public, media, government agencies, and community response partners.Scope 1. Early disaster intervention can lessen the effects of hazards in many situations. Emergency public information actions before, during, and following any emergency provides a means to implement protective measures. 2. Provide early and updated information to Community Notification Partners 3. Provide citizen alert and notification via early hazard warning systems (e.g. sirens) and mass notification systems (e.g. Rochester-Alert) 4. Provide public information management in complex emergencies and disasters at the Emergency Operations Center (EOC), in order to coordinate the delivery of disaster response messages, and control rumors through reliable and authoritative informationDepartment Head Signature Title Damage Assessment AnnexPrimary Agency: Building SafetyPurpose The purpose ESF 15 External Affairs is to provide timely, accurate, coordinated, and accessible information and instruction for the public, media, government agencies, and community response partners.Scope 1. Early disaster intervention can lessen the effects of hazards in many situations. Emergency public information actions before, during, and following any emergency provides a means to implement protective measures. 2. Provide early and updated information to Community Notification Partners 3. Provide citizen alert and notification via early hazard warning systems (e.g. sirens) and mass notification systems (e.g. Rochester-Alert) 4. Provide public information management in complex emergencies and disasters at the Emergency Operations Center (EOC), in order to coordinate the delivery of disaster response messages, and xiv September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan control rumors through reliable and authoritative informationDepartment Head Signature Title Debris Management AnnexPrimary Agency: Public Works/Parks and RecreationPurpose The purpose ESF 15 External Affairs is to provide timely, accurate, coordinated, and accessible information and instruction for the public, media, government agencies, and community response partners.Scope 1. Early disaster intervention can lessen the effects of hazards in many situations. Emergency public information actions before, during, and following any emergency provides a means to implement protective measures. 2. Provide early and updated information to Community Notification Partners 3. Provide citizen alert and notification via early hazard warning systems (e.g. sirens) and mass notification systems (e.g. Rochester-Alert) 4. Provide public information management in complex emergencies and disasters at the Emergency Operations Center (EOC), in order to coordinate the delivery of disaster response messages, and control rumors through reliable and authoritative informationDepartment Head Signature Title Donations ManagementPrimary Agency: FinancePurpose The purpose ESF 15 External Affairs is to provide timely, accurate, coordinated, and accessible information and instruction for the public, media, government agencies, and community response partners.Scope 1. Early disaster intervention can lessen the effects of hazards in many situations. Emergency public information actions before, during, and following any emergency provides a means to implement protective measures. 2. Provide early and updated information to Community Notification Partners 3. Provide citizen alert and notification via early hazard warning systems (e.g. sirens) and mass notification systems (e.g. Rochester-Alert) 4. Provide public information management in complex emergencies and disasters at the Emergency xv September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Operations Center (EOC), in order to coordinate the delivery of disaster response messages, and control rumors through reliable and authoritative informationDepartment Head Signature Title Volunteer ManagementPrimary Agency: Human ResourcesPurpose The purpose ESF 15 External Affairs is to provide timely, accurate, coordinated, and accessible information and instruction for the public, media, government agencies, and community response partners.Scope 1. Early disaster intervention can lessen the effects of hazards in many situations. Emergency public information actions before, during, and following any emergency provides a means to implement protective measures. 2. Provide early and updated information to Community Notification Partners 3. Provide citizen alert and notification via early hazard warning systems (e.g. sirens) and mass notification systems (e.g. Rochester-Alert) 4. Provide public information management in complex emergencies and disasters at the Emergency Operations Center (EOC), in order to coordinate the delivery of disaster response messages, and control rumors through reliable and authoritative informationDepartment Head Signature Title xvi September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN (EOP) COORDINATION Planning Team MembershipBasic Plan Emergency Management Ken Jones, Deputy Director EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION (ESF) ANNEXESESF 1: Transportation Public Works Department Tony KnauerESF 2: Communications PSCC - Police Department Gary MulleneauxESF 3: Public Works and Public Works Department Richard FreeseEngineeringESF 4: Firefighting Fire Department Brennan KellyESF 5: Emergency Emergency Management Ken JonesManagementESF 6: Mass Care, Emergency Emergency Management Ken JonesAssistance, Housing, andHuman ServicesESF 7: Resource Support Emergency Management Ken JonesESF 8: Public Health and Emergency Management Ken JonesMedical ServicesESF 9: Search and Rescue Fire Department David Worstman and Chris BaileyESF 10: Hazardous Materials Fire Department Kris Jungels and Mike JacobsonESF 11: Agriculture and Natural Emergency Management Ken JonesResourcesESF 12: Energy Rochester Public Utilities Mark KotschevarESF 13: Public Safety Police Department Scott TuliusESF 14: Long-Term Community City Administration Stevan KvenvoldRecoveryESF 15: External Affairs Emergency Management Ken Jones ANNEXES to EOPContinuity of Emergency Management Ken JonesGovernment/Continuity of Human Resources Perry BuffingtonOperations PlanDamage Assessment Building Safety Department Tim SaariDebris Management Park and Recreation Department Dennis StolzDonations Management Finance Department Rachel HoudekVolunteer Management Human Resources Department Linda HillenbrandCity of Rochester Emergency Management Director (or Deputy Director) is ultimately responsiblefor coordinating and maintaining ESF/Annexes of the City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan SIGNATURE DATE xvii September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan REVISIONS Section Creation Date Revision Date InitialsIntroductory/Promulgation September 2011Basic Plan September 2011ESF 1: Transportation September 2011ESF 2: Communications September 2011ESF 3: Public Works and September 2011EngineeringESF 4: Firefighting September 2011ESF 5: Emergency September 2011ManagementESF 6: Mass Care, Housing, September 2011and Human ServicesESF 7: Resource Support September 2011ESF 8: Public Health and September 2011Medical ServicesESF 9: Search and Rescue September 2011ESF 10: Hazardous Materials September 2011ESF 11: Agriculture and September 2011Natural ResourcesESF 12: Energy September 2011ESF 13: Public Safety September 2011ESF 14: Long-Term September 2011Community RecoveryESF 15: External Affairs September 2011Continuity of Government & September 2011Operations Plan (COG/COOP)Damage Assessment Annex September 2011Debris Management Annex September 2011Donations Management September 2011AnnexVolunteer Management September 2011Annex xviii September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan PLAN DISTRIBUTION Agency Distribution DateBuilding Safety Department September 2011City Administration September 2011City Attorney’s Office September 2011City Clerk’s Office September 2011Finance Department September 2011Fire Department September 2011Human Resources Department September 2011Information Systems Division September 2011Library September 2011Mayo Civic Center September 2011Mayor and Council September 2011Music September 2011Park and Recreation September 2011Police Department September 2011Public Works September 2011Rochester-Olmsted Planning Department September 2011Rochester Public Utilities September 2011Rochester International Airport (RST) September 2011 xix September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan PRIMARY and SUPPORTING AGENCIES MATRIX ESF 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Annexes Resource Support Donations Mgmt. Volunteer Mgmt. Medical Services Search & Rescue Communications Damage Assess. External Affairs Nat. Resources Transportation Public Works Agriculture & Debris Mgmt. Public SafetyDepartment/ Management COG/COOP Firefighting Long-Term Emergency Mass Care Agency Haz-Mat Recover EnergyBuildingSafety S S S PDepartmentCity S S P PAdministrationCityAttorney’s S SOfficeCity Clerk’sOffice S S SFinance S P S S PFire S S P P P S P P P S S S P S S SHumanResources S S S S S PDepartmentInformationSystems S S S S S S SDivisionLibrary S S SMayo CivicCenter S SMayor andCouncil S SMusic S SPark andRecreation S S S S S S S SPolice S P S S S S S S P P S SPublic Works P P S S S S S S S PRochester-OlmstedPlanning S S S SDepartmentRochesterPublicUtilities S S S S P S(RPU)RochesterInternational S SAirport (RST)VOAD S S S S S xx September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester, Minnesota BASIC PLAN This section describes the basic disaster response plan of the City of Rochester, Minnesota. The Basic Plan lays the foundation for legal authority and describesthe general duties and responsibilities of the Mayor and Emergency Management Director, and the disaster relief force.
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan TABLE OF CONTENTS1 Introductory/Promulgation Documents ...................................................................................................... Contact Information.................................................................................................................................. ii Executive Summary.................................................................................................................................. iii Legal Authority ......................................................................................................................................... iv Certification............................................................................................................................................... v ESF Primary Agency Certification ............................................................................................................. vi Emergency Operations Plan Coordination............................................................................................. xvii Revisions ............................................................................................................................................... xviii Plan Distribution ..................................................................................................................................... xix Primary and Supporting Agencies Matrix ................................................................................................xxTable of Contents .......................................................................................................................................... 22 Purpose and Scope of the Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) .................................................................. 5 2.1 Definition of Disaster .......................................................................................................................... 5 2.2 Purpose ............................................................................................................................................... 5 2.3 Scope ................................................................................................................................................... 63 Planning Overview ..................................................................................................................................... 6 3.1 Integrated Approach to Emergency Planning ..................................................................................... 6 3.2 Comprehensive Approach to Emergency Planning............................................................................. 7 3.3 Plan Assumptions ................................................................................................................................ 7 3.4 Organization of Emergency Operations Plan ...................................................................................... 8 3.5 Primary and Support Departments and Agencies .............................................................................. 84 Policies ....................................................................................................................................................... 9 4.1 Legal References ................................................................................................................................. 9 4.2 Establishment of Emergency Management Program ....................................................................... 10 4.3 Local State of Emergency and Limits of Emergency Authority ......................................................... 10 4.4 Implement the Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) ........................................................................... 10 4.5 Delegation of Emergency Authority.................................................................................................. 10 4.6 NIMS Resolution................................................................................................................................ 11 4.7 Intrastate Mutual Aid ........................................................................................................................ 11 4.8 Document Preservation and Retention ............................................................................................ 12 Basic Plan - 2 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan5 Situation ................................................................................................................................................... 13 5.1 Mission .............................................................................................................................................. 13 5.2 Service Area ...................................................................................................................................... 13 5.3 Services ............................................................................................................................................. 13 5.4 Organization ...................................................................................................................................... 13 5.5 Management ..................................................................................................................................... 13 5.6 Personnel .......................................................................................................................................... 14 5.7 Facilities and Equipment ................................................................................................................... 14 5.8 External Affairs and Relations ........................................................................................................... 146 Concept of Operations ............................................................................................................................. 15 6.1 Early Intervention is Vital to Success ................................................................................................ 15 6.2 Emergency Management is a Continuous Process: Cycle of Emergency Operations ...................... 15 6.3 Activities Within the Cycle of Emergency Operations ...................................................................... 16 6.4 Situational Awareness....................................................................................................................... 177 Organization and Assignment of Responsibilities .................................................................................... 17 7.1 Duties and Powers of the Mayor ...................................................................................................... 17 7.2 Duties and Authority of Emergency Management Director ............................................................. 18 7.3 Definition of Relief Force and Duties of City Employees .................................................................. 19 7.4 Emergency Operations Plan .............................................................................................................. 19 7.5 Duties of City Department Liaison .................................................................................................... 20 7.6 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Center Staffing ................................................................ 208 Direction and Control ............................................................................................................................... 21 8.1 Legal Authority .................................................................................................................................. 21 8.2 Direction and Control of Emergency Operations Center (EOC) ........................................................ 22 8.3 Direction and Control of Disaster Responders.................................................................................. 22 8.4 Reassignment of City Employee Duties ............................................................................................ 23 8.5 Interface with State of Minnesota Homeland Security and Emergency Management .................... 23 8.6 Role of Public Health ......................................................................................................................... 24 8.7 Volunteers and agencies ................................................................................................................... 25 8.8 Private sector .................................................................................................................................... 25 8.9 Liability .............................................................................................................................................. 25 Basic Plan - 3 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan9 Checking and Corrective Action ............................................................................................................... 26 9.1 After Action Review .......................................................................................................................... 2610 Plan Development and Maintenance .................................................................................................... 26 10.1 Assignments and Responsibilities ................................................................................................... 26 10.2 Capability Assessment .................................................................................................................... 26 10.3 State of Minnesota Planning Requirements ................................................................................... 2711 References ............................................................................................................................................. 28 11.1 Attachments and Supporting Documents....................................................................................... 28 11.2 Plan Writing References.................................................................................................................. 2812 Appendix A - Emergency Management Program................................................................................... 30 12.1 Community Profile .......................................................................................................................... 30 12.2 Hazard Profile.................................................................................................................................. 32 12.3 Characteristics of Effective Emergency Management Organizational Structures .......................... 33 12.4 Strategy, Goals, Objectives ............................................................................................................. 34 12.5 Public Education.............................................................................................................................. 3413 Appendix B - Training, Awareness and Competence ............................................................................. 35 13.1 City of Rochester Training Requirements ....................................................................................... 35 13.2 State of Minnesota Training Requirements .................................................................................... 35 13.3 National Incident Management System Training ........................................................................... 3614 Appendix C – Exercise Program ............................................................................................................. 38 14.1 Purpose ........................................................................................................................................... 38 14.2 Policy ............................................................................................................................................... 38 14.3 State of MN requirements .............................................................................................................. 38 14.4 Capability Based Exercises .............................................................................................................. 39 14.5 Type of Exercises ............................................................................................................................. 40 14.6 HSEEP Exercise Program Management........................................................................................... 41 14.7 Required Exercises .......................................................................................................................... 4215 Appendix D - State of Minnesota Emergency Management Act ........................................................... 43 15.1 State of Minnesota Emergency Management Act of 1996 (excerpts)............................................ 43 Basic Plan - 4 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan1 Introductory/Promulgation Documents The documents on the pages preceding the Table of Contents declare official statements as required by HSEM Local Emergency Operations Plan Crosswalk (MNWALK) Version 3.3, and/or as suggested by FEMA Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 101 Version 2.2 Purpose and Scope of the Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) 2.1 Definition of Disaster As defined by Ordinance Chapter 14A of the Rochester Code of Ordinances: Disaster means an occurrence or threat of widespread or severe damage, injury or loss of life or property resulting from any natural or human-made cause, including but not limited to, fire, flood, snowstorm, ice storm, tornado, windstorm, oil spill, water contamination, utility failure, hazardous peacetime radiological incident, major transportation accident, hazardous materials incident, epidemic, pandemic, air contamination, blight, drought, infestation, explosion, or hostile military or paramilitary action, or similar occurrences resulting form terrorist activities, riots, or civil disorders. Disasters v Emergency Response: A disaster is a crisis event that transcends the normal emergency response. Disasters are different in four unique ways: 1) Coordination of many emergency responders and extra “outside” agencies; 2) Responders perform limited, specific tasks or assume non-traditional roles; 3) Different performance standards are applied; 4) Public/private interface is highly interactive and absolutely vital to a successful disaster response (Quarantelli, 2006). 2.2 Purpose The Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) seeks to prepare the City of Rochester for a disaster. The purpose of the Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) is to ensure that all emergency management functions of the City be coordinated to the maximum extent practicable with the comparable functions of the federal government, of state and local governments, and of private agencies of every type. It accomplishes this by: • Describing how the City will respond to disasters • Outlines actions to prevent, prepare, and recover from disasters • Uses Emergency Support Functions (ESF), Annexes, and implementation instructions to convert this plan into action steps • Enables the City to be eligible for Emergency Management Program Grant (EMPG) assistance and other non-disaster funding Basic Plan - 5 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 2.3 Scope The scope of the Emergency Operations Plan spans the Cycle of Emergency Operations – pre-incident through applying lessons learned, and encompasses early disaster response activation into long-term community recovery. Why is early disaster response desired? Routine (minor) emergencies are handled every day by City departments and response organizations, and these functions are managed independently of other emergency management coordination. When complex (major) emergencies occur, emergency management operations may be needed to assist in coordination and support. Disasters require an integration of departments and response organizations for effective disaster response, and are different from simple emergencies. While disasters may start as a sudden, devastating event, they may begin as a smaller incident and continue to grow beyond the scope of normal emergency response. The EOP considers both sudden and slow-onset disasters. Early disaster activation enables the City to get ahead of the event to improve disaster management. And, continuing emergency management operations beyond the crisis phase of the event enables the City to recover, prevent/mitigate future crises, and prepare for the next event.3 Planning Overview 3.1 Integrated Approach to Emergency Planning All disasters are local and should be managed at the lowest jurisdictional level, and at the lowest level within the jurisdiction, in accordance with Minnesota State law and Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM) policy: • Minnesota Statutes Chapter 12 defines the local jurisdiction authority, mission, and roles performed by local jurisdictions • As defined by Minnesota State Statutes Chapter 12, City of Rochester is the local government emergency management jurisdiction responsible for prevention/mitigation activities, preparedness, response coordination, and recovery operations within the city limits • City of Rochester Ordinance Chapter 14A defines the scope of emergency management authorities, roles and responsibilities • City of Rochester develops collaborative partnerships with agencies and groups who provide disaster-related services and utilizes these services to accomplish the emergency management mission defined by state and local statutes • City of Rochester will use City resources available before seeking mutual aid • City of Rochester will seek mutual aid from partners before seeking additional resources from the State of Minnesota Basic Plan - 6 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan • City of Rochester plays a regional role in providing emergency resources in both response and recovery missions, and will provide mutual aid per signed agreements or as requested by the State Emergency Operations Center (EOC) via Mn Duty Officer3.2 Comprehensive Approach to Emergency PlanningAll disasters are local and require a comprehensive approach to emergency management: • Seek the involvement of all who are engaged in disaster management and develop effective partnerships so all can achieve our mission • Understand true disasters are few and far between and seek to hone disaster skills by frequent Emergency Operations Center (EOC) activation to emergency responses - small and large • Maintain awareness of hazards and seek to prevent and mitigate (minimize) effects of recognized hazards • It is crucial to leave room for emergence as new hazards may become evident and require an unanticipated response • Develop a culture of preparedness for our responders, our citizens, and our community • Build the capability to respond to any emergency, including the ability to warn the public of impending harm • Aim to match actions during emergency response to words used in emergency planning • Learning is a continuous process and seek continuous improvement through lessons learned and application of best practices3.3 Plan Assumptions • People desire to be self-sufficient - emergency management efforts are directed toward enabling and empowering individuals and groups to take care of themselves by providing or restoring essential services • People who are prepared for emergencies and disasters will be able to take care of themselves • Special population may need extra help • Community emergency response organizations exist to help those affected by the disaster or emergency • Shelters, mass feeding, and other disaster services will be pre-planned and available • The Emergency Operations Center (EOC) will coordinate services by working with response agencies/organizations to provide services effectively • Resources for first responders and other providers will be coordinated through the EOC • Public warning systems will be working and available • Adequate budgetary funding will exist to support the emergency management program Basic Plan - 7 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan3.4 Organization of Emergency Operations PlanBasic Plan. The Basic Plan describes the planning environment, authority for emergencyactions, purpose and scope, concept of operations, assignments, and method of managingthe disaster. Appendices to the Basic Plan provides information to explain the overallemergency management program.Emergency Support Function (ESF) Annexes. The Emergency Support Functions identifythe primary and support agencies who provide vital emergency actions, discusses the fullrange of actions in each phase of emergency management, identifies policies and logisticalsupport, and establishes a means of communication between disaster responders. Thefederal emergency support function model is used for ESF 1 - 15.Annexes are used to supplement the Basic Plan and ESF Annexes, and describe essentialfunctions provided in disaster response.List of Annexes 1. ESF 1: Transportation 2. ESF 2: Communications 3. ESF 3: Public Works and Engineering 4. ESF 4: Firefighting 5. ESF 5: Emergency Management 6. ESF 6: Mass Care, Housing, and Human Services 7. ESF 7: Resource Support 8. ESF 8: Public Health and Medical Services 9. ESF 9: Search and Rescue 10. ESF 10: Hazardous Materials 11. ESF 11: Agriculture and Natural Resources 12. ESF 12: Energy 13. ESF 13: Public Safety 14. ESF 14: Long-Term Community Recovery 15. ESF 15: External Affairs 16. Continuity of Government (COG)/Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP) 17. Damage Assessment Annex 18. Debris Management Annex 19. Donations Management Annex 20. Volunteer Management Annex3.5 Primary and Support Departments and AgenciesSee Foreword for overview of ESF, primary and supporting agencies responsibilities Basic Plan - 8 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan4 Policies 4.1 Legal References City of Rochester Ordinance Chapter 14A Emergency Management provides the statement of legislative purpose and intent, and is the basis for the Emergency Operations Plan. Minnesota Statutes, Chapter 12, as amended (“The Minnesota Emergency Management Act of 1996”) stipulate that HSEM “...shall coordinate the development and maintenance of emergency operations plans and emergency management programs by the political subdivisions of this state, with the plans and programs integrated into and coordinated with the emergency operations plan and emergency management program of this state to the fullest possible extent.” Also, see section 11.2 for additional excerpts. Minnesota Statutes, Section 299J, as amended. (The Minnesota Pipeline Safety Act): Minnesota State Fire Marshal, Office of Pipeline Safety, Section 299J.10, requires a county or home rule charter city having a pipeline (as defined in the statute) within its jurisdiction to prepare an emergency operations plan and supporting documentation that will include appropriate pipeline safety information. “The format and content of the plan... must be in agreement with the guidance and prototype planning documents provided by HSEM.” Minnesota Statutes, Section 299K.01 (The Minnesota Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act), Section 299K.05, stipulates that “Political subdivisions should prepare emergency plans that adequately address the requirements contained in ... the federal act.” The “federal act” is the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act, otherwise known as Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. SARA Title III includes several requirements regarding the development, exercising, and updating of a local emergency plan. Minnesota Statutes, Section 103F, Subdivision 3. (Emergency Flood Protection Measures): Minnesota Department of Natural Resources: Minnesota Statutes, Section 103F.155, requires communities having emergency flood measures (levees) to develop a plan adequate to provide protection in the event of levee failure (See ESF 11 Natural Resources). Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, Public Law 93-288, as amended, 42 U.S.C. 5121-5207, and Related Authorities FEMA 592, June 2007, relates the ability for local jurisdictions to receive Hazard Mitigation funds, receive federal resources, and outlines eligibility for disaster relief assistance. Basic Plan - 9 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan4.2 Establishment of Emergency Management ProgramCity of Rochester is recognized as an emergency management program under the MinnesotaChapter 12 as amended and augmented by City of Rochester Ordinance 3956, Chapter14A: There is established a department of Emergency Management within the Rochester Fire Department for the purpose of coordinating all emergency and disaster mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery activities within the City. The Director and Deputy Director of Emergency Management shall have responsibility for the organization, administration, and operation of the office, subject to the direction and control of the City Administrator and Common Council.4.3 Local State of Emergency and Limits of Emergency AuthorityCity of Rochester Emergency Management Ordinance Chapter 14A When circumstances within the property governed by City of Rochester indicate that the occurrence or threat of occurrence of widespread or severe damage, injury or loss of life or property exists, the Mayor, or designee, may declare a local state of emergency. Such a declaration shall be forwarded to Common Council, and be promptly filed with the City Clerk, and given prompt general publicity. This declaration shall not be continued or renewed for a period in excess of 3 days except with the consent of the Common Council. If the Mayor, or designee, invokes such power and authority, he/she shall, as soon as reasonably expedient, convene the Common Council for one or more emergency meetings in accordance with the open meetings act to perform its normal governing duties as the situation demands, and will report to that body relative to emergency activeness. Nothing in this policy shall be construed as abridging or curtailing the powers of the Common Council unless specifically provided herein.4.4 Implement the Emergency Operations Plan (EOP)14A.05, Subd. 3. Mayor may do one or more of the following powers under a local state of emergency: Direct the Emergency Management Director or Deputy Director to implement the Emergency Operations Plan.4.5 Delegation of Emergency AuthorityCity of Rochester Emergency Management Ordinance Chapter 14A Basic Plan - 10 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan During the temporary absence of the Mayor from the City or the inability of the Mayor to perform the duties of the office, the designee shall act in his/her place for the purpose of performing emergency duties of the Mayor. The designee shall be the President of Common Council. The Mayor shall designate, in writing, the name(s) and title(s) of the designee(s). This designation shall be considered permanent, unless rescinded by letter to the designee(s) and the Emergency Management Director.Line of Succession for Emergency Management Director 1. Deputy Emergency Management Director 2. Acting Deputy Emergency Management DirectorsLine of Succession for Mayor 1. President of Common Council 2. City Administrator4.6 NIMS ResolutionAs approved by Common Council on October 3, 2005, the City of Rochester will utilize theNational Incident Management System (NIMS) as the standard for all incident management.4.7 Intrastate Mutual AidAs approved by Common Council on October 3, 2005, the City of Rochester promotes theefficiency and effectiveness of intrastate mutual aid by designating the City Administrator,Chief of Police, Fire Chief, Public Works Director, and other officer who, exercising discretionand considering the needs of the political subdivision and its inhabitants, to dispatchequipment and personnel as considered necessary if a danger of fire, hazard, casualty, andanother similar occurrence exists outside the political subdivision and by its suddenness itwould be impractical for the governing body of the City of Rochester itself to authorize thedispatch of equipment and personnel to combat that emergency or disaster.Further, Chapter 14A authorizes the Emergency Management Director, assisted by theDeputy Emergency Management Director shall accomplish the standards of emergencymanagement and assist in the development of mutual aid agreements, which may bereviewed by Common Council.See Minnesota Emergency Management Act of 1996, Chapter 12.27 and 12.33 (Referencessection) for additional guidance. Basic Plan - 11 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan4.8 Document Preservation and RetentionVital Files, Records, and Databases: Vital records are documents, references, and records,regardless of media type, that are needed to support essential functions of government. Allvital records must be protected from damage or destruction based.Vital records are either permanent or possess an expiration date based on the GeneralRecords Retention Schedule for Minnesota Cities (March 2008). Records are kept in papercopy and stored in each respective department. City of Rochester maintains databases andother references supporting the essential functions are available through a backup processusing the AS 400 system. Excess storage is handled using per the City of RochesterProcedures for Storage & Retention of Hard Copy Records (June 2011). Paper recordspossessing an expiration date are destroyed by incineration after the expiration date.Electronic records are stored in perpetuity on CD. Basic Plan - 12 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan5 Situation 5.1 Mission City of Rochester has the primary responsibility for meeting the immediate health and safety needs of its citizens in the event of a major emergency/disaster (MEOP, BP-11), and will provide initial emergency response and coordination for citizens when a complex emergency/disaster occurs. 5.2 Service Area City of Rochester city limits and boundaries, and will provide assistance to SE Minnesota as requested 5.3 Services City of Rochester will provide functions outlined in the Basic Plan and Annexes, and "include... without limitation, firefighting services, police services, medical and health services, rescue, engineering, communications and warning services, radiological/chemical and other special weapons defense, evacuation of persons from stricken areas, emergency human services, emergency transportation, existing or properly assigned functions of plant protection, temporary restoration of public utility services, implementation of energy supply, emergency conservation and allocation measures, and other functions related to civilian protection, together with all other activities necessary or incidental to preparing for and carrying out these functions" (Minn. Stat. § 12.03, Subd. 4) 5.4 Organization All city departments have a role in emergency planning and preparedness efforts, as well as emergency planners across all disciplines. Organization of emergency field response will follow agency lines, and when needed will organize under the Incident Management System model. Organization of the City Emergency Operations Center (EOC) will follow the Incident Management System model. 5.5 Management It is essential to assure leadership continuity in elected officials and within emergency management, and the Basic Plan addresses this need. Basic Plan - 13 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Management of emergency field responders (police, fire, medical, public works, parks, energy, volunteers, and the like) will align with principles of the National Incident Management System Management of the Emergency Operations Center will align with principles of the National Incident Management System A mechanism for feedback is provided by the After Action Review (AAR) process, and is viewed as a critical component to assure continuous learning It is important to maintain emergency work satisfaction and the AAR process, incident management process, and "servant leadership" engagement process of emergency response management and planning seeks to achieve work satisfaction5.6 Personnel Emergency field response personnel will continue to function as assigned, and will operate as one unit when required (under Incident Management System). Emergency Operations Center will be staffed with city employees and key external staff members (medical, volunteer, and the like) to accomplish the mission required by the complex emergency/disaster. Rather than seeking only executive staff, it is vital to assign the right people for right jobs, regardless of rank or status during routine operations. These personnel will be provided training to develop skills in emergency management tools & practices.5.7 Facilities and Equipment Facilities, equipment, tools and supplies will be utilized for disaster response The primary Emergency Operations Center is located at City Hall, and the secondary facility is located at Public Works Street Maintenance Garage located on East River Parkway5.8 External Affairs and Relations Speak as one in times of disaster – joint public information component between all organizations, institutions, and agencies Develop not just cooperative partnerships, but also collaborative relationships, and treat partners with mutual respect Strive to ensure entire system working together Basic Plan - 14 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan6 Concept of Operations 6.1 Early Intervention is Vital to Success Emergency management is a continuous process. Some disasters are immediate and others start as a series of small emergencies and build to full response activity. Early intervention is a useful means to get ahead of many disasters. The City of Rochester emergency management Concept of Operations puts the principle of early intervention into practice. Minor emergencies are handled daily by response organizations. When many emergencies overwhelm the system, emergency operations coordination provides support and resources, and other items. The EOC Duty Officer maintains situational awareness 24/7 to promote early EOC activation and emergency management intervention. 6.2 Emergency Management is a Continuous Process: Cycle of Emergency Operations Basic Plan - 15 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan6.3 Activities Within the Cycle of Emergency Operations Basic Plan - 16 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 6.4 Situational Awareness The success of early intervention hinges on good information collection (situational awareness) and dissemination to key groups for their awareness. The emergency management EOC Duty Officer position provides 24/7 situational awareness of hazardous conditions (natural hazards, such as weather; technological hazards, such as chemical release; and civil disturbances, such as terrorism related information). Methods of Receiving Situational Awareness • Word of mouth from reliable sources • National Weather Service information feeds • 911 Dispatch (Public Safety Answering Point - PSAP) • Deliberate reconnaissance • Information vetting and confirmation • Information flow from emergency management partners • During events, information from Incident Command flows to Operations and is relayed to EOC Command Team. DLAN provides a Situation Status Board to keep all EOC Sections aware of current events. DLAN Watch Command is the entry portal for incident messages7 Organization and Assignment of Responsibilities 7.1 Duties and Powers of the Mayor Local State of Emergency. Ordinance Chapter 14A: When circumstances with the City indicate that the occurrence or threat of occurrence of widespread or severe damage, injury or loss of life or property exists, the Mayor may declare a local state of emergency. Powers under Local State of Emergency. Ordinance Chapter 14A: The Mayor may do one or more of the following under a City state of emergency: • Direct the Emergency Management Director to implement the Emergency Operations Plan. • Relieve City employees of normal duties and temporarily reassign them to other duties. • Direct the overall disaster relief effort, including the disaster relief force, in accordance with the Emergency Operations Plan. • Notify employees, students, and the public to recommend in-place shelter or evacuation protective measures. Basic Plan - 17 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan • Request a state of disaster or emergency declaration from the governor.When obtaining normal approvals would result in further injury or damage, the Mayor may,until the City Council convenes, waive procedures and formalities otherwise requiredpertaining to the following: • For a period of up to 3 days appropriate and expend funds. • For a period of up to 3 days make contracts, obtain and distribute equipment, materials, and supplies for disaster purposes • Employ temporary workers. • Purchase and distribute supplies, materials, and equipment.7.2 Duties and Authority of Emergency Management DirectorAuthority. As outlined in Ordinance Chapter 14A: “The Emergency Management Director shall act for and at the direction of the City Administrator and Mayor in the Operations of activities during times of major emergencies and disasters.”Emergency Management Division. The administrative offices for the EmergencyManagement are in Rochester Fire Department (RFD) Administration, 201 4th Street SE #10,Rochester, Minnesota 55904.Duties. Ordinance 3956, Chapter 14 A addresses direction and control duties: “Oversee the implementation of all functions necessary during an emergency or disaster in accordance with the Emergency Operations Plan. “Coordinate city emergency management activities with those of the county, state and adjacent jurisdictions.”The Emergency Management Director and Deputy Director will act at the direction of theMayor in the coordination of activities during times of major emergencies and disasters.The Emergency Management Director shall comply with the standards and requirements asestablished by the MN Homeland Security and Emergency Management Division, under theauthority of the act in accomplishing the following: • Direct and coordinate the development of City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan, which shall be consistent in content with the Minnesota Emergency Management Plan. • Specify divisions or departments which must provide an annex to the plan or otherwise cooperate in its development. Basic Plan - 18 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan • Identify departments and personnel to be included in the emergency operations plan as the disaster relief force. • Coordinate the development and maintenance of a City resource manual. • Coordinate the recruitment and utilization of volunteer personnel to augment City resources for emergency management purposes. • Assure the Emergency Management Program meets eligibility requirements for state and federal aid. • Coordinate and/or conduct training and exercise programs for the disaster relief force within the City and to test the adequacy of the Emergency Operations Plan. • Through public information programs, educate the employees and students as to actions necessary for the protection of life and property in an emergency or disaster. • Oversee the implementation of all functions necessary during an emergency or disaster in accordance with the Emergency Operations Plan. • Coordinate the City emergency management activities with those of the township, county, state and adjacent jurisdictions, as applicable to the circumstances. • Coordinate all emergency preparedness activities, including maintaining primary and alternate emergency operations centers. • Identify mitigation opportunities within the City and encourage departments/divisions to implement mitigation measures.The Emergency Management Director and Deputy Director shall supervise the activities andplan of the Emergency Management function on a continuous basis. With the advice andconsent of the City Administrator, he/she shall formulate, review and approve policy andoperational guidelines for this department as needed.7.3 Definition of Relief Force and Duties of City EmployeesCity of Rochester Emergency Management Ordinance 3956, Chapter 14ADisaster relief force means all departments of City of Rochester, volunteer personnel andequipment, police officers and employees, and all other persons or groups of persons orequipment identified in the City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan as having duties toperform or those called into duty or working at the direction of a party identified in the plan toperform a specific disaster or emergency related task during a City state of emergency ordisaster.7.4 Emergency Operations PlanThe Emergency Operations Plan is coordinated by the Director and Deputy Director ofEmergency Management. Assistance in development of the Annexes is provided bydepartment liaisons. Additional assistance is provided by other City departments as needed. Basic Plan - 19 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan7.5 Duties of City Department LiaisonThe Emergency Management Director and Deputy Director identify departments with a role inemergency management. Each identified department provides a liaison who: • prepares and updates Annexes to the Emergency Operations Plan • prepares supporting plans and implementation instructions (maps, spreadsheets, checklists, and the like) • recruits, appoints, and organizes City staff and other volunteer personnel to be part of the disaster relief force • works in collaboration with other departments and agencies on emergency management activities • attends training courses on emergency management related subjects • participates in periodic exercises • develops resource lists for use in emergency management activities • identify and provide for the protection of vital records • implements the directives of the Mayor under a Local State of Emergency7.6 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Center Staffing Basic Plan - 20 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan8 Direction and Control 8.1 Legal Authority City of Rochester is recognized as an emergency management program under the Minnesota Emergency Management Act of 1996 and augmented by Rochester Code of Ordinances 3956, Chapter 14A: There is established a department of Emergency Management within the Rochester Fire Department for the purpose of coordinating all emergency and disaster mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery activities within the City. The Director and Deputy Director of Emergency Management shall have responsibility for the organization, administration, and operation of the office, subject to the direction and control of the City Administrator and Common Council. The City of Rochester will maintain control of incidents within its territorial jurisdiction. Further, the City of Rochester will provide assistance and coordination as an adjunct to a response in another jurisdiction subject to mutual aid agreements, the State of Minnesota Emergency Management Assistance Compacts, by request of Minnesota Division of HSEM, and/or available resources. Emergency or disaster situations require direction and control to ensure efficient and effective response and recovery operations. The Chief Executive/Elected Official (Mayor) grants authority for coordinating emergency support operations to the Fire Chief/Emergency Management Director through the implementation of the Emergency Operations Plan (EOP): 14A.05, Subd. 3. Mayor may do one or more of the following under a City state of emergency, A. Direct the Emergency Management Director to implement the Emergency Operations Plan. Implementation of the EOP and activation of the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) will be determined by the Emergency Management Director, Deputy Director, or any Deputy Director who is assigned the role of EOC Duty Officer. Implementation and activation triggers may be of sudden onset or slow-developing events (see ESF 5 for description of triggering events). The Chief Executive/Elected Official (Mayor) may declare a state of emergency under Ordinance Chapter 14A. If the situation is beyond local capability, assistance from neighboring jurisdictions may be requested through Mutual Aid agreements. With the Disaster Declaration, a request for State and/or Federal assistance may be presented to the Governor through the Minnesota Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM). Statewide coordination of emergency management activities is provided by HSEM. The Minnesota liaison to the City of Rochester is HSEM Region I Coordinator. Basic Plan - 21 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan8.2 Direction and Control of Emergency Operations Center (EOC)EOC Support Role. The Director and Deputy Director coordinate local assistance duringdisaster/emergency events. If needed, the EOC will be activated in a limited manner tomonitor conditions, or partially/fully activated to coordinate disaster response. Direction andcontrol is a critical emergency management function. The Director or Deputy Director providedirection and control before the EOC is activated by coordinating meetings, conference calls,or one-on-one consultation. Once the EOC is activated, the Director or Deputy Directorassumes leadership of the EOC Command Team, which provides overall direction and controlof city incidents. The EOC activation allows the City to: 1. Notify EOC staff to stand-up EOC Sections and begin coordinated response to an emergency 2. Analyze the emergency situation and decide on priorities and policies to be implemented 3. Develop a common operating picture (coordinate incident related information) 4. Coordinate multi-agency policies, priorities, and strategies, including provision of mutual aid resources (if needed) 5. Determine resource allocation – priorities for scarce resources 6. Provide logistical support and resource tracking 7. Conduct forecasting for long-range planning 8. Begin the recovery process before the event subsidesEOC Duty Officer. The primary role of the Emergency Management EOC Duty Officer is toprovide a 24/7 point-of-contact for City of Rochester emergency management functions.Emergency management functions include EOC management, consultation with emergencypartners, providing information, obtaining resources, gaining access to DisasterLAN, sendingalert & notification messages through Rochester Alert, and maintaining situational awarenessof emerging hazards (weather, chemical, or terrorism). The EOC Duty Officer can stand-upthe EOC as a method of early response.City of Rochester Emergency Management EOC Duty Officer can be reached 24/7 at(507) 328-8211. If the on-call EOC DUTY OFFICER is unavailable, any of the back-up EOCDuty Officer’s can be contacted via 911 Center Dispatch at (507) 328-6800.8.3 Direction and Control of Disaster RespondersScene Priorities. Emergency response and operation priorities: 1. Life Safety concerns 2. Incident Stabilization 3. Protect and preserve property and the environment Basic Plan - 22 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanNOTE: City employees living in areas impacted by a disaster shall first attend to personalfamily needs, and then report to work locations pre-designated in their department’s StandingOperating Guidelines for emergency and disaster incidents. Employees are encouraged tomake provisions ahead of time for the safety and well-being of their families.Scene Control and Operations. The manner in which the situation is managed willdetermine the effectiveness of the overall operation. First responders in the field operate byprinciples of the National Incident Management System.Large emergencies often require many agencies to work cooperatively. A Unified Commandstructure is utilized to coordinate the response efforts. When the EOC is activated, the EOCOperations Section communicates and coordinates actions with the Incident Commander(s)for overall direction of the emergency response effort.Multi-jurisdictional Command and Operations. Mutual Aid assistance is coordinated withthe Incident Management System under the National Incident Management structure, utilizingUnified Command where appropriate.A variety of responses can occur in terrorism-related events. State and Federal resourcesmay be enlisted to assist with field response and are expected to work within the NationalIncident Management System (NIMS).Complicated and slow-developing events will demand coordinated actions through theNational Incident Management System (NIMS) structure in operation at the EOC.A Multi-Agency Coordination Center (MACC) may be used as a base of operations. Locationsvary and include a mobile command post, building, and field tent or open area. (An EOC is aform of a MACC – in this section, a MACC is a field site).8.4 Reassignment of City Employee DutiesAs outlined in City of Rochester Ordinance Chapter 14A, the Mayor may director theEmergency Management Director, or Deputy Director to implement the EmergencyOperations Plan, and relieve city employees of normal duties and temporarily reassign themto other duties.8.5 Interface with State of Minnesota Homeland Security and EmergencyManagementMinnesota Duty Officer Program (from Emergency Management Directors Handbook). Thepurpose of the 24-hour Minnesota Duty Officer Program (MNDO) is to serve as the state’ssingle point of contact for public and private sector entities when state-level emergencyassistance of some type is needed, and/or a state agency notification is required due to aserious hazardous materials or nuclear power plant incident. Basic Plan - 23 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanThe scope of the Minnesota Duty Officer Program includes actual or impending events suchas (Emergency Management Directors Handbook C-10-1): • Hazardous materials incidents • Pipeline leaks or breaks • Radiological incidents • Requests for National Guard/Civil Air Patrol • Requests for CAT/ERT teams • Aircraft accidents/incidents • Search and rescue assistance • Bomb squad information • Natural disasters (tornado, flood, fire, etc.) • Requests for State Fire Marshal Investigators • Homeland security threats • Requests for 55th Civil Support Team (CST) supportAny incident requiring assistance from or notification of one or more of the following stateagencies: • Department of Agriculture • Department of Health • Department of Natural Resources • Department of Public Safety • Department of Transportation • Pollution Control AgencyWhen the Minnesota duty officer receives a call reporting an incident, the MNDO will notifystate agency personnel with the expertise and resources to assist the caller. One call to theMinnesota duty officer will satisfy federal and state incident reporting requirements to one ormultiple state agencies.The Minnesota duty officer telephone numbers: (800) 422-0798 (Greater Minnesota) or(651) 649-5451 (Metro area).8.6 Role of Public Health Minnesota Emergency Management Act of 1996 provides for the organization and utilizationof temporary medical care facilities to respond to a public health emergency using a plandeveloped by a local public health agency. See section 12.61 TEMPORARY MEDICAL CAREFACILITIES; LIABILITY (Appendix D). Basic Plan - 24 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan8.7 Volunteers and agenciesVolunteers may be appointed to implement emergency functions. Such individuals are part ofthe disaster relief force and are subject to the rules and operational control established in theplan. The City of Rochester Human Resources Department will process and document the useof volunteers. The United Way offers an efficient means to register volunteers and may beused under the Direction and Control of the HR Department.8.8 Private sectorPrivate sector coordination is vital to the successful management of many disasters. The EOCstaff will work in coordination with private sector representative. The EM Liaison will helpdetermine the appropriate seat to occupy within the EOC organization chart.8.9 LiabilityCity of Rochester Emergency Management Ordinance Chapter 14AIn accordance with the Chapter 14A, personnel of the disaster relief force while on duty shallhave the following rights: • As employees of the City, have the powers, duties, rights, privileges, and immunities and receive the compensation incidental to their employment (14A.09 (A)) • If they are not employees of the City be entitled to the same rights and immunities as are provided for by law (14A.09 (B))As provided for in Chapter 14A and MN Chapter 12, City of Rochester, or its agents orrepresentatives, shall not be liable for personal injury or property damage sustained by thedisaster relief force. In addition, any member of the disaster relief force engaged in disasterrelief activity shall not be liable in a civil action for damages resulting from an act or omissionarising out of and in the course of the persons good faith rendering of that activity, unless thepersons act or omission was the result of that persons gross negligence or willful misconduct.The right of a person to receive benefits or compensation to which he/she may otherwise beentitled to under the workers compensation law, any pension law, or act of Congress will notbe effected as a result of said activity.As provided for in Chapter 14A, any person owning or controlling real estate or other premiseswho voluntarily and without compensation grants the City the right to inspect, designate anduse the whole or any part of such real estate or premises for the purpose of shelteringpersons or for any other disaster related function during a declared City state of emergency orduring an authorized practice disaster exercise, shall not be civilly liable for the death of, orinjury to, any person on or about such real estate or premises under such license, privilege orother permission, or for loss of, or damage to, the property of such person. Basic Plan - 25 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan The City of Rochester participates with the State of Minnesota to provide one or more specialized emergency response teams. "When activated by the state director, team members not employed by any political subdivision struck by the emergency or disaster are deemed employees of the state for purposes of workers compensation and tort claim defense and indemnification" (Minn. Stat. § 12.351)9 Checking and Corrective Action 9.1 After Action Review After Action Review (AAR). Following each activation, or planned exercise, a review of the emergency management activities shall be conducted. Key participants will be debriefed and a report created. This report will be forwarded to the Mayor and kept on file in the Emergency Management Division. The AAR will be part of the Corrective Action Program (CAP) within HSEEP exercises. A formal method for capturing lessons learned is the After Action Review process. The After Action Review process can be a formal, group-led process, with a leader and recorder. It can also be an informal process involving the team members who were involved in the incident. The informal process is sometimes referred as a hotwash.10 Plan Development and Maintenance 10.1 Assignments and Responsibilities City of Rochester Emergency Management Ordinance Chapter 14A.04 B(1) The Emergency Management Director and Deputy Emergency Management Director shall: • Direct and coordinate the development of City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan, which shall be consistent in content with the Minnesota Emergency Management Plan. 10.2 Capability Assessment Capability Assessment. A capability assessment describes the documents and processes used to determine the thoroughness of planning, usefulness/completeness of emergency management tools, identification of resources, and ability of personnel to manage a disaster response. Planning Assessment. HSEM Local Emergency Operations Plan Crosswalk (MNWALK) is the document required by the State of Minnesota to review plan capability. Basic Plan - 26 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan All counties and cities participating in the EMPG program must have an all-hazard emergency operations plan which addresses the items listed in the MNWALK provided by HSEM. The MNWALK is a cross-reference tool that lists all required plan content items and includes blank spaces for identifying the location of those items in a completed plan (Emergency Management Directors Handbook, 2010).10.3 State of Minnesota Planning Requirements • The Emergency Operations Plan shall be reviewed annually, or as needed after an emergency incident. • A revised plan shall be issued at least every four years, or as required by Minnesota State Police EMHS Department. A plan maintenance and review schedule is found in the Mn Emergency Directors Handbook, Section C: Emergency Planning Program and PolicyFederal and State Planning Requirements (from Mn Emergency Management Directors Handbook) The following is a list of federal and state emergency planning requirements for counties and cities in the state of Minnesota: A. Federal Planning Requirements Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) 1. To be eligible to receive an Emergency Management Performance Grant (EMPG) or other non- disaster funds made available by FEMA, counties and cities must have an approved emergency operations plan (EOP). B. State Planning Requirements 1. Minnesota Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM) a.) Minnesota Statutes, Chapter 12, as amended (“The Minnesota Emergency Management Act of 1996”) stipulate that HSEM “...shall coordinate the development and maintenance of emergency operations plans and emergency management programs by the political subdivisions of this state, with the plans and programs integrated into and coordinated with the emergency operations plan and emergency management program of this state to the fullest possible extent.” It also stipulates that county emergency management organizations shall “...plan for the emergency operations of county government...” b.) Minnesota Statutes, Section 299K.05, stipulates that “Political subdivisions should prepare emergency plans that adequately address the requirements contained in ... the federal act.” The “federal act” is the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act, otherwise known as Basic Plan - 27 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. SARA Title III includes several requirements regarding the development, exercising, and updating of a local emergency plan. Minnesota State Fire Marshal, Office of Pipeline Safety Minnesota Statutes, Section 299J.10, requires a county or home rule charter city having a pipeline (as defined in the statute) within its jurisdiction to prepare an emergency operations plan and supporting documentation that will include appropriate pipeline safety information. “The format and content of the plan... must be in agreement with the guidance and prototype planning documents provided by HSEM.” Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Minnesota Statutes, Section 103F.155, requires communities having emergency flood measures (levees) to develop a plan adequate to provide protection in the event of levee failure.11 References 11.1 Attachments and Supporting Documents Attachments and supporting documents are located in DisasterLAN folders for each respective section of the plan (Basic Plan or Emergency Support Functions) LOGIN: http://eocdlan.rochestermn.gov/ (after Login, navigate to EOP folder) EOP Folder: http://eocdlan.rochestermn.gov/ResourcesModule/Browser.aspx?folder=1730&type=1 11.2 Plan Writing References City of Rochester (2009). Emergency Management Ordinance Chapter 14A. Rochester, Minnesota: City Clerk Commonwealth of Australia, Attorney-Generals Department. (2004). Emergency management in Australia: Concepts and principles. Dickson, ACT, Australia: Emergency Management Australia.Retrieved from http://www.ema.gov.au/www/emaweb/emaweb.nsf/Page/PublicationsAustralian_Eme rgency_Manual_Series (see Planning Overview, references to "Integrated" and "Comprehensive" inspired by this document) County of Olmsted (2009). All Hazard Mitigation Plan. Olmsted County, Minnesota: Rochester-Olmsted Planning Department Basic Plan - 28 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanDepartment of Public Safety, Homeland Security and Emergency Management Division. (2011). Minnesota Emergency Management Directors Handbook. St. Paul, Minnesota: HSEMMinnesota Statutes (2010). Minnesota Emergency Management Act of 1996. State of Minnesota: Office of the Revisor of StatutesQuarantelli, E.L. (2006, June 11). Catastrophes are Different from Disasters: Some Implications for Crisis Planning and Managing Drawn from Katrina. Retrieved from http://understandingkatrina.ssrc.org/Quarantelli/ Basic Plan - 29 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan12 Appendix A - Emergency Management Program 12.1 Community Profile Physical Setting. Rochester is located in southeastern Minnesota and is best known as the home of the world famous Mayo Clinic medical complex giving rise to the city’s nickname of “Med City”. It is located on the banks of the Zumbro River in Olmsted County. Rochester is also the county seat. It is also home to the largest IBM facility under one roof in the world as well as a number of agricultural related businesses. The city has a population of 106,769 as certified by the federal census of 2010, making it Minnesotas third-largest city and the largest outside of the Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington Metropolitan Statistical Area. The City of Rochester achieved City of the First Class designation on March 17, 2011, pursuant to provisions of Minnesota Statutes SS410.01. The city has long been a fixture onMoney magazines "Best Places to Live" index, and was ranked number 67 on the 2006 list. Geography. Rochester lies along the South Fork of the Zumbro River. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 39.8 square miles (103.0 km²) - 39.6 square miles (102.6 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.4 km²) of it (0.35%) is water. Rochester is in Olmsted County, one of only four counties in Minnesota without a natural lake. Artificial lakes exist in the area, including Silver Lake, a dammed portion of the South Fork Zumbro River just below the convergence with Silver Creek near the city center. The lake was used as a cooling pond for the nearby electrical power plant for many years, although the amount of water used for this purpose has been significantly reduced. Heated water in the lake generally prevents it from freezing over even during Minnesota winters, attracting migrating giant Canada geese, which have become symbols of the city. Basic Plan - 30 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanMinnesota is in the Central Standard Time (CST -6:00 GMT) zone and central daylight time.Property. The City of Rochester possesses property and infrastructure valued in excess of $2BillionInfrastructure. A major flood in 1978 led the city to embark on an expensive flood-controlproject that involved altering many nearby rivers and streams, creating retention reservoirs,and installing levees and other flood control measures.Demographics. As of the 2005-2007 American Community Survey conducted by the U.S.Census Bureau, there were 95,179 people, 39,203 households, and 23,831 families residingin the city. There were 42,049 housing units. There were 39,203 households out of which49.8% were married couples. About 31.6% had children under the age of 18. About 2.5%were made up of a male householder with no wife present and about 8.5% were made up of afemale householder with no husband present. In addition, 39.2% of all households were non-family households and 32.6% of households were made up of householders living alone. And8.7% of households were made up of someone living alone who was 65 years of and over.The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 3.04.As of the 2005-2007 American Community Survey, the median household income was$57,957 and the median family income was $74,467. The per capita income was $30,977.About 5.9% of families and 8.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including11.5% of those under age 18 and 5.1% of those aged 65 or over.As of the 2005-2007 American Community Survey Demographic Estimates, Non-HispanicWhites made up 83.7% of Rochesters population. African Americans made up 4.8% of thepopulation while American Indians made up only 0.2% of the populace. Asians were thelargest minority group, representing 6.2% of Rochesters population. Hispanics or Latinosmade up 3.5% of the citys population. In terms of ancestry, German Americans were thelargest single ethnic group in Rochester, making up a significant 35.5% of the cityspopulation. Norwegian Americans represented 15.9% of Rochesters population while IrishAmericans contributed to 11.6% of the citys populace. English Americans made up 8.2% ofthe population and Swedish Americans were 5.5% of the citys population.The age distribution was as follows. • Under 5 years: 8.0% • 5-9 years: 6.1% • 10-14 years: 6.6% • 15-19 years: 6.3% • 20-24 years: 6.0% • 25-34 years: 15.7% • 35-44 years: 15.2% Basic Plan - 31 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan • 45-54 years: 14.7% • 55-59 years: 5.1% • 60-64 years: 4.3% • 65-74 years: 6.0% • 75-84 years: 4.0% • 85 years and over: 1.9% • Median age: 35.7 yearsResponse Organizations. The Departments of Police, Fire, Public Works, and Parks providefirst response to emergencies. Gold Cross Ambulance Service provides emergency medicalfirst response services.12.2 Hazard ProfileHazard Analysis SummaryThe most common hazards affecting the State of Minnesota are floods, tornados, wildfire, andwindstorms. City of Rochester most common hazards are floods, tornados, severethunderstorms, severe winter storms, cyberattack (computer viruses, and the like), hazardousmaterials, terrorism-related, and public illnesses.See the Olmsted Countys Hazard Identification and Vulnerability Analysis (HIVA) and AllHazards Mitigation Plan (AHMP) for a description of potential emergency conditions andvulnerable populations.Risks may affect people, property, City of Rochester business operations, the environment, orthe organization. Hazards may be natural, human-caused, or technological.Natural hazards include weather related or biological. Common weather hazards includeflooding, winter storms, and tornados, severe thunderstorms producing lightening, andextreme heat or cold that is sustained. Biological hazards are disease related, such aspandemic influenza.Human caused hazards may be accidental or intentional. Accident hazards include fire,hazardous materials release, transportation accidents, building structure failure, power failure,communication or IT system failure, or financial issues. Intentional hazards include terrorism,vandalism, civil disturbance, and labor dispute, disinformation to damage reputation,information security breach, arson, child abduction, kidnap, hostage incident, or workplaceviolence.Technological hazards include telecommunications failure, IT systems failure, orenergy/power/utility failure. Basic Plan - 32 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanThe Hazard Vulnerability Analysis (HVA) was developed jointly with Olmsted County, theMayo Clinic, and City of Rochester in May 2008. The top five identified hazards from the HVAare: • Cyber attack • major criminal act • Hazmat • Biological disease outbreak • Severe thunderstorm/tornadoThe complete HVA and the Olmsted County All Hazard Mitigation Plan is on file in theEmergency Management Division.12.3 Characteristics of Effective Emergency Management OrganizationalStructures 1. Clearly defined roles for elected officials 2. Strong and definitive lines of command 3. Similar routine/disaster organizational structures 4. Emergency management procedures are as close to routine operational procedures as possible 5. Foster and maintain good interpersonal relationships 6. Emergency management planning is an ongoing activity 7. An all hazards approach to emergency planning 8. Disaster prevention and mitigation of impact from likely hazards 9. Involvement of all city departments, volunteer agencies, and community partners in emergency planning 10. Create a culture of citizen preparedness 11. Create a culture of employee readiness 12. Strong coordination among participating agencies and emergency partners 13. Foster public/private cooperation 14. Seek multiple use of resources (dual application for emergency and peacetime) 15. Public Information function clearly defined 16. On-going monitoring to be alert for potential disasters 17. Internal alerting procedures for teams and personnel 18. Ability to alert the public is optimized 19. Seek active intergovernmental coordination 20. Provide ability to maintain comprehensive records during a disaster 21. Eligibility for State and Federal subsidiesSource: Characteristics of Effective Emergency Management Organizational Structures (2009), PublicEntity Risk Institute (PERI) www.riskinstitute.org Basic Plan - 33 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan12.4 Strategy, Goals, ObjectivesCity of Rochester Ordinance Chapter 14A.04 describes a number of measures to beaccomplished. Strategy, goals and objectives are formulated to accomplish these measuresand are described in the most current version of the Strategic Plan for EmergencyManagement on file in the Office of Emergency Management.12.5 Public EducationCitizen preparation is a vital step toward a safer community, and can help themselves andothers in their community by: • being aware of local hazards and the risks that may result from them • take precautions against such risks; • engaged with community-based voluntary groups and organizations • ensure that local government has effective preparedness measuresVoluntary organizations, when integrated into local emergency management, can play a vitalpart in emergency response and recovery, not only in giving access to community resourcesand expertise but also in acting as a link in the essential information chain between localgovernment, emergency management agencies and the community.When major emergencies or disasters strike, individual and community self-help can oftenprovide the most readily-available and effective relief: assistance from external sources maybe limited or delayed by other demands on resources. Local government and communityorganizations, with their understanding of local needs and capabilities, provide the basis fororganizing effective and immediately-available community self-help (Emergency management inAustralia: Concepts and principles, 2004). Basic Plan - 34 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan13 Appendix B - Training, Awareness and Competence 13.1 City of Rochester Training Requirements As a baseline, NIMS 700 and 100 give both EOC staff and response personnel an adequate level of training. • IS-700 NIMS, An Introduction • ICS-100 Introduction to the Incident Command System Certain individuals will be assigned greater responsibilities, and additional NIMS training is available to acquire knowledge and skills to complete emergency tasks. Training needs are determined by department heads, and as required under the Emergency Operations Plan, or Rochester Code of Ordinances Chapter 14A (Section 13.3 for current NIMS Courses). Emergency Operations Center (EOC) management requires specialized skills to achieve smooth and efficient workflow. Specific training courses are developed and offered to help EOC staff members acquired desired skill sets. • Elected Officials Training • Senior Officials Workshop • DisasterLAN • Rochester-Alert • Terrorism Awareness • Public Information Officers Symposium • Damage Assessment • Others, as determined by emerging needs 13.2 State of Minnesota Training Requirements The State of Minnesota requires certification training for emergency managers, and provides the same training courses to other partners on an optional basis. Required training for emergency management personnel is found in the Minnesota Emergency Directors Handbook, Section C: Emergency Management Training Program and Policy (http://www.hsem.state.mn.us/Hsem_Subcategory_Home.asp?scatid=67&catid=4). Training Calendar (from Mn Emergency Directors Handbook, C-2-1) An annual HSEM training and activities calendar is electronically published every September and is available on the HSEM web site www.hsem.state.mn.us. This calendar lists the FEMA and state- developed training courses that HSEM plans to offer in the coming federal fiscal year (October 1- September 30). The calendar is updated as courses are revised and/or new courses are added. Course titles, dates, locations, and application links are included in this calendar. Admission to training courses is arranged via an online registration program. Copy and paste the following link into your web browser: http://www.dps.state.mn.us/dhsem/HSEM_Training/Hsemindex.asp Basic Plan - 35 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan In addition, FEMA offers independent study programs on a wide variety of subjects. The training list is frequently updated, with a complete list found on the Independent Study website: http://www.training.fema.gov/is/ 13.3 National Incident Management System Training National Incident Management System (NIMS) Training Program – September 2011 The NIMS Training Program (September 2011) was developed to provide training guidance for emergency management officials and administrators responsible for emergency response, emergency planning, and other activities where NIMS training establishes a foundation. The NIMS Training Program defines the process for developing training and identifies those courses critical to train personnel capable of implementing all functions of emergency management. It revises the NIMS core curriculum to ensure it adequately trains emergency and incident response personnel to all concepts and principles of each NIMS component. Training is dependent upon the complexity of the incident likely to happen, and the needs of emergency responders http://www.fema.gov/pdf/emergency/nims/nims_training_program.pdfNIMS Courses: Baseline • IS 700: National Incident Management System, An Introduction • IS 100: Introduction to Incident Command SystemNIMS Courses: Additional Training • IS-701 NIMS MACS • IS-702 NIMS Public Information • IS-703 NIMS Resource Management • IS-704 NIMS Communication and Information Management • IS-706 NIMS Interstate Mutual Aid, an Introduction • IS-800 National Response Framework (NRF), an Introduction • ICS-200 ICS for Single Resources and Initial Action Incidents • ICS 300: Intermediate ICS for Expanding Incidents • ICS 400: Advanced ICS Command and General Staff—Complex Incidents • E/L-950 All-Hazards Incident Commander • E/L 952 All-Hazards Public Information Officer • E/L 954 All-Hazards Safety Officer • E/L 956 All-Hazards Liaison Officer • E/L 958 All-Hazards Operations Section Chief • E/L 960 All-Hazards Division/Group Supervisor (DIVS) • E/L 962 All-Hazards Planning Section Chief • E/L 964 All-Hazards Situation Unit Leader (STIL) • E/L 965 All-Hazards Resource Unit Leader (RESL) Basic Plan - 36 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan • E/L 967 All-Hazards Logistics Section Chief • E/L 969 All-Hazards Communications Unit Leader • E/L 970 All-Hazards Supply Unit Leader (SPUL) • E/L 971 All-Hazards Facilities Unit Leader (FACL • E/L 973 All-Hazards Finance/Administration Section Chief • E/L 975 All-Hazards Finance/Administration Unit Leader • G-191 Incident Command System/Emergency Operations Center Interface • G-775 Emergency Operations Center Management and OperationsState of Minnesota GuidanceSee Updated National Incident Management System Training Program HSEM IncidentCommand System (ICS) Training Requirements available athttps://dps.mn.gov/divisions/hsem/training/Documents/Updated_NIMS_w_Matrix%5b1%5d.pdf Basic Plan - 37 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan14 Appendix C – Exercise Program 14.1 Purpose The purpose of the City of Rochester exercise program is to provide common exercise policy and program guidance for exercises conducted in within the jurisdiction 14.2 Policy The City of Rochester is required to follow Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) guidance to develop and conduct exercises. The following policy statements apply: • This policy applies to exercises conducted within the jurisdiction (defined as within territorial limits, or city limits, by Emergency Management Act of 1996). • At a minimum, HSEEP exercises include an Initial Planning Conference (IPC), Final Planning Conference (FPC), and a Corrective Action Report (CAP). • Exercises will be capability based. • The Fire Department Emergency Management Division will assist city departments and community emergency partners: o City Departments. City departments often engage in exercises to improve capabilities. This policy is designed to enhance current practices. Department directors are responsible for Emergency Support Functions (ESF) within the City Emergency Operations Plan. Exercises assist with development and refinement of the ESF. o Community Partners. The City of Rochester has a responsibility to assist community partners with their exercise requirements. Community emergency partners (hospitals, prisons, businesses) will often hold exercises to prepare employees for responses within their facilities. This policy does not apply to facility response preparations. If exercises need to utilize City of Rochester response capabilities, this policy does apply and exercises will be conducted using HSEEP guidance. The Emergency Management Division will provide assistance to include the essential exercise elements. 14.3 State of MN requirements NEXS: Enter exercises in NEXS portal under the Minnesota domain: https://hseep.dhs.gov/DHS_SSO/default.aspx Basic Plan - 38 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanImprovement Plan: Submit reports using the EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT EXERCISEAfter Action Report / Corrective Action Plan (AAR / CAP)http://www.hsem.state.mn.us/uploadedfile/exer_rpt_form.pdfMulti-Year Training and Exercise Plan: The primary purpose of an exercise program is toimprove the operational readiness of the emergency management system. The Multi-YearTraining and Exercise Plan is the roadmap for accomplishing priorities described in the Stateor Urban Area homeland security strategy. Included in the plan should be the Training andExercise Schedule for the ensuing 3 years.An exercise program is based on the Emergency Operations Plan or related implementationinstructions (plans, procedures, and the like), and uses functions as a guide. These functionsinclude: • Alert notifications • Communications • Coordination and control • Emergency public information • Damage assessment • Health and medical • Individual and family assistance • Public safety • Public works • Resource management • Warning • Effectiveness of warning14.4 Capability Based ExercisesThe Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program encourages the use of capability-based exercises. Capabilities-based planning provides the foundation for developing exercise program objectives, identifying sets of capabilities to exercise, and determining the conditions and scenarios that should be included and addressed in exercises. Rather than continually trying to predict the next threat or hazard that an entity may face, a capabilities-based approach to exercising allows exercise program managers and planners to focus on the capabilities (e.g., evacuation, mass care) that are inherent to a variety of scenarios (e.g., hurricanes, improvised nuclear devices). Source: HSEEP Volume I, Chapter 4The ability of the City of Rochester to manage a disaster is dependent upon the capabilitiesthat exist to prevent, respond to, recover from, and prepare for disasters. For example, thefire department operates a Chemical Assessment Team (CAT) to provide the capability torespond to a hazardous materials release. A hazardous materials exercise could improve theresponse capability by strengthening the capability of response services. These services Basic Plan - 39 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Planinclude the ability to alert the public, evacuation or sheltering of vulnerable populations, themedical communitys ability to treat injured victims, and/or the recovery from a chemicalrelease incident.Police, Fire, Public Works and other responders each possess unique capabilities to handleemergency situations. These capabilities are not limited to the ability to respond toemergencies. It includes the ability to prevent disaster, such as the flood control structures(reservoirs, levees). Exercises are developed to assess current capabilities, and the lessonslearned are applied to improve plans, procedures, identify needed equipment and/or services.14.5 Type of ExercisesIn addition to State of Minnesota exercise requirements, the training and exercise needs ofemergency management partners are considered. Rochester International Airport, MayoClinic, and SARA Title III partners receive assistance from various city departments withperiodic exercises, such as drills, tabletop, and full-scale exercises. Exercises may be eitherdiscussion- based or operations-based: Discussion Based Exercises Familiarize audiences with current plans, procedures, policies, Function mutual aid agreements, and implementation instructions using a variety of methods Type Purpose Outcome Seminars Presenter provides orientation to Awareness of planning emergency plans, procedures, document contents Workshops Facilitator-led, group discussion Revise plans on a focused problem or hazard Create new plans, procedures, Develop implementation instructions Tabletop Exercise (TTX) Sequential, objective- based Better understanding of exercise designed for active response relationships participation of members Identify areas for improvement in planning documents, response concepts Revise plans, procedures Operations Based Exercises Validate plans, procedures, policies, mutual aid agreements, and Function implementation instructions; Determine appropriate responsibilities; Identify areas for improvement Type Purpose Outcome Drills Practical exercise which focuses Develop or refresh skills on development of skills, or application of response sequence to a specific hazard Basic Plan - 40 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan or threat Functional Realistic & Simulated time-based Refine skills exercise held in an emergency operations center, or other large meeting room; EOC activities are actual; Field activities are simulated Full-Scale Realistic,time-based exercise Provides both first which utilizes first responders responders and emergency acting at a simulated scene, operations center staff with radio traffic and incident simulated disaster or major scene resource requests. emergency response elements Improves field to EOC response procedures14.6 HSEEP Exercise Program ManagementExercise project management involves five phases, which are collectively known asthe exercise cycle. Exercises conducted in accordance with the phases of the exercise cyclelead to tangible preparedness improvements.The five phases of the exercise cycle are as follows: Foundation: The following activities must be accomplished to provide the foundation for an effective exercise: create a base of support (i.e., establish buy-in from the appropriate entities and/or senior officials); develop a project management timeline and establish milestones; identify an exercise planning team; and schedule planning conferences. Design and Development: Building on the exercise foundation, the design and development process focuses on identifying objectives, designing the scenario, creating documentation, coordinating logistics, planning exercise conduct, and selecting an evaluation and improvement methodology. Conduct: After the design and development steps are complete, the exercise takes place. Exercise conduct steps include setup, briefings, facilitation/control/evaluation, and wrap-up activities. Evaluation: The evaluation phase for all exercises includes a formal exercise evaluation, an integrated analysis, and an AAR/IP that identifies strengths and areas for improvement in an entity’s preparedness, as observed during the exercise. Recommendations related to areas for improvement are identified to help develop corrective actions to be tracked throughout the improvement planning phase. Basic Plan - 41 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Improvement Planning: During improvement planning, the corrective actions identified in the evaluation phase are assigned, with due dates, to responsible parties; tracked to implementation; and then validated during subsequent exercises. (Source: HSEEP Volume I, Chapter 1 Exercise Program Management)Goals and objectives of the exercise program are based on Department of Homeland Security(DHS) target capabilities list (TCL) and universal task list (UTL). Current DHS lists can beviewed online at https://odp.esportals.com or https://www.llis.dhs.gov.14.7 Required ExercisesDiscussion of Federal, State and local regulations, identifying the following regulations as the guidingpurpose of the exercise program: Rochester International Airport 14 CFR 139 Full-Scale or Functional exercise every three years 49 CFR 1542 Hospitals (Mayo Clinic/Olmsted Joint Commission guidance Various exercises as Medical Center/FMC) (not regulatory but suggested by current guidance) guidance Emergency Management Emergency Management Act Exercise once per quarter, of 1996, Chapter 12 Full-Scale or Functional (HSEEP Requirement) every 4 years Local Rochester Code of Ordinances, Chapter 14A Basic Plan - 42 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan15 Appendix D - State of Minnesota Emergency Management Act 15.1 State of Minnesota Emergency Management Act of 1996 (excerpts) 12.23 FACILITIES, UTILIZATION. In carrying out the provisions of this chapter, the governor and the governing bodies of the political subdivisions of the state shall utilize the services, equipment, supplies, and facilities of existing departments, offices, and agencies of the state and of the political subdivisions of the state to the maximum extent practicable. The officers and personnel of the departments, offices, and agencies shall cooperate with and extend services and facilities to the governor and to the emergency management organizations of the state upon request. 12.25 LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS; DIRECTORS, DUTIES. Subdivision 1. Political subdivisions; director, responsibilities. Each political subdivision shall establish a local organization for emergency management in accordance with the state emergency management program, but no town shall establish a local organization for emergency management without approval of the state director. Each local organization for emergency management must have a director appointed forthwith: in a city by the mayor, in a town by the town board, and for a public corporation organized and existing under sections 473.601 to 473.679 by its governing body. The local director is directly responsible for the organization, administration, and operation of the local organization for emergency management, subject to the direction and control of the local governing body. Subd. 2. Counties; director, responsibilities. (b) A county organization for emergency management has jurisdiction throughout the county outside of a city or of a town that has a local emergency management organization. Subd. 3. Territorial limits. Each local and county organization for emergency management shall perform emergency management functions within the territorial limits of the political subdivision within which it is organized and, in addition, shall conduct these functions outside of its territorial limits as may be required pursuant to sections 12.23, 12.27, and 12.32 or any other applicable law. 12.27 MUTUAL AID, ARRANGEMENTS. Subdivision 1. Authority; organizations in Minnesota. The director of each local organization for emergency management may, in collaboration with other public and private agencies within this state, develop or cause to be developed mutual aid arrangements for reciprocal emergency management aid and assistance in an emergency or disaster too great to be dealt with unassisted. These arrangements must be consistent with the local emergency operations plan and, in time of emergency, each local organization for emergency management and its members shall render assistance in accordance with the provisions of the mutual aid arrangements. Subd. 3. Local delegation of authority. (a) No later than 90 days after August 1, 1996, the governing body of a political subdivision shall designate a city administrator or manager, public safety director, police chief, fire chief, public works director, or other officer who, exercising Basic Plan - 43 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plandiscretion and considering the needs of the political subdivision and its inhabitants, may dispatchequipment and personnel as considered necessary if a danger of fire, hazard, casualty, oranother similar occurrence exists outside the political subdivision and by its suddenness it wouldbe impractical for the governing body itself to authorize the dispatch of equipment and personnelto combat that emergency or disaster.(b) Action under this subdivision is an act of the political subdivision. All provisions forcompensation of personnel, rental of equipment, liability insurance coverage, workerscompensation insurance, and other matters pertaining to the political subdivision, its equipment,and personnel, apply in each case as if specifically authorized and directed.(c) The officer shall end the use of equipment and personnel when the need no longer exists orearlier at the officers discretion if it appears to be in the best interest of the political subdivision.12.29 DECLARATION OF LOCAL EMERGENCY.Subdivision 1. Authority to declare emergency. A local emergency may be declared only by themayor of a municipality or the chair of a county board of commissioners or their legal successors.It may not be continued for a period in excess of three days except by or with the consent of thegoverning body of the political subdivision. Any order or proclamation declaring, continuing, orterminating a local emergency must be given prompt and general publicity and filed promptly bythe chief of the local record-keeping agency of the political subdivision.Subd. 2. Effect of declaration of emergency. A declaration of a local emergency invokesnecessary portions of the response and recovery aspects of applicable local or interjurisdictionaldisaster plans, and may authorize aid and assistance under those plans.Subd. 3. Interjurisdictional agencies. No interjurisdictional agency or official may declare a localemergency unless expressly authorized by the agreement under which the agency functions.However, an interjurisdictional disaster agency shall provide aid and services in accordance withthe agreement under which it functions.12.32 GOVERNORS ORDERS AND RULES, EFFECT.Orders and rules promulgated by the governor under authority of section 12.21, subdivision 3,clause (1), when approved by the Executive Council and filed in the Office of the Secretary ofState, have, during a national security emergency, peacetime emergency, or energy supplyemergency, the full force and effect of law. Rules and ordinances of any agency or politicalsubdivision of the state inconsistent with the provisions of this chapter or with any order or rulehaving the force and effect of law issued under the authority of this chapter, is suspended duringthe period of time and to the extent that the emergency exists.12.33 ASSISTANCE BETWEEN POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS.Subdivision 1. Authority of governor. When the public interest requires it because of animminent emergency, the governor may authorize and direct the police, fire-fighting, health, orother force of a political subdivision, called the sending political subdivision, to go to theassistance of another political subdivision, called the receiving political subdivision, and to take Basic Plan - 44 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Planand use the personnel, equipment, and supplies of the sending political subdivision as thegovernor may direct.Subd. 2. Effect. While engaged in the activities described in subdivision 1, the officers andmembers of those forces have the same powers, duties, rights, privileges, and immunities as ifthey were performing like service in the sending political subdivision and are considered to beacting within the scope of and in the course of their regular employment, as employees of thesending political subdivision.Subd. 3. Reimbursement by local government receiving assistance. The receiving politicalsubdivision shall reimburse the sending political subdivision for the supplies used and thecompensation paid to the officers and members of the forces furnished, during such time as therendition of aid prevents them from performing their duties in the sending political subdivision, forthe actual traveling and maintenance expenses of the officers and members while so engaged. Aclaim for loss, damage, or expense in using equipment or supplies or for additional expensesincurred in operating or maintaining them must not be allowed unless within 90 days after theloss, damage, or expense is sustained or incurred an itemized notice of it, verified by an officer oremployee of the municipality having knowledge of the facts, is filed with the clerk of the receivingpolitical subdivision.Subd. 4. Reimbursement by state. It is the policy of the state to reimburse the sending politicalsubdivision for loss or damage to equipment used outside of the corporate limits of the sendingpolitical subdivision and to reimburse the sending political subdivision for additional expensesincurred in operating and maintaining the equipment outside of its corporate limits. A claim forloss, damage, or expense in using equipment or for additional expenses incurred in operating ormaintaining the equipment must not be allowed unless within 90 days after it is sustained orincurred an itemized notice of the claim, verified by an officer or employee of the sending politicalsubdivision having knowledge of the facts, is filed with the state director.12.34 ASSISTANCE REQUIRED; COMPENSATION FOR PROPERTY TAKEN; PENALTY.Subdivision 1. Emergency powers. When necessary to save life, property, or the environmentduring a national security emergency or during a peacetime emergency, the governor, the statedirector, or a member of a class of members of a state or local emergency managementorganization designated by the governor, may:(1) require any person, except members of the federal or state military forces and officers of thestate or a political subdivision, to perform services for emergency management purposes asdirected by any of the persons described above; and(2) commandeer, for emergency management purposes as directed by any of the personsdescribed above, any motor vehicles, tools, appliances, medical supplies, or other personalproperty and any facilities.Subd. 2. Compensation. The owner of commandeered property must be promptly paid justcompensation for its use and all damages done to the property while so used for emergencymanagement purposes. The governor or the governing body of the political subdivisionconcerned, respectively, according to the use of the property, shall make a formal order Basic Plan - 45 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plandetermining the amount of compensation. The owner may appeal to the district court of thecounty in which the property was commandeered if, within 30 days from the date of the order, theowner serves upon the governor or the political subdivision concerned and files with the courtadministrator of the district court a written notice of appeal setting forth the order appealed fromand, in detail, the amount claimed as compensation. Upon appeal, the issue is the amount ofdamages to which the appellant is entitled. It may be noticed for trial as in the case of a civilaction and the court may require other parties to be joined and to plead when necessary to aproper determination of the questions involved. The cause must be tried without a jury de novoand the court shall determine the damages and the person or persons entitled to them. Except asherein otherwise provided, the trial must be conducted and the cause disposed of according tothe rules applicable to civil actions in the district court. The court in its discretion may award to theprevailing party the costs and disbursements of the appeal.Subd. 3. Penalty. An able-bodied person required to perform services for emergencymanagement who refuses, neglects, or otherwise fails to perform the services required undersubdivision 1 is guilty of a misdemeanor and must be punished by imprisonment in the county jailfor not less than ten days or more than 90 days.12.35 ACTIVATING EMERGENCY RESPONSE PERSONNEL.Subdivision 1. [Repealed by amendment, 1996 c 344 s 24]Subd. 2. Personnel rights, duties, privileges. Emergency response personnel, while activatedby the state, are considered state employees and have the powers, duties, rights, privileges, andimmunities provided by law for the employees of this state.Subd. 3. Local government reimbursement; emergency response. The state shall reimbursea political subdivision for the compensation paid and actual and necessary travel, subsistence,and maintenance expenses of employees of the political subdivision while they are activated bythe state director as emergency response personnel. Reimbursement must also be provided forall payments for death, disability, or injury in the course of duty, and for all losses of or damage tosupplies and equipment of the political subdivision resulting from the operations of the emergencyresponse personnel.Subd. 3a. Local government reimbursement; training. The state shall also reimburse apolitical subdivision for the compensation paid and actual and necessary travel, subsistence, andmaintenance expenses of employees of the political subdivision while they are activated by thestate director in order to participate in specifically authorized training and exercises.12.351 SPECIALIZED EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM.The state director of the Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management shalldetermine if, in response to an emergency or disaster, activation of a specialized emergencyresponse team for deployment to any political subdivision is in the public interest. If so, the statedirector may activate a team. When activated by the state director, team members not employedby any political subdivision struck by the emergency or disaster are deemed employees of thestate for purposes of workers compensation and tort claim defense and indemnification. The Basic Plan - 46 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Planprovisions of chapter 176 and other applicable statutes must be followed for purposes ofcalculating workers compensation benefits.12.37 POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS POWERS TO FAST PROVIDE EMERGENCY AID.During an emergency or disaster, each political subdivision, notwithstanding any statutory orcharter provision to the contrary, and through its governing body acting within or without thecorporate limits of the political subdivision, may:(1) enter into contracts and incur obligations necessary to combat the disaster by protecting thehealth and safety of persons and property and by providing emergency assistance to the victimsof the disaster; and(2) exercise the powers vested by this subdivision in the light of the exigencies of the disasterwithout compliance with time-consuming procedures and formalities prescribed by law pertainingto:(i) the performance of public work;(ii) entering into contracts;(iii) incurring of obligations;(iv) employment of temporary workers;(v) rental of equipment;(vi) purchase of supplies and materials;(vii) limitations upon tax levies; and(viii) the appropriation and expenditure of public funds, for example, but not limited to, publicationof ordinances and resolutions, publication of calls for bids, provisions of civil service laws andrules, provisions relating to low bids, and requirements for budgets.12.61 TEMPORARY MEDICAL CARE FACILITIES; LIABILITY.Subdivision 1. Definitions. For purposes of this section:(a) “Emergency plan” includes:(i) any plan for managing an emergency threatening public health developed by the commissioner of healthor a local public health agency;(ii) any plan for managing an emergency threatening public health developed by one or more hospitals,clinics, nursing homes, or other health care facilities or providers and approved by the commissioner ofhealth or local public health agency in consultation with emergency management officials; or Basic Plan - 47 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan(iii) any provision for assistance by out-of-state responders under interstate or international compacts,including but not limited to the Emergency Management Assistance Compact.(b) “Regional hospital system” means all hospitals in one of the hospital bioterrorism preparednessprogram geographic regions of the state set forth in the most recent hospital preparedness plan availableon the Department of Health Web site at www.health.state.mn.us/oep.(c) “Responder” means any person or organization whether paid or volunteer that provides health care orother health-related services in an emergency including, but not limited to, physicians, physician assistants,registered and other nurses, certified nursing assistants, or other staff within a health care providerorganization, pharmacists, chiropractors, dentists, emergency medical technicians, members of aspecialized medical response unit, laboratory technicians, morticians, registered first responders, mentalhealth professionals, hospitals, nursing and boarding care facilities, home health care agencies, otherlong-term care providers, medical and dental clinics, medical laboratories, and ambulance servicepersonnel, dispatch services, and persons not registered as first responders but affiliated with a medicalresponse unit and dispatched to the scene of an emergency by a public safety answering point or licensedambulance service.Subd. 2. Emergency executive order. (a) During a national security emergency or a peacetime emergencydeclared under section 12.31, the governor may issue an emergency executive order upon finding that thenumber of seriously ill or injured persons exceeds the emergency hospital or medical transport capacity ofone or more regional hospital systems and that care for those persons has to be given in temporary carefacilities.(b) During the effective period of the emergency executive order, a responder in any impacted regionacting consistent with emergency plans is not liable for any civil damages or administrative sanctions as aresult of good faith acts or omissions by that responder in rendering emergency care, advice, or assistance.This section does not apply in case of malfeasance in office or willful or wanton actions. Basic Plan - 48 September 14, 2011
    • Emergency Support Function – 1 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan TransportationI. ResponsibilitiesPRIMARY AGENCY: Public Works DepartmentSUPPORT AGENCIES: Fire Department Police Department Park and Recreation Finance - Information ServicesII. Overview ft City Lines (Private Transportation Services) raA. PurposeThe purpose of Emergency Support Function (ESF) 1, Transportation, is to provide organization, mobilization,coordination and delivery of transportation support and assistance following an incident. DB. Scope 1. The Public Works Department is designated as lead department for coordinating transportation related activities within the City of Rochester. 2. The provision of transportation support includes: • The coordination of transportation activities to supplement the efforts of City departments with each other and other jurisdictions or agencies. • The establishment of appropriate incident notification and priority, mobilization, use, and/or allocation of transportation resources. • The processing of all transportation requests, including: evacuation routes of affected populations, coordination of debris management routes of travel; prioritization of roadway restoration and recovery phase repair work; conducting damage assessments of roads; and coordination with City departments, local jurisdictions, and State and federal agencies. ESF 1 Transportation - 1 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanIII. Policies 1. Transportation planning is directed towards satisfying two operational demands. The first is to ensure the integrity of the City’s transportation infrastructure. The second is to coordinate and provide transportation assistance to other departments and jurisdictions. 2. The City of Rochester will perform emergency management functions within its territorialboundaries as mandated by Minnesota Chapter 12.25.IV. SituationA. Incident conditions and hazards 1. See the Olmsted County Hazards Identification and Vulnerability Assessment (HIVA) and All Hazards Mitigation Plan (HMP) for a description of potential emergency conditions and vulnerable populations. 2. Localized transportation systems and activities may be hampered by the damaged transportation infrastructure and disrupted communications. 3. A significant incident may severely damage the transportation infrastructure and isolate residents both inside and outside of Rochester.B. Planning assumptions ft ra 1. No guarantee of a perfect response system is expressed or implied by this ESF. The City of Rochester will make every reasonable effort to respond based on the situation, information, and resources available at the time of the incident. 2. Available resources may become limited due to high demand in a large-scale incident. 3. All departments are required to support this ESF as necessary. D 4. The scale and magnitude of the incident will determine response capabilities. The transportation network may experience extensive damage creating problems of isolation. 5. Incident response and recovery activities require the use of the transportation system. 6. Access to the incident area is dependent upon the re-establishment of ground, air and water routes. Gradual clearing of access routes permits a sustained flow of incident relief efforts. 7. Rapid assessment of the incident area is made to determine critical response time and potential workload. Public Works, Fire, and Police Department staffs immediately patrol primary lifeline routes throughout the affected areas. 8. The use of the transportation system for response and recovery activities may exceed the capabilities of the City of Rochester’s transportation resources and support, therefore requiring assistance form the County, State, and federal governments to supplement efforts. 9. Communication systems may be affected by the incident requiring alternate methods of communication to be used. 10. Critical City facilities are self-sufficient for at least three days. ESF 1 Transportation - 2 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanV. Concept of OperationsA. General Operations 1. Public transportation authorities are responsible for the assessment and restoration of transportation systems under their control. When incident needs expand beyond the capacity of the City, coordination with neighboring jurisdictions through mutual aid agreements and inter-local agreements will assist the City in carrying out essential functions.B. Procedures 1. As prescribed in Public Works Standard Operating Guidelines (SOGs), the City Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and its Emergency Operations Plan (EOP), and other supporting plans and documents should: 2. Notify all appropriate departments, agencies, and affected individuals as soon as possible to provide early warning of system changes and roadway conditions. 3. Identify the most efficient and effective method of operating the transportation routes to appropriately respond to an incident. 4. 5. ft Manage the City’s vehicle and equipment fleet and provide parts and supplies. Organize alternate means of transportation as necessitated by the severity of the incident on coordination with the City Public Transit, its contracted operators, and third-party transportation ra providers. 6. Provide damage assessment of streets, overpasses, pedestrian/bicycle routes, traffic signals, other transportation facilities, and track available equipment. 7. Provide for emergency repair and restoration of City-owned transportation facilities and coordinate the repair of facilities owned by other agencies that are essential to the functions of the City’s transportation network. D 8. Coordinate operational strategies with City departments and other public transportation authorities as required. 9. Coordinate additional resources that may be obtained through existing mutual aid agreements and/or contracts through private contractors.C. Prevention and mitigation activities 1. Bridges and roads are maintained to engineering standards. 2. Integrate this plan, the HIVA, and the All Hazards Mitigation Plan into response methods so as to respond in a timely and coordinated manner to a regional emergency.D. Preparedness activities 1. Public Works has pre-identified transportation routes that have priority to be inspected and cleared after an incident. ESF 1 Transportation - 3 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 2. Coordinate and maintain a method of identifying available transportation resources with supporting organizations. 3. Maintain the City’s fleet of vehicles and obtain fuel for same. 4. Develop an inventory of transportation resources and other equipment. 5. Maintain liaison through the City EOC with supporting City departments, local jurisdictions and other agencies as necessary. 6. Maintain adequate resources and supplies, replenishing stockpiles as require. 7. Establish and maintain liaison with contactors, construction, and equipment rental companies. 8. Develop comprehensive contingency plans for detour routes and appropriate changes to traffic control devices in coordination with the Police Department and other departments as needed to ensure the transportation system can support appropriate response and recovery efforts in an incident.E. Response 1. Coordinate the mobilization of Public Works personnel and equipment necessary for the assessment of transportation systems. 2. Organize, provide, and assist in damage assessments of, waste water treatment and collection systems, flood control and storm drainage facilities , roads, bridges, parking ramps, , and equipment. . 3. 4. 5. ft Provide staff to the City Emergency Operations Center (EOC) as needed upon activation. Provide and report Damage Assessment (DA) status of the City of Rochester’s road and bridge facilities, structures and conveyances. Organize, set department response priorities, and coordinate with the City EOC. ra 6. Coordinate and control incident-related traffic in conjunction with the City Police Department, and other departments when necessary. 7. Coordinate transportation related missions in support of the City and surrounding jurisdictions as required. 8. Coordinate requests for assistance with the City EOC and other private and public agencies as necessary. DF. Recovery Roads and bridges are prioritized for clearing and re-opening. Citizens are advised of road closures and problem areas. Transportation functions and operations are protected and reconstituted as soon as possible following an incident. 1. Furnish personnel, heavy equipment, engineering support and supplies to assist the City with incident operations. 2. Conduct detailed damage assessments of the transportation systems and facilities and create After Action and Lessons Learned Reports. 3. Coordinate the reconstruction and repairs of the City transportation system, including the designation of alternate routes in coordination with public and private agencies. 4. Coordinate the removal of debris from transportation routes in the City. 5. Identify emergency routes in and out of the City and provide recommendations on traffic routes to the EOC during an incident. 6. Coordinate with public and private organizations to coordinate recovery. ESF 1 Transportation - 4 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 7. Coordinate and provide for the placement of traffic control signs and barricades for road closures, detours and potential road hazards. Provide operational control of signals and flashers under City jurisdiction.VI. ResponsibilitiesA. Primary agency 1. The department of Public Works is responsible for ensuring that transportation functions and operations are protected and repaired as soon as possible following an incident. Assist first responders with equipment and contribute other traffic related supplies and expertise.B. Support agencies 1. Fire Department – emergency medical assistance, fire suppression, evacuation assistance, traffic control (assist RPD when resources are scarce) 2. Police Department – traffic control, evacuation 3. Park and Recreation – remove debris from main arteries 4. 5. ft Finance - Information Services – assist with restoration of IT services City Lines (Private Transportation Services) – evacuation transportation raVII. LogisticsA. Resource requirements 1. The City has considerable resources for handling and responding to incidents. However, in a large-scale incident, the City can request additional resources through the City Emergency Operations Center (EOC). D 2. Emergency contracts are maintained with local contractors for heavy equipment and equipment operators.B. Logistical support 1. Logistical support provided by Public Works, and/or City EOC when activated.VIII. CommunicationsA. Key Agencies and Groups 1. Fire Department. 2. Police Department 3. Parks and Recreation Department 4. Finance (Information Services) 5. City Lines (private transportation company) ESF 1 Transportation - 5 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanB. Primary and Secondary Communication Tools 1. Primary ARMER talk group, with communication patch as needed. 2. Secondary devices will be cell phones. 3. Tertiary systems: HAM radio coordinated by EOC.C. IT support 1. Support for GIS, flood related monitoring systems, wastewater collection system flow monitors, other public works databases, and the like.IX. References 1. City if Rochester’s All Hazards Mitigation Plan (HMP) and Hazards Inventory and Vulnerability Analysis (HIVA) 2. City of Rochester’s Policy on Snow Emergencies 3. Refer to primary and supporting departments’ plans for further information supporting this ESF. ft ra D ESF 1 Transportation - 6 September 14, 2011
    • Emergency Support Function - 2 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan CommunicationsI. ResponsibilitiesPRIMARY AGENCIES: Police Department – Public Safety Communications Center (PSCC)SUPPORT AGENCIES: Information Services – City Information Technology Services – Olmsted County Police Department – Planning and Technology Division Telecommunications Services – Olmsted County CenturyLink (formerly Qwest)II. Overview ft raA. Purpose 1. The Communications Emergency Support Function (ESF) is activated when a significant impact to the communications infrastructure is anticipated or has occurred. It is meant to organize, establish and maintain communication capabilities necessary to meet operational requirements D of the City of Rochester in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from an incident.B. Scope 1. The Rochester Police Department Public Safety Communications Center is designated as the lead agency for coordinating communications and warning of events (or pending events). 2. The Communications ESF describes the coordination of actions to be taken to establish and maintain 911 phone systems, computer and information technology infrastructure, ARMER radio system, and telecommunications system (not 911 phones) devices, in preparation for, response to, and recovery from an incident which effects the population and operation of the City of Rochester. 3. Support for this ESF includes: communication and telecommunication services provided under the National Security Emergency Preparedness procedures for expediting service requirements covered under the Telecommunications Service Priority program (aka GETS). ESF 2 Communications - 1 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanIII. Policies 1. Priority in establishing communications systems within the City is first given to life safety, followed by the re-establishment of essential government functions and the protection of public property. 2. The Director of Emergency Management is authorized to execute special powers in the event of an emergency such as when information systems, and public safety communications support requirements cannot be met. 3. Public Safety Communications Center policies and procedures manual (aka, SOP manual) provides direction and guidance for routine and emergency operationsIV. SituationA. Incident conditions and hazards 1. The sudden and unexpected nature of an incident may result in numerous requests for services ft required to save lives, protect property, and preserve the environment. 2. When the need for communications equipment is the highest, there may be fewer resources, thus requiring a need for reprioritization and reallocation of working systems. ra 3. Communications resources may be overwhelmed, requiring outside assets and assistance.B. Planning assumptions 1. No guarantee of a perfect response system is expressed or implied by this ESF. The City of Rochester will make every reasonable effort to respond based on the situation, information, and D resources available at the time of the incident. 2. Available resources may become limited due to high demand in a large-scale incident. 3. All departments are required to support this ESF as necessary. 4. The City will focus on coordinating lifesaving activities concurrent with reestablishing response and recovery efforts of the affected area(s). The County and State, in conjunction with the telecommunications industry, will accomplish as much restoration and reconstruction of telecommunications facilities as the situation permits. 5. Initial reports of damage may be fragmented, providing an incomplete picture on the extent of damage to telecommunications facilities. 6. Public information and warning is critical to alerting citizens of an impending or ongoing incident (see ESF 15 External Affairs). 7. Weather and other environmental factors may restrict the ability to deploy mobile or transportable telecommunications equipment into the affected area. 8. The Mayor’s Declaration of Emergency will be requested and announced, should the situation warrant. ESF 2 Communications - 2 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanV. Concept of OperationsA. General OperationsIn an incident, the ability to communicate internally among department is critical. Coordination betweenthe Rochester Public Safety Communications Center and the City’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC)will manage resources to responders and recovery teams. Should the incident affect normalcommunications systems, alternate methods including conventional radio VHF, and amateur radio(ARES) may be utilized.B. Procedures 1. According to Ordinance 3956, Chapter 14A of the Rochester Code of Ordinances, the Emergency Management Directorhas primary authority for emergency decision making. 2. Activate the City of Rochester EOC Emergency Operation Plan (EOP). 3. Notify designated amateur radio support - ARES/RACES of EOC activation. Confirm they are available at the City EOC. 4. 5. 6. Contact CenturyLink ft Contact Rochester Police Planning and Technology Division Contact Olmsted County Information Technology Services ra 7. Contact City of Rochester Information Systems Division 8. Contact Olmsted County Telecommunications ConsortiumC. Prevention and mitigation activities 1. Review Olmsted County’s Hazard Mitigation Plan (HMP) as a department and discuss D implementation strategies. 2. Rochester’s Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) is equipped with both an emergency generator and with an uninterrupted power supply (UPS). The UPS batteries supply emergency power to PSAP. Without a generator or commercial power charge, the batteries will provide power for a period of one hour. The generator is capable of supplying power for approximately 72 hours and is dependent upon the amount of fuel supply. • Extra radio and cellular batteries are rotated and kept charged. • The emergency generator is capable of supplying power to vital services including: The City EOC, PSAP, selected outlets, key card security, police records, Council Chambers and information technology servers as required. • Consoletts – dispatch operation consoles for RPD, RFD and OCSD • ARMER radio cacheD. Preparedness activities 1. Monthly Systems Check ESF 2 Communications - 3 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan a. CenturyLink 911 Phone System: PSCC Director schedules system maintenance calls monthly (performed by CenturyLink staff) b. Dispatch Primary PCs: Olmsted County ITS will schedule monthly software/hardware maintenance and will e-mail status reports to PSCC Director, and Planning and Technology Division staff c. Dispatch Secondary PCs: City of Rochester IS will schedule monthly remote software/hardware maintenance and will e-mail status reports to PSCC Director and Planning and Technology Division staff 2. Dispatch Radios: RPD Planning and Technology Division will schedule monthly software/hardware maintenance and will e-mail status reports to PSCC Director 3. Police Department – Rochester Public Safety Communications Center a. Participate in drills and exercises to test the capabilities of ARMER radio system. b. Participate in drills and exercises to test the capabilities of the ARES radio net. c. Maintain operation of Police Department radio equipment owned or used by the City including any contract agreements. d. Train personnel in proper radio protocol, including limiting communications during emergencies and yielding to Incident Command communications. ft e. Subscribe to the Government Emergency Telecommunications Service (GETS) which is offered by the Office of the Manager of the National Communications Systems, to meet national security and emergency preparedness requirements by Federal, State and local ra government and other authorized users. Subscriber cards (with instructions) are issued to Emergency Operations Center selected staff members and are available for use by members of the City’s emergency management organization through those cardholders.E. Response D1. General Response 1. The City of Rochester Emergency Management Staff Duty Officer (Emergency Management Director, or designee) will be notified by the Rochester PSCC Dispatch Supervisor any time the nature of the warning would indicate a widespread hazard to City of Rochester citizens 2. The National Warning System (NAWAS) is the primary system utilized by the federal government to disseminate warning information. Warnings for the City are received at the PSAP which in turn notifies local emergency personnel and the public. 3. Minnesota Duty Officer informs Police PSCC of any hazardous materials incidents reported by Extremely Hazardous Substances 302 sites, and this information is relayed to Fire Battalion Chief, RPD Shift Commander, and City EM Staff Duty Officer 4. In case of partial or total loss of local telephone communication services, Information Services will coordinate repair and restoration. 5. ARMER radio cache will be accessed and distributed to response agencies as needed ESF 2 Communications - 4 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan2. Police Department - Rochester Public Safety Communications Center 1. The Dispatch Center is responsible for the overall direction and control of emergency communications related to the 911, E911 and Police ARMER radio system during an incident. When conditions warrant, the Rochester Police Public Safety Communications Center Supervisor or another dispatcher will activate the City EOC talk group. 2. Arrange additional communications capabilities when necessary. 3. Establish restoration priorities for emergency telephone and radio systems in conjunction with the Incident Commander, or Emergency Management Director (or designee) when City EOC is activated 4. Coordinate the restoration of ARMER and secondary radio capabilities 5. Recommend relocation or redistribution of radio resources used by first responders and EOC supporting agencies as necessary to most effectively maintain adequate communications in emergency situations. 6. Disseminate warning information received through NAWAS, EAS, the National Weather Service, and from Minnesota Duty Officer to local emergency officials in accordance with standard operating guidelines.3. Information Services ft ra 1. Advise the City EOC on status and capability of emergency communications systems. 2. Provide telecommunications and information system staff with equipment and system assistance, as available and in accordance with the department’s primary mission. 3. Assure that communications systems can be utilized from or to the EOC and mobile facilities. 4. Establish restoration priorities for emergency telephones in cooperation with the Incident Commander. D 5. Conduct damage assessments of City computers, all of the City’s technical appliances, the intranet system and any other electronic related equipment; initiate repairs and mitigation activities of such equipment. 6. Coordinate use and distribution of loaned cell phones during incidents; provides a cellular telephone roster as part of the City-wide directory in the EOC. 7. Arrange for additional communications capabilities when necessary.F. Recovery1. Police Department - Dispatch Center 1. Maintain coordination with the EAS and RACES systems. 2. Maintain operation of radio equipment owned or used by the City of Rochester Police Department, including any contract agreements. 3. Create After-Action Reports and Lessons Learned Reports. ESF 2 Communications - 5 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan2. Information Services 1. Coordinate the restoration of City government telephone computer systems and networks. 2. Activated telecommunications and information systems will continue to support recovery operations, as required. 3. Restore telecommunications and information system infrastructure and systems not used in response activities when full services are available to the City. 4. Create After-action Reports and Lessons Learned ReportsVI. ResponsibilitiesA. Primary agency 1. Police PSCC is responsible for ensuring the functioning of communication systems and the dissemination of response information during an incident 2. Policy and procedures for dispatch operationsB. Support agencies 1. ft General System Support/Problem Determination (County ITS) ra 2. Primary Dispatch PC Support (County ITS) 3. Auxiliary Dispatch PC Support (City IT) 4. PSPortal BCA System Support (County IT) 5. Data Switch and Fiber Connections – PSAP (City IS), Backup PSAP (County IT) – also based on County or City switches D 6. Dispatch Voice ARMER Radio System (RPD Planning and Technology Division) 7. 911 Phone System (CenturyLink – formerly Qwest) 8. Building Maintenance/Systems (County) 9. Voice and Data Cable Installation/Integrity (County) 10. EOC Security Key Card Access (RPD Services Division) 11. PSCC key card security (County Administration)VII. LogisticsA. Resource requirements 1. The City Emergency Operations Center (EOC) has capabilities contained in: a. Emergency Operations Plan (EOP). b. Radio links to: i. Rochester & Olmsted County Fire & Fire Mutual Aid ii. Rochester Police and Olmsted County Sheriff ESF 2 Communications - 6 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan iii. Rochester Public Works iv. Olmsted County Office of Emergency Management v. Ambulance companies 2. ARES - Two way communication by voice, HF, UHF, VHF, ATV, & Packet. 3. City of Rochester website: www.rochestermn.gov 4. Rochester-Alert website: http://alerts.rochestermn.govB. Logistical support 1. Police PSCC handles logistical support for most incidents 2. In large incidents, logistical support is provided by City EOC Logistics SectionVIII. CommunicationsA. Key Agencies and Groups 1. Radio and telephone communications are needed to relay informationB. Primary and Secondary Communication Tools ft ra 1. ARMER radio talk groups 2. Secondary devices include… 3. ARES (Ham) radio operations will provide services as the third line of communications support.C. IT support D 1. See section VI (B) on page 6 of this ESFIX. References 1. Refer to primary and supporting departments’ plans for further information supporting this ESF. ESF 2 Communications - 7 September 14, 2011
    • Emergency Support Function - 3 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Public Works and EngineeringI. ResponsibilitiesPRIMARY AGENCY: Public Works DepartmentSUPPORT AGENCIES: Fire Department Police Department Finance (Information Services) Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT) Parks and Recreation Department ft Minnesota Pollution Control Authority (MPCA) raII. Overview A. Purpose The purpose of Emergency Support Function (ESF) 3, Public Works and Engineering, is to provide D guidance for the emergency coordination of public works and engineering services for debris removal, inspection of public infrastructure for damage and structural safety and for issuing contracts for the demolition of unsafe public infrastructure and the temporary repair of essential infrastructure. ESF 3 includes emergency activities for solid waste, flood management, and surface water. B. Scope 1. The City of Rochester’s Public Works Department Is responsible for this ESF. Public Works maintains City roadways and bridges including signage and postings, wastewater treatment facilities, public parking ramps and lots, City sanitary sewer collection and storm drainage systems, flood management facilities, as well as providing inspections and permit functions. Public Works coordinates emergency restoration of critical public facilities, including the temporary and permanent restoration of, roads, bridges, wastewater collection and treatment systems. Support includes construction management and inspection, emergency contracting and technical advice, and evaluations. ESF 3 Public Works - 1 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 2. A Public Works representative is sent to the City of Rochester Emergency Operations Center (EOC) upon activation. When requested, other City departments are activated to provide support of personnel, equipment, and/or technical advice. 3. Manage flood control structures, including (but not limited to) levees and flood control reservoirsIII. Policies 1. The City of Rochester provides public works services to lands, facilities and utilities under City jurisdiction. Response to private property problems is conducted when a City facility is causing a problem or when life or public health is threatened. Public Works response outside of the City is facilitated through the City EOC, or as requested by Mn Duty Officer on a case-by-case assessment. 2. Incident response actions include steps to minimize or eliminate risk to endangered species or to minimize risk to their habitats. 3. ft Projects may require completion of an Environmental Assesment Worksheet or permit before final approval. In some incidents, environmental review and permits may be waived or orally approved. ra 4. The Public Works Department may advise or otherwise direct any other public or private utilities located in city right-of-way and operating under City, state or federal restrictions, or under any incident restrictions or operating policies established by City government. 5. Permitting and normal inspection procedures stay in effect following an incident unless determined otherwise during a State of Emergency declaration. 6. The Public Works Department is responsible for initial inspection, repair, and operation of all D city owned public infrastructure and to those other governmental agencies where there are contractual agreements to manage facilities. 7. Public Works may receive State and / or federal loans or garnts for the funding of some or all of its emergency projects.IV. Situation A. Incident conditions and hazards 1. See the Olmsted County Hazard Vulnerability Analysis (HVA) and All Hazards Mitigation Plan (AHMP) for a description of potential emergency conditions and vulnerable populations. 2. Flooding 3. Severe winter weather ESF 3 Public Works - 2 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan B. Planning assumptions 1. No guarantee of a perfect response system is expressed or implied by this ESF. The City of Rochester Public Works Department will make every reasonable effort to respond based on the situation, information, and resources available at the time of the incident. 2. Available resources may become limited due to high demand in a large-scale incident. 3. All city departments are required to support this ESF as necessary. 4. Activities related to emergency road repairs and closures, debris, snow, and ice clearance are addressed in ESF 1 Transportation. Access to the incident area is dependent upon the establishment of ground, air, and water routes. A rapid assessment of the event area is made in order to determine critical response issues and emergency response priorities. Response is coordinated through the City Emergency Operations Center (EOC). Gathering and compiling of information and coordination of emergency assistance also occurs at the City EOC. 5. Support agencies perform tasks under their own authorities as applicable, in addition to tasks received under the authority of this Plan. 6. Previously inspected structures may require a re-evaluation should subsequent events occur after the initial incident, or if the results of the initial inspection were inconclusive. 7. 8. ft Vehicle fueling and dispensing systems may be affected in the event of an incident. Alternate back-up systems have been established. Critical City facilities are self-sufficient for at least three days. The City will support the efforts ra of employees to communicate with their families and return home as needed. 9. Basic needs such as water, wastewater, refrigeration, and emergency electrical power may be not be available to the general public due to loss of public and private utility services. This ESF is responsible for facilitating communication and coordination of emergency restoration of the public utility services and public infrastructure. D 10. City departments will perform tasks under their own authorities as applicable, in addition to tasks received under the authority of this Plan.V. Concept of Operations A. General Operations 1. The Public Works Department is responsible for the coordination of this ESF. 2. The Public Works Department is responsible for providing public works and engineering assistance, as resources permit, to meet city needs related to emergencies and disasters. ESF 3 Public Works - 3 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanB. General Procedures 1. Overall command and control for Public Works Maintenance and Operations is established at the City Public Works and Transit Operations Center (PWTOC). 2. If an incident occurs during non-working hours or if the PWTOC is unusable, the Public Works employees are instructed to follow their department’s internal personnel policy regarding their reporting to work or to an alternate work site. 3. When the immediate life safety needs of employees are met, personnel will assess the department, what resources are needed, and the department operational status. An initial status report will be sent to the City EOC concerning the status of employees, equipment, resources, and facilities. 4. Emergency repairs of City owned facilities, structures and infrastructure will be a priority. Repairs will be based upon critical need as determined as follows: a. Buildings that house critical response units or staff b. Roads, streets or bridges that act as main evacuation routes c. Public facilities that serve or may need to serve as shelters d. Facilities providing essential services to the public (water, sewer, etc.) ft e. Facilities used or needed to provide for emergency public information f. Debris clearance in right-of-way and from other public property. raC. Public Works Procedures 1. Notify appropriate Public Works Ememrgency Operations staff. . 2. Identify support departments who may need to supply expertise to the Public Works D Department. 3. Establish communication with appropriate City Departments and the City EOC. 4. Upon detection of a wastewater release or overflow incident, make an internal assessment of the situation. If it is determined that the incident is of regional significance, MPCA through Mn Duty Officer. 5. Maintain operations of the public wastewater treatment, sanitary sewer collection pumping, storage and collection systems and assist in meeting public sanitation needs and control sewage pollution to the environment. 6. Communicate health and environmental issues to the City EOC. 7. Address solid waste and debris management issues including: a. Temporary debris storage sights b. Mutual aid agreements c. Review of available resources d. Review of contracts already in place e. Requirements of regulatory agencies ESF 3 Public Works - 4 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan f. Monitoring data g. Contamination implications (i.e. biomedical, radioactive) h. Identifying locations/facilities that can accept contaminated waste. 8. Maintain passable vehicular circulation on priority routes. 9. Maintain operation of fuel dispensing equipment and ensure adequate fuel supply for City owned vehicles and equipment. 10. Provide damage assessments for City property, wastewater treatment, sanitary sewer and storm water collection systems, street and City owned equipment. 11. Provide for priority restoration of critical Infrastructure. 12. Provide information related to emergency public information through the City EOC regarding matters of public health and hazards related to damaged public infrastructure. 13. Provide for or contract for major recovery work, debris clearance, and/or services as appropriate. 14. Coordinate repair operations with outside agencies as appropriate. 15. Recommend emergency ingress/egress for responders, including access points to emergency responders.D. Prevention and mitigation activities ft ra 1. Review the County’s All Hazards Mitigation Plan (AHMP) as a department and discusses implementation strategies. 2. Implement hazard mitigation in the development of policy, issuing of permits and the design and construction of City facilities, including flood control, storm and sanitary sewer facilities and structures. This mitigation program will include the designation of methods to support D emergency power sources for City sewer pumping stations and fuel supplies necessary to Public Works operations. 3. Mitigate emergencies and disasters through engineering, building and land use codes, and inspections of buildings and structures. 4. Identify opportunities to lessen the effects of future emergencies or disasters and make them known to all City departments or other organizations that could be impacted.E. General Preparedness activities 1. Ensure personnel and equipment are protected from the effects of incidents by: • Developing general safety guidelines for use in Incident Action Plans based on operational objectives. ESF 3 Public Works - 5 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan • Establishing Continuity of Operations Plans (COOPs) and mutual aid agreements to carry out City and department essential functions. • Participating in incident planning and exercise activities throughout the year. • Becoming familiar with area specific hazards and risks.F. Public Works Preparedness activities 1. Develop policies and procedures for incident response and recovery for public works activities. 2. Develop a continuity plan in accordance with the City’s COG plan for departmental services recovery and restoration. 3. Ensure that field personnel have training, proper protection and equipment necessary for response to an incident. 4. Closely monitor equipment related to the proper functioning utilities and systems. 5. Provide regular training to staff for home and work incident preparedness. 6. Ensure that adequate emergency supplies and equipment are available for division staff. 7. Maintain liaison with City departments, support agencies listed in this ESF, and other organizations. 8. 9. 10. ft Work with neighboring jurisdictions to establish mutual aid and inter-local agreements. Provide and participate in training, drills, and exercises in support of this ESF. Provide employees with emergency response policies and procedural materials, such as this ra ESF and the City EOC Emergency Operations Plan (EOP).G. Response 1. Activate the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) if necessary. 2. Organize, provide, and assist in damage assessments of, waste water treatment and collection D systems, flood control and storm drainage facilities , roads, bridges, parking ramps, , and equipment. 3. Identify emergency routes in and out of the City and provide recommendations on traffic routes during an incident. 4. Coordinate with RPD and provide for the placement of traffic control signs and barricades for road closures, detours and potential road hazards. Provide operational control of signals and flashers under City jurisdiction. 5. Monitor for contamination of grouns and surface water supply systems and maintain the operation of public wastewater treatment and collection and pumping systems, assist in meeting public sanitation needs, and control wastewater pollution to the environment. 6. Communicate emergency information through the EOC regarding matters of public health, safety, and environmental hazards. 7. Provide and/or contract for construction equipment, supplies, and personnel. 8. Perform and/or contract recovery work to restore damaged facilities. ESF 3 Public Works - 6 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 9. Coordinate with support agencies and neighboring jurisdictions to supply requested services and resources. 10. Provide advice and assistance with debris clearing, emergency protective measures, and emergency disposal procedures. H. Recovery 1. Continue with recovery activities including the reconstitution of the Department’s essential functions and services. 2. Additional resources or assistance may be obtained through existing mutual aid agreements. 3. Any requests for external agency personnel, equipment or materials should be coordinated through the City EOC. 4. Additional resources or assistance may be obtained through contracts with private firms. 5. Coordinate with public and private utilities/businesses responsible for electricity, natural gas, telephone, and cable through the City EOC as necessary. 6. Provide documentation of costs incurred for the incident actions of Public Works activities. 7. Implement mitigation processes as required to support essential services. 8. 9. ft Resume normal working activities. Create After-Action Reports and Lessons Learned Reports. raVI. Responsibilities A. Primary agency 1. The Public Works Department is responsible for the emergency coordination of of public D works and engineering services for debris removal, inspection of public infrastructure for damage and structural safety and for issuing contracts for the demolition of unsafe public infrastructure and the temporary repair of essential infrastructure. B. Support agencies 1. Fire Department 2. Police Department 3. Parks and Recreation Department 4. Minnesota Pollution Control Authority 5. Minnesota Department of Transportation ESF 3 Public Works - 7 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanVII. Logistics A. Resource requirements 1. Assets at our disposal from other public agencies / municipalities and those assets available from the private sector. B. Logistical support 1. Logistical support provided by Public Works, and/or City EOC when activated.VIII. Communications A. Primary communications for response operations 1. Initial response operations will remain on common tactical talk group 2. Suppport agencies will be ft a. Directed to a Tactical Talk Group (e.g. – “Olmsted P Tac xx”) b. Or, patched by Rochester/Olmsted PSAP to to primary agency tactical talk group ra B. Extended operations communications plan 1. EOC Planning Section will determine operating talk groups 2. On ICS 215 form, list the operational talk groups and period of operations (e.g. – 12 or 24 hours) C. IT support D 1. Support for GIS, flood related monitoring systems, wastewater collection system flow monitors, other public works databases, and the like.IX. References 1. Debris Removal Annex 2. Flood Response Procedures for Storm Water Management 3. Reservoir Flood Warning Contingency Plan (also, see ESF 15) 4. Established mutual aid agreements between the City of Rochester and outside entities. Mutual aid agreements should establish supplemental public works assistance. Assistance is obtained from the private sector via the EOC. 5. Olmsted County All Hazards Mitigation Plan (AHMP) and Hazard Vulnerability Analysis (HVA) ESF 3 Public Works - 8 September 14, 2011
    • Emergency Support Function - 4 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan FirefightingI. Responsibilities PRIMARY AGENCY: Rochester Fire Department SUPPORT AGENCIES: Rochester Police Department Gold Cross Ambulance Service Public WorksII. OverviewA. Purpose ft The purpose of Emergency Support Function 4 is to provide for citywide coordination of fire prevention, rasuppression and control within the City of Rochester. This ESF will also provide for the coordinated useof fire department resources in handling urban, rural and wild land fires, which could result from anatural disaster, such as flood or tornado.B. Scope DThis ESF deals with fighting fires beyond normal field operations in the City of Rochester. This includescoordinating resource assistance of other agencies through local mutual aid agreements and thestatewide Fire Mobilization Plan.The plan establishes a mutual understanding of authority, responsibilities and functions of localgovernment, and provides a basis for incorporating non-governmental organizations (NGOs) into theresponse and recovery process. All directions contained herein apply to preparedness measures andincident actions undertaken by the City of Rochester and other supporting organizations as may berequired to minimize the effects of large scale incidents. 1. The Fire Department is the primary department for all fire service, emergency medical services (EMS) and rescue activities. 2. The City of Rochester Fire Department has five Stations. 3. Firefighting activities involve the: a. Management and coordination of firefighting activities. ESF 4 Firefighting - 1 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan b. Detection and suppression of fires on City and private property. c. Providing personnel, equipment, and supplies to support the City and other local jurisdictions involved in urban and urban interface firefighting as well as light urban search and rescue operations.III. Policies 1. The guidelines established in the City of Rochester Fire Departments Standard Operating Guidelines (SOGs) shall be followed in responding to an incident. 2. The City of Rochester has adopted the International Fire Code (IFC) and operates accordingly.IV. SituationA. Incident conditions and hazards See the Olmsted Countys Hazard Identification and Vulnerability Analysis (HIVA) and All Hazards 1. ft Mitigation Plan (AHMP) for a description of potential emergency conditions and vulnerable populations. 2. Fires resulting from a natural or man-made incident may be fueled by ignition sources that are ra of little concern under normal conditions. The damage potential from fires in urban areas during and after a large-scale incident may exceed the damages of the initial hazard. 3. Large-scale incidents, such as tornados, may create simultaneous rescue situations caused by widespread structural and geologic integrity issues. 4. Available firefighting and mutual aid resources will be difficult to obtain and utilize due to D disruption in communications, transportation, utilities, and water systems.B. Planning assumptions 1. No guarantee of a perfect response system is expressed or implied by this ESF. The City of Rochester will make every reasonable effort to respond based on the situation, information, and resources available at the time of the incident. 2. Available resources may become limited due to high demand in a large-scale incident. 3. All departments are required to support this ESF as necessary. 4. Land-line communications may be interrupted. Radio communications may be relied upon heavily and are through established channels. 5. Wheeled-vehicle access may be hampered by such occurrences as falling trees and power lines, bridge failures and flood waters, making conventional travel to the fire location extremely difficult or impossible. 6. The Fire Department may receive urgent requests from non-fire-related departments for personnel, equipment, and supplies. These supplies may be limited or unavailable. ESF 4 Firefighting - 2 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 7. The Fire Department has mutual aid agreements with numerous agencies throughout Olmsted County. Requests for assistance are through existing mutual aid Agreements. In situations where mutual aid is not available, requests are coordinated through the City Emergency Operations Center (EOC). 8. Fire and Life Safety response times may be delayed due to disruptions and debris from the incident; responses to occurrences will be prioritized. 9. Support normally given by electric, gas and water utility companies may be hampered by the magnitude of the incident. Utility failures, such as the disruption of water supply for firefighting, may compound, or add to the size of the incident.V. Concept of OperationsA. General OperationsThe Fire Department manages and coordinates firefighting and rescue activities. During an incident, theindividual incident commanders are responsible for conducting situation and damage assessments as ftwell as for determining resource needs with the City EOC. Should requests for additional firefightingassistance and resources need to be made, they will be coordinated by the activated City EOC.B. Procedures ra 1. In an incident, the Fire Department’s Standard Operating Guidelines (SOGs) are implemented as are other plans and documents when necessary. 2. The Fire Department maintains the departmental Standard Operating Guidelines (SOGs) for managing response and recovery activities in relation to this ESF. D 3. The notification method used to mobilize off-duty personnel is by pager. Backup notification is by telephone or emergency public information procedures. 4. The Fire Chief, or his designee, provides direction and control over department resources and coordination with the City EOC. City department personnel operate according to specific directives, department Standard Operating Guidelines (SOGs) and by exercising reasonable personal judgment when unusual or unanticipated situations arise and command guidance is not available. 5. The Fire on-scene Incident Commanders provide regular status reports through the chain of command to the City EOC. 6. The coordination of resources and requests for assistance are through the City EOC. 7. On-scene management of an incident follows the Incident Command System (ICS). ESF 4 Firefighting - 3 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanC. Prevention and mitigation activities 1. Review Olmsted County All Hazard Mitigation Plan (AHMP) as a department and discusses implementation strategies. 2. The Fire Chief or his designate manages and enforces the Fire Prevention Program and Fire Codes including but not limited to: • All applicable local, State, and federal fire and life safety codes. • Developing and preparing of amendments to fire and building codes, reflecting solutions to the latest trends and techniques in building construction. • Organizing fire and life safety inspections of all applicable occupancies and fire protection systems and appliances. • Overseeing the investigation of all fires. • Providing plan review services for all new construction and tenant improvements. • Reviewing zoning changes, lot divisions, and devising solutions to diverse land development projects. • Maintaining the fire management data processing systems for fire prevention programs and the preservation of records. 3. Public Education and Training ft • Provide fire safety information to public and private entities and organizations. • Conduct community education and emergency preparedness programs. ra • Coordinate the education of fire personnel using the latest information, techniques, and programs for the prevention of injuries, prevention of fires, and reduction of property damage, as a result of natural and/or man-made causes.D. Preparedness activities D 1. Become familiar with this ESF and Emergency Operations Plan (EOP). 2. Train personnel in firefighting using established standards. 3. Develop a list of resources, which includes apparatus, equipment, personnel, and supply sources.E. Response 1. Assume full responsibility for suppression of fires burning on or threatening City- owned lands. 2. Task personnel to accomplish fire suppression, emergency medical services (EMS), and rescue responsibilities. 3. Activate and staff the City EOC as required. 4. Perform windshield surveys and preliminary damage assessments (PDA). Report findings to the City EOC. ESF 4 Firefighting - 4 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 5. Assist in emergency road clearing, if necessary, when responding to an incident. 6. Upon request, provide support to utility restoration efforts. 7. Provide response to hazardous material occurrences. 8. If available to do so, provide support in the dissemination of emergency warning information to the public and assist in providing direction and control for evacuation efforts. 9. Provide and coordinate firefighting assistance with other jurisdictions per existing mutual aid agreements. 10. Support operations through requests and coordination of resources unavailable through mutual aid. 11. Utilize Olmsted County mutual aid when appropriate. 12. Participate in the implementation of the Minnesota State Fire Service Intrastate Mutual Aid Plan when appropriate.F. Recovery 1. Contribute to the damage assessment process. Report findings to the City EOC. 2. Provide regular status reports and information regarding operational and resource needs to the City EOC. ft 3. Coordinate the documentation and reporting of incident-related expenditures to the City EOC or Emergency Management Division if the EOC is not activated. ra 4. Create After-Action Reports and Lessons Learned Reports; forward to the Fire Department Emergency Management Division.VI. Responsibilities DA. Primary agency 1. Manage and support firefighting activities, and rescue activities.B. Support agencies 1. Consider Gold Cross for EMS support, RPU for utility assistance, and Police for traffic control.VII. LogisticsA. Resource requirements 1. Primary and support departments provide the required personnel, facilities, and equipment to support activities in this ESF. ESF 4 Firefighting - 5 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 2. Local jurisdiction, regional, and national fire suppression resources may be required. The specific resources available are listed in the appropriate mobilization guides. Support organizations exist at each level of government to provide these assets.B. Logistical support 1. Consider where logistical support is gathered (911, EOC, mutual aid).VIII. CommunicationsA. Key Agencies and Groups 1. Communications via ARMER radio is achieved by patching (from LEC Dispatch) 2. In large incidents, communications is achieved by switching to common talk groupsB. Primary and Secondary Communication Tools • Primary will be ARMER talk groups ft ra • Secondary devices will be depended upon if the primary system is inoperable. • Emergency management will provide ARES (Ham) radio operations as the third line of communications support.C. IT support D 1. Information technology is needed to complete operations. Information technology includes apparatus computers, air cards, printers, GIS maps, and the like.IX. References • Minnesota State Fire Chiefs Association, Fire Service Intrastate Mutual Aid Plan • Olmsted County All Hazard Mitigation Plan (AHMP) and Hazard Inventory and Vulnerability Assessment (HIVA) • Refer to primary and supporting departments’ plans for further information supporting this ESF ESF 4 Firefighting - 6 September 14, 2011
    • Emergency Support Function - 5 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Emergency ManagementI. ResponsibilitiesPRIMARY AGENCY: Emergency Management Division (Fire)SUPPORT AGENCIES: All City Departments Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD) Mayo Clinic Amateur Radio Emergency Services (ARES)II. OverviewA. Purpose ft raThe purpose of Emergency Support Function (ESF) 5 provides guidance in ensuring that the City ofRochester is prepared to handle and respond to an emergency, or disaster.B. Scope DThis ESF establishes practices and procedures to ensure incident preparedness for the City of Rochester.By understanding Rochester’s hazards, risks, and vulnerabilities, emergency management can prepare aplan that acknowledges them and can train City staff on their roles and responsibilities, andcommunicate mitigation and preparedness strategies to the general community.The establishment and routine maintenance of the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is a primaryresponsibility of Emergency Management. Equipping the EOC with reliable communication devices andother tools that support incident response are critical in ensuring incidents can be managed andresponded to in an efficient manner.III. PoliciesCity employees and staff will be trained on emergency preparedness and response strategies. Specificstaff will be trained on Emergency Operations Center (EOC) activation and operational proceduresthrough activities and exercise set forth by City of Rochester Emergency Management (COREM).ESF 5 Emergency Management 1 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan1. To ensure preparedness for an incident, City of Rochester Emergency Management requires all City departments to keep record of their emergency supplies, needs, and emergency-trained employees.2. Regular updates and evaluations of this Plan and other incident related plans such as the Emergency Operation Plan (EOP) and the Hazard Mitigation Plan (HMP) are to be constructed following State and federal guidelines and procedures.3. The Director of Emergency Management has the authority to establish priorities, and make and issue rules and regulations related to the protection of life and property affected by the incident. These rules and regulations must be approved by the Mayor and the City Council at the earliest practical time (See Municipal Ordinance 14A).IV. SituationA. Incident conditions and hazards 1. See the City of Rochester’s Hazards Identification and Vulnerability Analysis (HIVA) and Hazard Mitigation Plan for a description of potential emergency conditions and vulnerable populations.B. Planning assumptions ft ra 1. No guarantee of a perfect response system is expressed or implied by this ESF. The City of Rochester will make every reasonable effort to respond based on the situation, information, and resources available at the time of the incident. 2. Available resources may become limited due to high demand in a large-scale incident. 3. All departments are required to support this ESF as necessary (See Municipal Code 14A). D 4. Essential employees are aware of their duties and responsibilities to the Emergency Operations Center (EOC), as well as their own department. 5. Staff reporting to the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is competent in their roles and understand the functions of the EOC and Incident Command System (ICS). 6. Early in the incident little information may be available and the information received in the City EOC may be vague and inaccurate. 7. The central source of information gathering occurs at the City EOC in order to compare and determine validity. 8. Documentation of all information is standardized on appropriate forms and reports.V. Concept of OperationsA. General Operations 1. Organization of Emergency Management a. Rochester Fire Department staffs the Emergency Management DivisionESF 5 Emergency Management 2 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan i. Fire Chief is designated as the City Emergency Management Director ii. Deputy Emergency Management Director performs full time duties related to emergency management iii. Assistance is provided by additional Deputy EM Directors from Fire and Police departments b. Emergency Operations Center i. EOC staff are provided by City departments, VOAD, key emergency management partners ii. EOC Command Team coordinates disaster response through EOC Section Chiefs and Command Staff c. Emergency Management Staff Duty Officer i. EM Director or Deputy Director assigns Staff Duty Officers who provide 24/7 duty coverage ii. See Staff Duty Officer SOG for duties and responsibilities 2. Cycle of Operations: Active response ft Demobilize ra Early Recovery incident D Applying Pre- lessons incident learned a. Pre-incident activities include preparedness (planning, training, exercises) and pre- disaster mitigation activities. b. Early incident refers to two functions: 1) Situational awareness performed by Emergency Management Staff Duty Officer (monitoring weather, alerts of chemical spills, and the like); 2) Early activation of the EOC c. Active Response is EOC activation either limited manner or full response, as deemed by the nature and type of incident d. Demobilze is stepping down operations of the EOC e. Recovery includes the constellation of activities such as mental health care, financial cost recovery, and other community recovery measuresESF 5 Emergency Management 3 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan f. Applying lessons learned is gained from After Action Reviews and Improvement PlansB. Procedures 1. Emergency Management Staff Duty Officer maintains situational awarenss of hazards, issue alerts and warnings to public, and alert EOC response groups 2. When activated, representatives from required departments will report to the EOC to assist in incident response and recovery. 3. The departments and volunteer emergency workers located in the City EOC work to meet the information requirements of the City EOC. This may include receiving or running periodic reports to or from departments, field staff, section chiefs, and local citizens. Essential information includes: a. Boundaries of the incident area and political jurisdictions impacted b. Number of dead or injured persons c. Social/economic/political impacts d. Status of communication systems e. Status of transportation systems g. Ingress/egress routes h. Shelters i. Weather data ft f. Hazard Type and hazard specific information ra j. Status of critical facilities k. Status of reconnaissance activities (air and ground) l. Status of key personnel m. Status of emergency proclamation(s) n. Major activities/issues of ESFs o. Resource needs/shortfalls D p. Overall priorities for response q. Status of donations 4. Information collected provides a basis for: a. Developing and revising City EOC operational objectives b. Briefing City EOC representatives, policy staff, and elected officials c. Development of City EOC Situation Reports d. Allocation of resources e. Requests for assistance and proclamations f. Overall damage assessment 5. Decision making a. Decisions are made with the best information available at the time b. Decisions are not cast in stone and can be changed at any time as more information becomes available 6. Action – implementing the decision a. Make clear assignments b. Determine who is best to complete the assignment c. Give them time to implement and complete the assignment 7. Review a. Constantly review information, decisions, and desired actionsESF 5 Emergency Management 4 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan b. If actions not going as expected i. Provide more resources to complete the assignment ii. Change the assignment to get different results iii. Abandon assignment to follow a more desired course of actionC. Prevention and mitigation activities 1. Routine updates of City plans related to hazards, risks, response and mitigation strategies create awareness of critical areas and enforce plan implementation into other City plans. 2. Work together with other city deparments to provide information and expertise in hazard mitigation and planning for the benefit of the community. 3. Review the Hazard Mitigation Plan (HMP) as needed.D. Preparedness activities 1. Coordinate community and educational outreach programs. 2. Coordinate preparedness exercises and drills with City departments and their staff. 3. Recommend mutual aid agreements as well as ordinances, resolutions, rules and regulations for 4. and resiliency. ft adoption by Common Council that may improve incident preparedness, response, mitigation, Develop training, exercises, and planning for all hazards. ra 5. Assist in coordination of local emergency volunteer programs such as Citizen Corps Council, CERT, ARES, CAPS, and RNeigbors, as appropriate. 6. Maintain and manage an alert warning, and information notification system. 7. Manage and maintain the EOC. DE. Response 1. Notify the State Duty Officer of any activation or demobilization of the Rochester City EOC. 2. Upon activation of the City EOC, notify all appropriate departments per the EOC Activation Plan. 3. Manage the EOC according to the three operational goals: a. Create and maintain situational awareness b. Coordinate information c. Manage resources 4. Prepare the local Proclamation of Emergency for the Mayor to sign and approve. 5. Communicate any requests for assistance (RFAs) through the City EOC.ESF 5 Emergency Management 5 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanF. Recovery 1. Provide information guidance on all appropriate forms and instructions to all City departments for the retention of information and supporting data and procedure for forwarding operational reporting information to the City EOC. 2. Continue to gather and disseminate information, as necessary. 3. Review department completed After-Action Reports and Improvement Plans. 4. Review and revise reporting procedures and formats, as necessary. 5. Collect and prepare reports required to support requests for assistance (RFAs). 6. Participate in preparedness, submit, and track all documentation necessary for State and federal reimbursement of presidentially declared disasters.VI. ResponsibilitiesA. Primary agency 1. agencies as required.B. Support agencies ft Ensure that appropriate reports are generated and forwarded to the County, State, and federal ra 1. Perform a Rapid Risk Assessment and report results to the EOC. 2. Report the situation, operational readiness, and resources required to the necessary departments and external agencies. DVII. LogisticsA. Resource requirements 1. People a. Adequate staffing for the EOC to perform functions outlined in this ESF 2. Resource manual a. Use of DisasterLAN resource system to provide access to pre-identified resource needsB. Logistical support 1. LEC Dispatch a. Initial logistical support for incidents flows from LEC Dispatch 2. EOC a. Disasters and complex emergency incidents overwhelm the capability for LEC Dispatch keep up with resource requestsESF 5 Emergency Management 6 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan b. Long duration events require specialized resource management 3. Departments a. Coordinate logistics with EOC to follow incident priorities and maximize utilizationVIII. CommunicationsA. Key Agencies and GroupsCommunication between field responders, the EOC, and assisting agencies is critical and uses tools described innext sectionB. Primary and Secondary Communication Tools 1. ARMER talk groups a. Police, Fire, Public Works, Parks and Recreation, RPU, Building Safety, and vital non-city agencies, such as Gold Cross b. Use ARMER radios using talk group assigned by the communications plan 2. Telephone ft c. Use ARMER cache to assign radios to groups for priority communication a. [24/7] City EOC answered by Staff Duty Officer (SDO) when EOC inactive b. Program the EOC Option for the SDO line by pressing the SAC 82111 key on any of the ra EOC phone extensions. The key will be shaded to indicate that this is active. Press the key again to deactivate, and calls will go back to the SDO. c. Incoming calls will hear this menu: ““The City of Rochester Emergency Operations Center is now active. Choose from one of the following options: i. See Technical information for SDO Line D 3. DisasterLAN a. Dmail – used for staff members who are logged into DLAN b. Call tickets – used for requests (information, resources, and the like) 4. ARES (Ham) radio operations offer a reliable back-up line of communications support.C. IT support • Initial set-up of EOC • Support for radio systems • Telephone support as needed • Support of emergency management tools – printers, fax, DLAN, siren encoder, Rochester-Alert, and the like • Dark site web page for large scale disastersESF 5 Emergency Management 7 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanIX. References 1. City of Rochester’s Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) 2. City of Rochester’s Hazard Mitigation Plan (HMP) and Hazards Inventory and Vulnerability Analysis 3. Refer to primary and supporting departments’ plans for further information supporting this ESF. 4. Standard Operating Guideline (SOG) for Emergency Management Division Staff Duty Officer 5. Staff Duty Officer manual 6. Technical Information for SDO Line ft ra DESF 5 Emergency Management 8 September 14, 2011
    • Emergency Support Function - 6 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Mass Care, Housing, and Human ServicesI. ResponsibilitiesPRIMARY AGENCY: Emergency Management Division (Fire)SUPPORT AGENCIES: Human Resources Parks and Recreation Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster American Red Cross (ARC) ft Salvation Army raII. OverviewA. PurposeThe purpose of this Emergency Support Function (ESF) is to coordinate efforts to provide emergencyshelter, sleeping areas, feeding, and other relief supplies following an incident. This ESF also supports a Dmass care shelter system that is responsible for coordinating emergency relief supplies and victimreporting and reunification within the City of Rochester.B. Scope 1. The City of Rochester Emergency Management Division will work with local non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to facilitate delivery of mass care services within the City of Rochester. 2. The City of Rochester assumes initial coordination of services according to Minnesota Disaster Recovery Assistance Framework in order to provide mass care response and the efforts of other NGOs, including ARC relief operations. American Red Cross and Salvation Army are primary providers of mass care services. 3. Mass Care includes: a. Dormitory Shelters b. Warming/Cooling Centers c. Feeding d. Emergency First Aid ESF 6 Mass Care, Housing, & Human Services - 1 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan e. Bulk Distribution of Emergency Relief ItemsIII. Policies 1. Assistance is provided using the Minnesota Disaster Recovery Framework 2. Minnesota’s Emergency Management Act (Chapter 12) assigns primary responsibility for citizen care and shelter to the City of Rochester 3. City of Rochester Code of Ordinances 3956, Chapter 14A outlines duty and role of volunteers (14A.08), and legal rights of disaster relief force (14A.09) 4. Federal law: Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act explains requirements for disaster declaration, and authorizes the type of federal assistance that may be providedIV. SituationA. Incident conditions and hazards ft 1. See the Olmsted Countys Hazard Identification and Vulnerability Analysis (HIVA) and All Hazards ra Mitigation Plan (AHMP) for a description of potential emergency conditions and vulnerable populations. 2. Situations include those impacting basic housing and feeding needsB. Planning assumptions D 1. No guarantee of a perfect response system is expressed or implied by this ESF. The City of Rochester will make every reasonable effort to respond based on the situation, information, and resources available at the time of the incident. 2. Local resources and multi-jurisdictional resources are used as available. 3. Services are provided without regard to economic status or racial, religious, political, ethnic, or other affiliation. The priority of providing food and water will be to areas of acute need followed by areas of moderate need. 4. Available resources may become limited due to high demand in a large-scale incident. 5. All departments are required to support this ESF as necessary. 6. A large-scale incident may deprive substantial numbers of people access to the means the prepare food and obtain water. In addition to substantial disruption to the commercial supply and distribution network, an incident may partially or totally destroy food products stored in the affected area. 7. Mass care shelter facilities will receive priority consideration for structural inspections to ensure safety of occupants and the continuation of essential functions. ESF 6 Mass Care, Housing, & Human Services - 2 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 8. It is assumed there is major damage to large numbers of private residences and businesses and that people may be displaced for 72 hours or more. Dormitory Shelters may need to be set up for these people. 9. During an incident, there will be populations requiring special attention. These groups include the elderly and those with disabilities. 10. Feeding, shelter, and emergency first aid services will be provided as soon as the City has the capacity to do so. 11. A high percentage of the water supply may be unusable, requiring juices or potable water supplies to be made available. 12. Sheltering and feeding activities may be required to accommodate victims for a number of days after the onset of the incident. 13. Some victims may go to dormitory shelters, others may find shelter with friends and relatives, and many victims will remain with or near their damaged homes. 14. The magnitude of the incident may require the operation of large long-term shelters as some percentage of the sheltered population will require shelter for an extended period of time. 15. Many of the more seriously injured will be transported to hospitals outside the incident area, 16. ft some of them hundreds of miles away. Some medical facilities may be so over taxed that accurate record keeping on treated, released, hospitalized, and transferred individuals may be impossible. ra 17. The restoration of communication systems, disrupted by damages and overloads, may take weeks.V. Concept of Operations DA. General Operations 1. The City of Rochester Emergency Management Division will work with local non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to facilitate delivery of mass care services within the City of Rochester. 2. Initial Emergency Operations Center (EOC) response activities will focus on meeting urgent needs of victims on a mass care basis. Recovery assistance, such as temporary housing, and loans and grants for individuals under federal disaster assistance programs and the assistance of the American Red Cross may commence as response activities are taking place. 3. Individual assistance and coordination will be the responsibility of City of Rochester in cooperation with Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD), and considered based on the needs of those affected by the incident, the scale and impact of the incident, and available resources. As recovery activities are introduced, close coordination will be required between those responsible for recovery activities, and NGOs providing recovery assistance. 4. The American Red Cross (ARC) and Salvation Army, in cooperation and coordination with Olmsted County and the City of Rochester, may provide mass care to those affected by an incident as part of a broad program of disaster relief. ESF 6 Mass Care, Housing, & Human Services - 3 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 5. Mass Care includes: a. Dormitory Shelters i. The use of designated shelter sites in existing structures, creation of temporary facilities such as tent cities, or the temporary construction of shelters, and use of similar facilities outside the affected area, should evacuation be necessary. These temporary shelters should provide protection from normal weather conditions. b. Warming/Cooling Centers i. In the event of a heat wave, cooling centers with air conditioning and water should be provided for public use. Should an incident occur in the winter months that impacts power or gas heating, warming centers should be established to provide warm areas for those unable to heat their homes. c. Feeding i. Through a combination of fixed sites, mobile feeding units, and bulk food distribution, emergency workers and impacted persons will be provided with food and water. Such operations will be based on sound nutritional standards ft and will include provisions for meeting dietary requirements of those affected with special dietary needs to the extent possible. Should it become necessary, disaster food stamps may be requested from the State. ra d. Emergency First Aid i. Emergency first aid services may be provided to victims and workers at mass care facilities and at designated sites within the affected area. This emergency first aid service is supplemental to emergency health and medical services established to meet the needs of those affected. e. Bulk Distribution of Emergency Relief Items D i. Sites will be established within the affected area for distribution of emergency relief items. The bulk distribution of these relief items will be determined by the urgent needs of those affected by the incident for essential items. 6. Support organizations will be notified and expected to provide 24-hour representation, as necessary. Support organizations’representatives will have sufficient knowledge of the capabilities and resources of their agencies, with appropriate authorities to commit resources to the response and recovery effort. 7. ESF 6 support agencies will notify their essential employees to report to the appropriate locations as designated.B. Procedures 1. Disaster services are in accordance with the City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan (EOP). The Emergency Operations Center, in coordination with City agencies and NGOs will establish emergency feeding, and shelter areas for impacted persons residing in Rochester. Requests for ESF 6 Mass Care, Housing, & Human Services - 4 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan logistical support including: facilities, supplies, equipment, and personnel with be through the EOC.C. Prevention and mitigation activities 1. Conduct a Continuity of Government/Continuity of Operations Plan assessment to determine operating needs of essential government services 2. Assess and implement emergency human services relief programs in coordination with volunteer agencies. 3. Coordinate emergency plans with city-located hospitals and regional health agencies.D. Preparedness activities 1. Plan, develop and coordinate the utilization of City properties for temporary emergency shelters, staging areas, treatment areas, and points of distribution (PODs) 2. Develop partnership plans with Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD) ft 3. Develop plans and procedures for emergency worker shelter operations in coordination with the EOC Command and EOC Recovery Operations section raE. Response 1. Initial response activities focus on meeting urgent mass care needs of those affected by the incident. 2. Coordinate mass care activities with support agencies and volunteer organizations. 3. Operate or coordinate operation of emergency shelters. D 4. Coordinate required mass care services. 5. Provide meals at fixed feeding locations and provide mobile feeding, as required. 6. Coordinate emergency first aid services in shelters, fixed feeding sites, and emergency first aid stations. 7. Provide potable water and ice. 8. Coordinate bulk emergency relief items, as needed. 9. Coordinate shelters and feeding stations. 10. Coordinate transportation and needed supplies with the EOC. 11. Coordinate communications between shelters, feeding stations, points of distribution, and relief operation locations. 12. Provide resources: cots, blankets, and sleeping bags, as requested. 13. Maintain contact with VOAD representatives via the City EOC.F. Recovery 1. Continue to operate emergency worker shelter(s). ESF 6 Mass Care, Housing, & Human Services - 5 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 2. Coordinate the establishment of Disaster Assistance Centers to support community recovery efforts. 3. Create After-Action and Lessons Learned Reports.VI. ResponsibilitiesA. Primary agency 1. Coordinate delivery of services described in this ESFB. Support agencies 1. Provide for the sheltering, feeding, and mass care of persons affected by an incident. 2. Coordinate the provision and distribution of food and water for mass feeding and the provision of transportation to distribute food and water stocks.VII. Logistics ft raA. Resource requirements 1. Support agencies will provide representatives, on a 24-hour basis, to the City EOC and shelter locations as required or requested. 2. Mobilized resources, in support of City mass care activities, may include the transportation of cots and blankets, air mattresses, sleeping bags, portable toilets, water containers, cooking D equipment, registration forms, first aid and shelter medical supplies, vehicles for transport of personnel and supplies, comfort and cleanup kits, portable lamps, generators, fans, office supplies, and tables and chairs. 3. Support organizations or agencies are responsible for their own transportation. 4. Available undamaged facilities may have to be augmented by tents, and mobile homes, from outside the area. 5. All requests for additional assistance, including resources through Mutual Aid Agreements, will be coordinated through the City EOC.B. Logistical support 1. VOAD agencies will be utilized for logistics 2. EOC will coordinate logistical requests 3. Parks and Recreation may provide vehicles and workers to assist with set-up needs ESF 6 Mass Care, Housing, & Human Services - 6 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanVIII. CommunicationsA. Key Agencies and Groups 1. Response and recovery operations are initially coordinated at the City of Rochester EOC in the Recovery Operations section; communication will be face-to-face to reduce misunderstandings and closely coordinate delivery of servicesB. Primary and Secondary Communication Tools 1. Face-to-face communication methods 2. Cache of radios for distribution to emergency management partners 3. Amateur radio (ARES) provide a valuable communication link and can be utilized when other services are spotty or unavailableC. IT support 1. Provided as requestedIX. References ft ra 1. Minnesota Disaster Recovery Framework 2. Volunteer Management Annex 3. Donations Management Annex 4. Damage Assessment Annex D ESF 6 Mass Care, Housing, & Human Services - 7 September 14, 2011
    • Emergency Support Function - 7 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Resource and Logistical SupportI. ResponsibilitiesPRIMARY AGENCIES: Emergency Management (Disaster Resource Coordination) Finance and Information Services (Purchasing)SUPPORT AGENCIES: All City Departments, as requestedII. Overview A. Purpose ft The purpose of this Emergency Support Function (ESF) is to provide logistical and resource support during and immediately following an incident. This ESF provides for the effective utilization, prioritization and conservation of resources within the City of Rochester. ra B. Scope 1. Emergency Operations Center resource support involves the provision of services, personnel, commodities, and facilities to the City during the response and recovery phases D of an incident including, but not limited to: a. Emergency relief supplies b. Office equipment c. Office supplies d. Contracting services e. Incident Facilities f. Transportation services g. Personnel required for the support of emergency activities 2. The Finance/Purchasing Department will manage the identification of outside resources, both through the government and through private sectors. 3. It may become necessary to reallocate how City personnel, equipment, vehicles, materials, and facilities are utilized. ESF 7 Resource Support - 1 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanIII. Policies 1. In general, assure that operation response and recovery activities are properly coordinated. Resources are to be procured within the parameters established by the Emergency Management Director or designee under the emergency powers provided by Adminstrative Code 14A and Minnesota Emergency Management Act. 2. It is the policy of the City of Rochester that departments utilize their own resources and those through mutual aid agreements before requesting outside resources. 3. To the maximum extent possible, the continued operation of a free market economy using existing distribution systems will be utilized. 4. Mandatory controls on the allocation, utilization or conservation of resources may be used, if necessary, for the continued protection of public health, safety, and welfare. 5. Whenever possible, voluntary controls are preferred. The public will be encouraged to cooperate with emergency resource management measures imposed by the City. 6. Departments should use their personnel to the maximum extent possible in coordination with the Emergency Operations Center (EOC), these personnel include those not assigned emergency responsibilities. City employees may be required to work overtime when ft responding to a disaster and shall be compensated in accordance with existing rules and agreements. raIV. Situation A. Incident conditions and hazards 1. In an incident, the City of Rochester is responsible for the management of available local D resources necessary for public health and safety. 2. A significant incident may severely damage and/or limit access to resource infrastructure. 3. See Olmsted County’s All Hazard Mitigation Plan and Hazard Vulnerability Assessment (HIVA) for a description of potential emergency conditions and vulnerable populations. B. Planning assumptions 1. No guarantee of a perfect response system is expressed or implied by this ESF. The City of Rochester will make every reasonable effort to respond based on the situation, information, and resources available at the time of the incident. 2. Available resources may become limited due to high demand in a large-scale incident. 3. All departments are required to support this ESF as necessary. 4. Following an incident, there may be a need to provide resources, goods, and services to affected areas. ESF 7 Resource Support - 2 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 5. The management and logistics of resource support is highly situational and is dependent upon the incident, resource accessibility, transportation systems available, and location of vendors and suppliers. 6. All responding resources will be utilized under the Incident Command System (ICS). 7. Fundamental resources such as water, food, first aid, shelter, sanitation supplies, fuels, and tools may be needed. The City of Rochester does not have sufficient supplies and equipment on hand for long-term use. 8. Disaster recovery may be limited by the inability of the general citizenry to be self-sufficient for more than three days without additional supplies of food, water, medical and shelter resources. There may be shortages of critical drugs and medicines at medical facilities due to limited storage capacities. 9. Communication systems may be severely interrupted during an incident. 10. Transportation to affected areas may be cut off due to damaged roads, bridges, and other transportation means.V. Concept of Operations A. General Operations 1. ft City departments will first utilize procedures for their day-to-day or mutual aid resources ra before requesting outside assistance. The Finance Department may assist departments by providing guidance and funding for emergency resource procurement. 2. The City will commit all resources necessary to protect lives and property and to relieve suffering and hardship. D B. Procedures 1. All resource requests are received and processed through the City EOC when activated. 2. Resource requests are to use SALT a. Size – describe the type needed b. Amount – list the amount needed c. Location – specify where the resource is needed d. Time – give a sense of urgency by describing when the resource is expected 3. Resource requests are evaluated by the EOC and assigned a DisasterLAN ticket number. It is then assigned to be completed based on priority. 4. Management of any resource may involve the following processes: a. Evaluation of the supply and the need for a particular resource b. Determining the current and long-term needs of available resources c. Taking actions necessary to channel resources for use in essential activities d. Ensuring the most effective use of existing and potential supplies of the resource while considering the future supply ESF 7 Resource Support - 3 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan e. Evaluating and amending policies, programs, and measures to meet new emergency needs and conditions 5. It is the responsibility of the Finance and Information Services/Purchasing Department to track the status of resource requests through to completion. 6. Existing appropriate, department procedures for purchasing during an incident will be followed.C. Prevention and mitigation activities 1. Provide assistance in the purchasing of insurance specific to potential liability issues. 2. Submit disaster related financial information to higher authority as appropriate. 3. Coordinate with other departments to identify resource shortfalls to include identifying the source, price, and a delivery timeline for the resource.D. Preparedness activities 1. Procure and allocate essential resources (personnel and material) to support emergency 2. operations. ft Manage disaster procurement and contracting for the City. Develop a process and agreements for disaster procurement. ra 3. Provide a budget for supplies for incident related spending. 4. Participate in training, drills, and exercises in support of this ESF. 5. Develop, process, and sign agreements related to facility usage.E. Response D 1. Coordinate the allocation, utilization, and/or conservation of resources. 2. Provide computer, telecommunications, and communication support to City Departments and the EOC. 3. Provide emergency funds for necessary incident expenditures. 4. Coordinate incident related purchases and expenditures through support for goods and services as well as through documentation in order to qualify for State and federal reimbursement. 5. Assess the impacts of the incident on available resources. Identify repairs, maintenance and replenishment needs in coordination with all departments.F. Recovery 1. Coordinate the restocking and replenishing of resources and supplies. 2. Ensure inventory lists of all departmentally controlled assets and resource are revised. ESF 7 Resource Support - 4 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 3. Provide documentation and claims information to Director of Emergency Preparedness and the City’s insurance carriers following an incident. 4. Create After-Action Reports and Lessons Learned Reports.VI. Responsibilities A. Primary agency 1. Emergency Management a. DisasterLAN: Enter resources in system for access during disaster operations b. Training: Provide training to EOC staff for resource support through use of DLAN tickets 2. Finance a. Purchasing: Procure goods and materials to maintain disaster operations b. Agreements: Enter into agreements to allow for flow of disaster support goods B. Support agencies 1. ft Assist the EOC as need to fill resource requests raVII. Logistics A. Resource requirements 1. Resources required by this ESF are established in coordination with City departments and D support agencies. 2. Resources are first taken from current City stock, followed by commercial vendors and mutual aid. B. Logistical support 1. Disaster resource support is coordinated by the EOC. 2. DisasterLAN lists resources in the Pre-Planning menu http://eocdlan.rochestermn.gov/PrePlanning/ListResources.aspx 3. DisasterLAN Reference Library folders contain additional resources http://eocdlan.rochestermn.gov/ResourcesModule/Browser.aspx?folder=3 ESF 7 Resource Support - 5 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanVIII. Communications A. Key Agencies and Groups 1. Communication between the incident scene, LEC Dispatch, and the EOC will determine the need for resources, who will fill the request, and how it will be distributed B. Primary and Secondary Communication Tools 1. DisasterLAN is primary tool to receive and manage resource requests. a. DisasterLAN tickets are primary method for resource requests 2. ARMER radio provides a secondary means of communication 3. Tertiary systems includes ARES, if needed C. IT support 1. If information technology is needed to complete operations to support DisasterLAN serverIX. References ft ra 1. Olmsted County All Hazard Mitigation Plan and Hazard Vulnerability Assessment (HIVA). 2. Refer to primary and supporting departments’ plans for further information supporting this ESF. 3. Mutual Aid Agreements and Memorandum of Understandings (MOU) and Memorandum of Agreements (MOA) http://eocdlan.rochestermn.gov/ResourcesModule/Browser.aspx?folder=1560 D ESF 7 Resource Support - 6 September 14, 2011
    • Emergency Support Function - 8 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Public Health and Medical ServicesI. ResponsibilitiesPRIMARY AGENCIES: Fire DepartmentSUPPORT AGENCIES: Public Works RPU - Water Maintenance Gold Cross / Mayo Clinic Medical Transport Olmsted County Medical Examiner Olmsted County Public Health ft SE Region Healthcare (Minnesota Department of Health) raII. OverviewA. PurposeThis Emergency Support Function (ESF) provides the City of Rochester coordinated assistance in Dresponse to public health and medical care needs. It provides a structure to coordinate emergencymedical services/mass medical activities to ensure the safety of life and property.B. Scope 1. ESF 8 provides assistance in identifying and meeting the health and medical needs of those affected by an incident. The primary support agencies are responsible for coordinating the medical needs of City as well as responding to those with incident related injuries. Support for these responsibilities can be categorized in the following functional areas: • Assessment of health and medical needs • Medical care personnel • Health and medical equipment and supplies • Patient evacuation • Worker health and safety ESF 8 Public Health & Medical Services - 1 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan • Public health information • Potable water, wastewater, and solid waste disposal 2. Mass casualties, fatalities, and public health emergencies can either occur during the disaster or following one. The Fire Department will direct and coordinate the provisions of health and medical assistance in coordination with support organizations and agencies relating to mass casualties and fatalities. This ESF discusses overall public health response and recovery, triage, treatment, and the transportation and evacuation of those affected by the incident. Public health functions include protecting the safety of water supplies, assuring adequate sanitation is maintained, assuring the safety of food supplies, providing mortuary services and preventing or controlling epidemics. This ESF outlines the procedures for providing health services.III. Policies 1. The City of Rochester’s coordinated health and medical assistance will be directed jointly by the Fire Department through the City Emergency Operations Center (EOC). 2. The City will activate mutual aid agreements with local jurisdictions when their resources are be requested, if necessary. ft depleted or otherwise committed. Additional Olmsted County, State and federal assistance will 3. Relevant Laws (as listed in Minnesota Emergency Operations Plan) ra Public Health emergency-related legal authorities include (but not limited to): • M.S. 9.061 (additional powers; emergencies) • M.S. 12 o 12.21 (Governor) o 12.23 (facilities, utilization) o 12.31 (national security or peacetime emergency; declaration) D o 12.311 (declaration due to public health emergency) o 12.312 (termination of declaration; public health emergency) o 12.32 (Governor’s orders and rules, effect) o 12.34 (persons required to assist) o 12.36 (Governor may contract) o 12.381 (safe disposition of dead human bodies) o 12.39 (testing and treatments) • M.S. 144 (Commissioner of Health General Authority) o 144.05 (general duties of commissioner; reports) o 144.054 (subpoena power) o 144.0742 (contracts for provision of public health services) o 144.12 (regulation, enforcement, licenses, fees) o 144.14 (quarantine of interstate carriers) o 144.344 (emergency treatment) o 144.345 (representations to persons rendering service) o 144.4172 (definitions) o 144.4182 (temporary emergency hold) o 144.4183 (emergency hold hearing) o 144.419 (isolation and quarantine of persons) • 144.4195 (due process for isolation or quarantine of persons) ESF 8 Public Health & Medical Services - 2 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan • M.S. 144E (Ambulance Services) o 144E.10 (ambulance licensure) o 144E.101 (ambulance regulations) o 144E.103 (ambulance equipment) o 144E.275 (medical response unit registration) • M.S. 145A (Authorities of Local Boards of Health) o 145A.04 (Powers and duties of board of health) o 145A.06 (Commissioner; powers and duties relative to boards of health) • M.S. 148 (Prescribing and Dispensing Drugs) o 148.235 (prescribing drugs and therapeutic devices (nurses)) o 148.271 (exemptions (re: nursing licenses)) o 148.283 (unauthorized practice of professional, advanced practice registered, and practical nursing) • M.S. 151 (Pharmacies) o 151.15 (compounding drugs unlawful under certain conditions) o 151.26 (exceptions) o 151.34 (prohibited acts) o 151.37 (legend drugs, who may prescribe, possess) • Minnesota Rules o Parts 4605.7000-7500 (communicable diseases) o Parts 4690 (ambulance services)IV. Situation ft o Part 6800.3400; 6800.3750; 6800.7530 (pharmacies/prescriptions) raA. Incident conditions and hazardsSee the Olmsted County’s Hazards Identification and Vulnerability Assessment (HIVA) for a descriptionof potential emergency conditions and the All Hazards Mitigation Plan (AHMP) for an analysis of Dvulnerable populations.B. Planning assumptions 1. No guarantee of a perfect response system is expressed or implied by this ESF. The City of Rochester will make every reasonable effort to respond based on the situation, information, and resources available at the time of the incident. 2. Available resources may become limited due to high demand in a large-scale incident. 3. All departments are required to support this ESF as necessary. 4. Additional medical capabilities will urgently be needed to supplement and assist the Fire Department to triage, treat, and transport casualties. 5. Depending on the nature of the incident, health complications may include general health and mental problems, traumatic injury, communicable disease, and lack of adequate supplies of food and water due to contamination or spoiled supplies. ESF 8 Public Health & Medical Services - 3 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 6. Sewer lines and other sanitation-related infrastructure are susceptible to impact that may result in toxic environmental and public health conditions, thus threatening the surviving population and response personnel. 7. An incident may give rise to secondary sources of infection and disease if proper precautionary steps are not taken in time. 8. Residents or patients at health care facilities may require evacuation due to damage or the threat of damage from an incident. 9. The damage and destruction caused by an incident may produce urgent needs for mental health crisis counseling for victims and emergency responders. 10. The City may require assistance in maintaining a continuity of health and medical services. 11. Disruption of sanitation services and facilities, loss of power, and massing of people in shelters may increase the potential for disease and injury.V. Concept of OperationsA. General Operations ft 1. Agencies work collaboratively to prevent and prepare for disaster related services 2. Response activities are coordinated using Unified Command Structure – usually supported initially by Rochester Fire Department incident commanders ra 3. City Emergency Operations Center support incident response through prevention, preparedness, and recovery mission – response operations coordinated by City EOC for incidents within City of RochesterB. Procedures D 1. Work with agency liaison’s to develop Incident Action Plan (IAP) for operational periodC. Prevention and mitigation activities 1. The City EOC will coordinate assistance from local, State, or federal governments. 2. Reviews the County’s All Hazards Mitigation Plan as a department and discusses implementation strategies. 3. Provide ongoing medical service training to their personnel. 4. Provide general preparedness training to City employees and the public through periodic classes. 5. Establish transport procedures and capabilities to facilitate disaster operations. 6. Work with local and regional health care providers to establish alternate care facilities, fatality management, and crisis intervention services within the City of Rochester. ESF 8 Public Health & Medical Services - 4 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanD. Preparedness activities 1. Develop procedures for the accomplishment of response and recovery activities. 2. Work with support departments to develop Standard Operating Guidelines (SOGs) for recovery activities. 3. Identify and plan for special medical needs to include, equipment, personnel, and space necessary to provide care to these individuals. 4. Conduct and participate in drills, training, and exercises to validate response and recovery Standard Operating Guidelines (SOGs). 5. Revise this ESF based on drills, exercises, and real event findings. 6. Identify and inventory all community health and medical resources 7. Coordinate for the utilization of essential public health personnel, supplies and equipment to provide health and environmental sanitation services. These services may include vector control measures and communicable disease surveillance. 8. Coordinate with Olmsted County Public Health Medical Reserve Corps and volunteer medical personnel, including physicians, nurses and dentists who may be available to augment existing medical staff.E. Response ft ra 1. Provide basic and advanced life support to ill or injured persons. 2. Set-up and staff field aid stations as needed 3. Coordinate the transport of ill or injured persons. 4. Request additional medical services dependent upon the number of injuries. 5. Request critical incident stress teams. D 6. Support the medical response team and assist in determining specific health and medical needs and priorities, including request of resources through MnTRAC to support hospital resource requests 7. Assist in assessing community health and medical effects of the incident on the general population and on high-risk population groups. 8. Consult & coordinate actions with Olmsted County Public Health (OCPH) on protective actions related to direct human and animal exposure and indirect exposure through contaminated food, drugs, water supply, and other media. 9. Coordinate the provisions of water purification and waste water/solid waste disposal equipment and supplies with RPU, Public Works, and Olmsted County Public Health.F. Recovery 1. Continue response and recovery efforts in support of this ESF. 2. Create After-Action Reports and Lessons Learned Reports 3. Support recovery activities as required. ESF 8 Public Health & Medical Services - 5 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanVI. ResponsibilitiesA. Primary agency 1. Rochester Fire Department – first response emergency medical care, mass casualty incident response 2. Disaster response through City EOC - address the medical needs of the public in a manner that promotes a sanitary and safe environment while working to return the City to an adequately functioning level. 3. In coordination with other City Departments and support agencies, prepare for, support, and respond to public health issues that may effect large-scale populations.B. Support agencies 1. City of Rochester, Public Works Department – sanitary waste management 2. Rochester Public Utilities – drinking water safety 3. Gold Cross / Mayo Clinic Medical Transport – emergency medical care and transportation 4. 5. ft Olmsted County Medical Examiner – fatalities management services Olmsted County Public Health Services provides a broad range of services to prevent and respond to emerging diseases and health threats; and identifying and preventing environmental ra health risks 6. SE Region Healthcare (MDH) – prevention and planning services related to hospital services, fatality management, medical evacuation/shelter-in-place, and crisis interventionVII. Logistics DA. Resource requirements 1. Medical response personnel 2. Logistical and administrative support 3. Communication systems ESF 8 Public Health & Medical Services - 6 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanB. Logistical support 1. DisasterLAN – City of Rochester EOC management tool 2. MnTRAC – SE Regional Healthcare resource coordination toolVIII. CommunicationsA. Key Agencies and Groups 1. Incident response: Rochester Fire Department, Gold Cross / Mayo Clinic Medical Transport, Olmsted County Medical Examiner 2. Incident support and community response: City EOC, Public Works, RPU, Olmsted County Public Health, SE Region Healthcare (MDH)B. Primary and Secondary Communication Tools 1. Primary will ARMER radio talk group as assigned or requested by Incident Commander. Patch may be 2. and telephone ft needed for communication with Gold Cross response units. Primary incident support (EOC) is DisasterLAN Cellular phone service, if available. ra 3. ARES (Ham) radio operations provides the third line of communications support.C. IT support 1. DisasterLAN support (City IS Department, Buffalo Computer Graphics) 2. MnTRAC support (State of Minnesota) DIX. References 1. Olmsted County’s All Hazards Mitigation Plan (AHMP) and Hazard Inventory and Vulnerability Assessment (HIVA). 2. Refer to primary and supporting departments’ plans for further information supporting this ESF. ESF 8 Public Health & Medical Services - 7 September 14, 2011
    • Emergency Support Function - 9 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Search and RescueI. ResponsibilitiesPRIMARY AGENCY: Fire Department Rochester Police Department Olmsted County Sherriff’s Office MN Task Force One City Public Works MN State Patrol Rochester Public Utilities HSEMSUPPORT AGENCIES: National Guard Unit ft Minnesota Energy 55th Civil Support Unit Mayo Clinic City Planning and Zoning ra City Building and Safety Rochester Park and RecreationII. Overview DA. PurposeProvide for the effective utilization of Urban Search and Rescue resources and operations.B. Scope 1. Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) will be coordinated by the City of Rochester Fire Department.III. Policies 1. USAR operates in accordance with State and local jurisdiction plans. Requests for additional USAR resources, should one political subdivision be unable to provide the necessary or sufficient equipment, are coordinated through the Minnesota State Duty Officer. ESF 9 Search and Rescue - 1 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 2. The Incident Command System (ICS) is the method for on-scene incident management for USAR operations within the State. ICS shall be used for multi-agency/multi-jurisdiction USAR operations.IV. SituationA. Incident conditions and hazardsSee the Olmsted County’s All Hazards and Vulnerability Assessment (HVA) and Hazard Mitigation Plan(HMP) for a description of potential emergency conditions and vulnerable populations.B. Planning assumptions 1. No guarantee of a perfect response system is expressed or implied by this ESF. The City of Rochester will make every reasonable effort to respond based on the situation, information, and resources available at the time of the incident. 2. 3. 4. ft Available resources may become limited, including those supplied by support agencies due to high demand in a large-scale incident. All departments are required to support this ESF as necessary. Roads providing access to USAR points may be obstructed or impassable. ra 5. USAR teams are trained to handle multiple rescue types and scenarios. 6. Badly damaged buildings may require a site survey by a structural engineer prior to entry.V. Concept of Operations DA. General OperationsESF 9, Search and Rescue, manages and coordinates the response of local Urban Search and Rescue(USAR) resources in response to any incident involving search and rescue operations. These include, butare not limited to, urban water, woodlands, confined space, structural collapse, and trench rescueincidents. This ESF utilizes established emergency service and search and rescue procedures.Responsibility for situation assessment and determination of resource needs rests with local incidentcommanders.B. Procedures 1. The Rochester Fire Department is responsible for coordinating USAR resources and operations within the City. 2. Coordination with all supporting and other appropriate departments, agencies, and organizations will be performed to ensure continual operational readiness. ESF 9 Search and Rescue - 2 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 3. Applicable plans for appropriate use of personnel and equipment tasked for USAR missions will be activated upon initial coordination of rescue mission. 4. The staffing pattern and level will be dependent upon the nature and magnitude of the incident, the suddenness of onset, and the existence of USAR resources in the area.C. Prevention and mitigation activities 1. Reviews the County’s Hazard Mitigation Plan (HMP) as a department and discuss implementation strategies. 2. Review proposed USAR legislation to assure it is supportive of the State’s emergency management mission. 3. Support preventive USAR programs.D. Preparedness activities 1. Appoint a Rescue Group Leader of USAR operations. 2. Establish systems to coordinate requests for USAR resources. 3. 4. ft Support law enforcement personnel, mutual aid agencies, technical experts and volunteer organizations and individuals with USAR related training. Assist in the organization of USAR units. ra 5. Coordinate, train and maintain liaison with local and regional USAR agencies.E. Response 1. Initiate, conduct, coordinate, and direct land, air and/or water search and rescue operations within the City of Rochester. D 2. Requests for supporting agencies or support items will be done through the City EOC.F. Recovery 1. Conduct an After Action Review per SOG 205 to review the incident and capture lessons learned. 2. Create After-Action Reports and Lessons Learned Reports. 3. Provide documentation of costs incurred by the incident to the City EOC.VI. ResponsibilitiesA. Primary agency 1. Direct and conduct USAR operations. 2. Ensure staff is adequately trained to handle USAR operations. ESF 9 Search and Rescue - 3 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 3. Establish mutual aid agreements and other plans for the sharing of resources during a USAR operation.B. Support agencies 1. Rochester Police Department - Sworn officers, traffic control, crowd control 2. Olmsted County Sherriff’s Department – K9 search and rescue, dive team, Sherriff’s Posse 3. MN Task Force One – Structural collapse team (SCT) resources 4. Rochester Public Works – Heavy equipment, debris removal 5. MN State Patrol – Air support resources 6. Rochester Public Utilities – Electrical and water infrastructure, maps, support 7. MN Energy – Natural gas infrastructure, maps, shut-offs 8. National Guard – SCT support, manpower 9. 55th Civil Support Unit – Hazardous materials mitigation, communications 10. Mayo Clinic – Gold Cross Ambulance, emergency paging software support 11. Rochester City Planning and Zoning – Maps (street and GIS) 12. Rochester Building and Safety – Civil/structural engineering resources 13. ft Rochester Parks and Recreation – Downed tree management, equipmentVII. Logistics raA. Resource requirementsThe City will provide resources necessary for conducting search and rescue operations until resourcesare expended at which time a request for assistance will be sent to the County EOC via the City EOC. DB. Logistical support 1. The primary logistical support items will be obtained from City of Rochester assets. 2. As logistical support items are depleted, Mutual Aid agencies may be contacted. 3. Logistical support items may also be obtained by request through the MN State Duty Officer. 4. Private agencies and technical experts may be utilized to quickly obtain needed logistical support.VIII. CommunicationsA. Key Agencies and GroupsThe City of Rochester’s Emergency Communications Center will be responsible for primary communications. ESF 9 Search and Rescue - 4 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanB. Primary and Secondary Communication Tools 1. Primary communications will be conducted using the 800 MHz radio. The Emergency Communication Specialist will assign operation channels as outlined in ESF #2 2. Secondary devices will be depended upon if the primary system is inoperable. th 3. The 55 Civil Support Team can provide communications assistance during a natural/manmade disaster. 4. Tertiary systems should be listed, if known. If unknown, assume emergency management will provide ARES (Ham) radio operations as the third line of communications support. 5. Private agencies may be contacted to provide emergency communication equipment for situations that involve damaged communication infrastructure.C. IT supportInformation Technology Services may be needed to complete operations. Information technology includescomputers, wireless routers, air cards, printers, GIS maps, cellular telephones and emergency dispatchinghardware/software support.IX. References 1. Mutual Aid Agreements ft ra 2. National Response Framework, ESF 9 (federal) 3. Olmsted County All Hazard Mitigation Plan (HMP) and Hazard Vulnerability Assessment (HVA) D ESF 9 Search and Rescue - 5 September 14, 2011
    • Emergency Support Function - 10 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Hazardous Materials ResponseI. ResponsibilitiesPRIMARY AGENCY: Fire DepartmentSUPPORT AGENCIES: Planning and Community Development City of Rochester Emergency Management Police Department Parks and Recreation Mutual Aid AgenciesII. Overview ft raA. PurposeThe purpose of this ESF is to designate the City of Rochester’s responsibilities for managing andminimizing exposure to an emergent or potential hazardous material incident, oil spill, or otherunanticipated release or spill. DB. ScopeThis ESF is intended to provide a coordinated response to an actual or potential release of hazardousmaterials.III. PoliciesThe City of Rochester is developing an Emergency Operations Plan (EOP). The Rochester FireDepartment is developing Comprehensive Hazardous Materials Response Plans. The plans are to bedeveloped in coordination with private sector firms, volunteer groups, community awareness andemergency response planning groups, and other response organizations.State regulations require that certain employers develop emergency response plans. Planningrequirements may include coordination with outside agencies, recognition procedures, safe distances ESF 10 Hazardous Materials Response - 1 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Planand places of refuge, site security and control procedures, evacuation routes and procedures, and listsof required personal protective equipment.Exposure to hazardous material releases should be monitored and regulated in compliance withMinnesota Administrative Rules 5206.Response plans and adequate training for response to hazardous material spills should be conducted ina manner that is compliant with Minnesota Administrative Rules 5206 Hazardous Substances; EmployeeRight-to Know.The Rochester Fire Department Chemical Assessment Team follows the response protocols establishedby the Minnesota Department of Homeland Security Hazardous Materials Regional Response TeamProgram.IV. SituationA. Incident conditions and hazards 1. ft See the City of Rochester’s Hazards Identification and Vulnerability Analysis (HIVA) and Hazard Mitigation Plan (HMP) for a description of potential emergency conditions and vulnerable ra populations. 2. The volume and distribution of hazardous materials in a community determines the likelihood of an incident. Transportation routes pose a major threat because of the volume and variety of hazardous materials being transported over them. 3. The threat presented by hazardous material incidents is often to both public health and safety, D and the environment. While most hazardous material incidents involve smaller volumes of material, they do require specific approaches to different types of chemical and waste releases. It is important to assess the characteristics of the hazard, acquire the necessary resources and develop a site-specific emergency response plan. 4. Emergency response operations for hazardous material incidents may require multi-agency and multi-disciplinary responses. While upon initial assessment, some incidents may not have obvious impacts on life, property, and the environment, they may have subtle long-term consequences for human health and the environment that will require further recovery efforts.B. Planning assumptions 1. No guarantee of a perfect response system is expressed or implied by this ESF. The City of Rochester will make every reasonable effort to respond based on the situation, information, and resources available at the time of the incident. ESF 10 Hazardous Materials Response - 2 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 2. Available resources may become limited due to high demand in a large-scale incident. 3. All departments are required to support this ESF as necessary. 4. A hazardous material incident may develop slowly or occur without warning. It may also occur as the result of a secondary hazard, such as an earthquake or flood. 5. Actual or threatened releases of hazardous materials and other releases, often require immediate response. 6. Most hazardous material incidents are minor in scope and can be handled by trained local jurisdiction responders. 7. The number and severity of major incidents can be minimized by prevention programs. 8. Hazardous materials releases will be reported by facility operators using 911. 9. Facilities will have emergency response plans in accordance with MN Statute 155E and implement that plan prior to arrival by first responders (fire, police, EMS).V. Concept of OperationsA. General Operations ftThe Fire department will respond to hazardous materials incidents in accordance with State and federalregulations and agency plans. raB. Procedures 1. The Fire Department is the designated Incident Commander for incidents within the City of Rochester. 2. When an incident occurs, the Fire Department establishes a unified command system with the D police department, emergency medical services, and other local jurisdictions according mutual aid agreements. 3. Unified Command is responsible for determining the need to shelter-in-place, evacuate and/or return. The Rochester Fire Department Chemical Assessment Team will provide recommendations to Unified Command regarding these decisions based on plume modeling software and instrument monitoring for the hazardous material. 4. The responsible party has ultimate accountability for assuring effective abatement of the release or threatened release of oil or hazardous materials to include clean up costs and reimbursement. During these incidents, the Fire Department and the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency are responsible for overseeing the protection of public health and safety, and the environment. 5. If the severity of the incident is such that it is beyond the capabilities of the frontline resources of the Fire Department the Chemical Assessment Team (CAT) shall be dispatched. The CAT shall notify the State Duty Officer that they are responding to an in-jurisdiction incident. 6. If the severity of the incident is such that it is beyond the capabilities of the CAT, the Incident Commander may request additional resources from the State Duty Officer. Chemical ESF 10 Hazardous Materials Response - 3 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Assessment Teams that respond from other jurisdictions will operate according to MN Statute 299A.48-52. 7. If it is possible that the incident will have environmental implications the Incident Commander shall contact the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA). The MPCA is responsible for 24- hour environmental pollution prevention, preparedness and response within the State of Minnesota. 8. Local emergency and medical personnel will be part of the Unified Command System. Emergency and medical personnel will develop an action plan for patient decontamination, care and transport based on information provided by the Rochester Fire Department and the Chemical Assessment Team.C. Prevention and mitigation activities 1. The Rochester Fire Department Chemical Assessment Team will update the Tier II database in Cameo software as updates become available from Minnesota Homeland Security and Emergency Management Emergency Planning and Right-to-Know Act Program. This database ft will include facilities with reportable quantities of hazardous materials, facility coordinators, contact information, and amounts and locations of reportable quantities of hazardous materials. This database will include the same information for facilities that are subject to the requirements of SARA Title III, Section 302. ra 2. The Rochester Fire Department will, upon request by facility coordinators, participate in site drills and tabletop exercises. 3. The Rochester Fire Department will answer questions regarding emergency response plans and procedures posed by facility coordinators. 4. The Rochester Fire Department will suggest improvements for storage and handling of D hazardous materials when deficiencies are observed during preplan activities.D. Preparedness activities 1. The Rochester Fire Department Chemical Assessment Team will update Marplot software (as updates become available) to maintain map information used to identify locations of facilities that may contribute additional risk due to their proximity to facilities subject to the requirements of SARA Title III, Section 302 and identify locations of facilities that may be subject to additional risk due to their proximity to facilities subject to the requirements of SARA Title III, Section 302. 2. The Rochester Fire Department Chemical Assessment Team will update Cameo software (as updates become available) with Tier II information provided by Minnesota Homeland Security and Emergency Management Emergency Planning and Right-to-Know Act Program. 3. The Rochester Fire Department will train Fire Department personnel to Hazardous Materials Operations Level in accordance with Minnesota Fire Service Certification Board guidelines. Rochester Fire Department Chemical Assessment Team members will be trained to Hazardous ESF 10 Hazardous Materials Response - 4 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Materials Technician level in accordance with Minnesota Fire Service Certification Board guidelines. 4. The Rochester Fire Department will suggest improvements for Tier II site storage and handling of hazardous materials when deficiencies are observed during preplan activities. 5. The Rochester Fire Department will, upon request, review and/or exercise commercial facility emergency response plans with facility personnel. 6. The Rochester Fire Department will participate in hazardous materials exercises with community partners including, but not limited to Gold Cross Ambulance Services, Rochester Police Department, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, Olmsted County Public Health, 55th Military Civil Support Team, Mayo Clinic and other Minnesota Chemical Assessment Teams. 7. The Rochester Fire Department will participate in the Tri-State Consortium preparedness activities. 8. The Rochester Fire Department Chemical Assessment Team will maintain training and equipment lists required by the Minnesota Department of Homeland Security Hazardous Materials Regional Response Team Program.E. Response 1. ft Coordinate response to hazardous materials incidents, oil spills or releases, and identify local jurisdiction, State, and federal government responsibilities for the management of ESF 10. ra 2. Acts as incident command for oil and hazardous material spills, except where another party has already been designated. 3. Provide 24-hour response to hazardous material, oil spill, or other release incidents. 4. Coordinate fire resources for a hazardous materials incident. 5. Make emergency notifications. Determine the source and course of the incident. D 6. 7. Monitor for hazardous material to ensure public safety, the safety of first responders and other responding personnel. 8. Use Cameo, Aloha, Marplot software to determine area and population likely affected by the hazardous material release. 9. Coordinate spill response with other local, State and federal agencies, using Unified Command. 10. Establish a Joint Information Center (JIC) with involved agencies and the responsible party to provide current and accurate information to the community. 11. Identify the responsible party for a hazardous material, oil spill, or release incident. 12. Notify other appropriate agencies that may have jurisdiction in the incident. ESF 10 Hazardous Materials Response - 5 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanF. Recovery 1. Continue to coordinate decontamination and clean-up activities for all responding personnel as requested. 2. After initial activities are completed, transfer command and/or site remediation to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, or other responsible party. 3. Gather cost recovery information and submit to designated agency 4. Support community recovery activities as requested. 5. Contribute to the compiling of After-Action and Lessons Learned Reports. 6. Make necessary changes to this ESF and other supporting documents to improve future operations.VI. ResponsibilitiesA. Primary agency • • • ft Coordinate the response and recovery efforts to hazardous materials incidents. Develop hazardous materials standard operating guidelines. Update this ESF as required. raB. Support agencies • Rochester Police Department will be responsible for investigation and evidence collection if the hazardous D material release is determined to require these activities. They will also be responsible for scene security, animal control, evacuations, notifications, etc. • Gold Cross Ambulance Service will be reponsible for patient care and transport after patients have been decontaminated. • Rochester Public Works may provide heavy equipment and material for damming, diking, containment and other activities. The Waste Water Treatment Facility may need notification if hazardous material enters the sanitary sewer. • Minnesota Energy may be notified if natural gas needs to be shut down to affected buildings. • Rochester Public Utilities will be notified if electrical service needs to be shut down to affected areas, and/or if drinking water supplies are affected • Red Cross may be notified to provide for the needs of displaced or relocated victims of the incident. • Rochester City Bus Service (mass transit) may be required to transport displaced victims of the incident. ESF 10 Hazardous Materials Response - 6 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanVII. LogisticsA. Resource requirements 1. Specialized equipment and supplies are often necessary to effectively respond to hazardous materials incidents. Equipment and supplies should be appropriate to the anticipated needs and application.B. Logistical support 1. The State Duty Officer may be contacted for additional resources located outside the jurisdiction of the City of Rochester including but not limited to: a. additional Chemical Assessment Teams, th b. 55 Civil Support Team, c. Minnesota Department of Health, d. Federal Bureau of Investigation, e. Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, ft f. Department of Natural Resources, g. Department of Transportation, h. Minnesota Pollution Control Agency i. Minnesota State Patrol ra j. Bomb Squad k. Clean-up ContractorsC. Training 1. Safe, effective, and coordinated response to a hazardous materials incident requires spill D knowledge and training ranging from basic awareness to highly technical skills. 2. Local jurisdictions, State, federal and agencies are responsible for providing training appropriate to the hazardous materials incident response and incident management missions.VIII. CommunicationsA. Key Agencies and Groups • Regional Chemical Assessment Teams th • 55 Civil Support Team, • Minnesota Department of Health, • Federal Bureau of Investigation, • Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, • Department of Natural Resources, • Department of Transportation, • Minnesota Pollution Control Agency ESF 10 Hazardous Materials Response - 7 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan • Minnesota State Patrol • Bomb Squad • Clean-up ContractorsB. Primary and Secondary Communication ToolsPrimary will often be a radio, such as 800 MHz. Unified Command will make frequency assignments and talkgroups as necessary based on the communications plan.Secondary devices will be depended upon if the primary system is inoperable. These devices may include VHFradios, two-way radios, cell phones or other direct communication equipment.Emergency management will provide ARES (Ham) radio operations as the third line of communications support.C. IT supportPrimary information technology is provided on response vehicle. Assistance may be needed for IT failure to ftcomputers, wireless routers, air cards, printers, GIS maps, and the like.IX. References ra • City of Rochester’s Hazard Inventory and Vulnerability Analysis (HIVA) and Hazard Mitigation Plan (HMP) • Rochester Fire Department Chemical Assessment Teams protocols • Refer to primary and supporting departments’ plans for further information supporting this ESF. D • Common Transportation Routes Map (attached) ESF 10 Hazardous Materials Response - 8 September 14, 2011
    • Emergency Support Function - 11 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Agriculture and Natural ResourcesI. ResponsibilitiesPRIMARY AGENCY: Police DepartmentSUPPORT AGENCIES: Emergency Management Division (Fire) Public Works Department Minnesota Department of Agriculture Minnesota Department of Natural Resources ft Minnesota Board of Animal Health Olmsted County Public Health ra USDA/VS Area Veterinarian in Charge (AVIC)II. Overview DA. PurposeThis ESF ensures that animal, veterinary, and wildlife issues in a local or widespread incident aresupported.B. Scope 1. The Police Department is the primary agency for this ESF and provides enforcement support to state authorities, and animal control – both locally and supporting Department of Natural Resources wildlife issues. 2. Protection of natural resources covers supporting actions requested by State of Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) 3. Animal welfare and sheltering, and animal response related to local ordinances 4. Supporting an integrated local, State, and federal response to an outbreak of a highly contagious or economically devastating animal/zoonotic disease, as requested by Bureau of Animal Health (BAH) and Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA). ESF 11 Agricullture & Natural Resources - 1 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanIII. Policies 1. Rochester Code of Ordinances, Chapter 106A. Animals 2. Rochester Code of Ordinances, Chapter 113. Pigeons 3. Rochester Code of Ordinances, Chapter 113A. Chickens 4. Coordinate with the State Veterinarian and USDA/VS Area Veterinarian-in-Charge and /or MDA/BAH Incident Management Team who serves as the focal point for coordinating the disease management decision making process for the federal government “Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service” (APHIS). 5. In contrast to the initial local emergency response to a fire, flood, or tornado, a Foreign Animal Disease (FAD) response requires an initial rapid and coordinated state level response. Other than the responsibility to minimize the impact on its citizens from an FAD event, no authority to command or manage an FAD response including quarantine of livestock or poultry premises, depopulation of affected or potentially-affected premises and indemnification for taken animals or products exists at the local/county level.IV. SituationA. Incident conditions and hazards ft ra 1. See the Olmsted County’s Hazards and Vulnerability Analysis (HVA) and All Hazard Mitigation Plan (AHMP) for a description of potential emergency conditions and vulnerable populations. 2. A highly contagious outbreak or economically devastating zoonotic (animal) disease, or devastating plant pest infestation may occur at either the national or local levels. D 3. Residential pigeon and chicken coops may hold infectious animals 4. Animal control areas may hold infectious animals 5. Wildlife may pose a threat due to infectious diseaseB. Planning assumptions 1. No guarantee of a perfect response system is expressed or implied by this ESF. The City of Rochester will make every reasonable effort to respond based on the situation, information, and resources available at the time of the incident. 2. Available resources may become limited due to high demand in a large-scale incident. 3. All departments are required to support this ESF as necessary. 4. The following conditions may exist within the incident area: a. Some Foreign Animal Diseases are routinely handled by Bureau of Animal Health and US Department of Agriculture, and do not require local emergency response ESF 11 Agricullture & Natural Resources - 2 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan b. Widespread animal infectious disease response may overwhelm routine response by State and Federal agencies, and local resources may be requested to assist with control measures 5. A contagious animal disease and/or plant pest infestation requires animal control and the disposition of dead animals, and/or a pest control function that includes the safe disposition of infected plants. 6. The incident may cause the City to coordinate with the Minnesota Department of Agriculture and Minnesota Board of Animal Health, and/or Minnesota Department of Natural Resources for guidance and help in the response and recovery phases. 7. Guidance and regular written updates will be provided by Minnesota Department of Agriculture and Minnesota Board of Animal Health, and/or Minnesota Department of Natural Resources 8. Affected citizens that own large and/or small animals may require additional assistance in the care of their animals. 9. No animals will be held within the City of Rochester (related to transportation of large animals, and holding & confinement of animals due to emergency orders) 10. Disposal of carcasses will be in acceptable landfillsV. Concept of Operations ft raA. General Operations 1. Rochester Police Department will respond to Agriculture and Natural Resource incidents per department standard operating guidelines, and/or special operating guidelines as agreed to with responsible State of Minnesota agencies DB. Procedures 1. For animal and plant disease and pest response, the Police Department assumes primary responsibility, and coordinates with county and State agencies. 2. This ESF will coordinate through the EOC with State, county, local, and tribal responders to an outbreak of a highly contagious or economically devastating animal/zoonotic (i.e., transmitted between animals and people) disease.C. Prevention and mitigation activities 1. Maintain awareness of incidents in other areas and region that may affect the City of Rochester and surrounding areas ESF 11 Agricullture & Natural Resources - 3 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanD. Preparedness activities a. Attend training and planning seminars designed to provide information relative to animal/zoonotic disease response b. Develop plans, procedures, and other implementation instructions for items covered in this ESF c. Participate in exercisesE. Response 1. Police Animal and plant disease and pest response a. b. Coordinate with Minnesota Department of Agriculture and Minnesota Board of Animal Health, and/or Minnesota Department of Natural Resources integrated response to an outbreak of an economically devastating or highly contagious animal/zoonotic disease. c. Coordinate veterinary and wildlife services in the City’s affected areas. 2. Emergency Management ft a. Activate EOC Command group to consider local declaration of emergency to provide resource support, and enforce movement control orders ra 3. General State of Minnesota Response a. Pre-diagnosis: Provide services to identify suspicious animals using veterinarians who are foreign animal disease diagnosticians (FADD), and consultation with EOC Command, City Administration, and Mayor (a.k.a. “trusted agents”) b. Post-diagnosis: Request local declaration of disaster; Provide BAH/MDA Incident Management Teams to assist in Foreign Animal Disease (FAD) resource response and D recovery actions. c. Assist City of Rochester in emergency compliance with relevant federal and State environmental laws during response activities, such as emergency permits/consultation for natural resources use or consumption. d. Manage, monitor, assist, and conduct response and recovery actions to minimize damage to City-wide FAD incidents.F. Recovery 1. All primary agencies are responsible for creating After-Actions Reports and Lessons Learned Reports. 2. Support State of Minnesota recovery operations 3. State of Minnesota recovery activities a. Follow US Department of Agriculture guidance b. Utilize Minnesota Disaster Recovery Framework ESF 11 Agricullture & Natural Resources - 4 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanVI. ResponsibilitiesA. Primary agency 1. Police a. Animal and plant disease and pest response. b. Primary department to assist in the outbreak of an animal and/or zoonotic disease.B. Support agencies 1. Federal and/or State of Minnesota departments and agencies: Organize and coordinate the capabilities and resources of the relevant state and federal agencies to facilitate the delivery of services, technical assistance, expertise, and other support for the protection, conservation, rehabilitation, recovery, in prevention of, preparedness for, response to, and recovery from an incident. 2. Public Works: Assist in transportation of depopulated animals, including safe transportation ft routes, GIS support, and transport vehicles as requested 3. Emergency Management: Activate EOC as needed for Declaration of Local Emergency; assist in resource coordination ra 4. Olmsted County Public Health: Participate with requirements of local ordinances, such as witnessing requests for residential bird coops DVII. LogisticsA. Resource requirements 1. Bureau of Animal Health/Minnesota Department of Agriculture (BAH/MDA) Incident Management Team (IMT) 2. State Veterinarian 3. District Veterinarian 4. Federal Area Veterinarian in Charge (AVIC), if different from above resources 5. Propane and other supplies to support depopulation response 6. Disposal locations (usually county response item)B. Logistical support 1. State of Minnesota will provide logistical support of widespread incidents ESF 11 Agricullture & Natural Resources - 5 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 2. City of Rochester will provide logistical support through Police Department or Emergency Operations Center(EOC), as requestedVIII. CommunicationsA. Key Agencies and Groups 1. Police and federal, state, and county authorities will communicate through meetings, conference calls, or email correspondenceB. Primary and Secondary Communication Tools 1. Coordination of Police and State resources will be accomplished through ARMER radio system utilizing patched talk groups 2. Cache of ARMER radios will be distributed, if needed to aid communications of on-site incident management ft 3. Assume emergency management will provide ARES (Ham) radio operations as the third line of communications support. raC. IT support 1. GIS support for location of animals, transportation routes and the likeIX. References D 1. Minnesota County Foreign Animal Disease Response Support Planning Guide(September 2009) 2. Minnesota Foreign Animal Disease Response Flow Chart 3. Minnesota FAD Response Plan (version 12-10) 4. Foreign Animal Disease Emergency Planning Session 2011-2012 (SES, Inc.) 5. Olmsted County’s Hazards Identification and Vulnerability Analysis (HIVA) and All Hazard Mitigation Plan (AHMP) 6. ESF 1 Transportation ESF 11 Agricullture & Natural Resources - 6 September 14, 2011
    • Emergency Support Function - 12 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan EnergyI. Responsibilities Rochester Public Utilities – ElectricPRIMARY AGENCY: Minnesota Energy Resources Corp. – Natural Gas Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO)SUPPORT AGENCIES: Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency Minnesota Municipal Utilities Association Rochester Park and Recreation Rochester Public Works ft Greenway Coop raII. OverviewA. PurposeThe primary and support organizations of ESF 12 coordinate with energy and related private and Dgovernmental organizations to provide information for assessment, response, and recovery operationsrelated to natural gas supply, power outages, and capacity shortages that may impact Rochester citizensduring an event.B. Scope 1. Depending on the magnitude and extent of the incident, the following may occur: 2. Communication and coordination between the City and RPU to assess energy system damage, energy supply, and energy demand. 3. Determination with businesses that provide/offer such products of fuel needed for emergency operations. 4. Relaying of information and guidance on energy conservation. ESF 12 Energy - 1 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanIII. PoliciesRochester Public Utilities will establish liaison with public or private utility providers and reliabilityagencies to coordinate disaster and emergency needs and services.IV. SituationA. Incident conditions and hazards 1. See the Olmsted Countys Hazard and Vulnerability Analysis (HVA) and All Hazards Mitigation Plan (AHMP) for a description of potential emergency conditions and vulnerable populations. 2. The sudden onset of an incident may sever key energy transmission, generation, or distribution systems, thereby constraining supply in affected areas and potentially adjacent areas as well, particularly those with supply links to the directly affected areas.B. Planning assumptions 1. ft No guarantee of a perfect response system is expressed or implied by this ESF. The City of Rochester will make every reasonable effort to respond based on the situation, information, and ra resources available at the time of the incident. 2. Available resources may become limited due to high-demand in a large-scale incident. 3. All departments are required to support this ESF as necessary. 4. The occurrence of a large-scale incident may destroy or damage portions of the State’s energy and utility systems and disrupt petroleum and natural gas supplies. D 5. Widespread and possibly prolonged electric power failures may occur in a large-scale incident. 6. The transportation, media, and telecommunications infrastructures may be affected. 7. Delays in the production, refining, and delivery of petroleum-based products may occur as a result of transportation infrastructure problems and loss of commercial electrical power. 8. The supply of potable water may be affected as a result of large scale power outages.V. Concept of OperationsA. General Operations 1. Response to energy shortages or disruptions and their effects is necessary for the preservation of the public health, safety, and general welfare of our City’s citizens. Activities during an energy emergency include: • Assessing electric power damage. • Assessing energy supply and demand. ESF 12 Energy - 2 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan • Coordinating with electric utilities, reliability organizations, and the Midwest Independent System Operator to identify requirements to repair energy systems. • Coordinating closely with federal, State, and local jurisdiction officials to establish priorities to repair damaged energy systems. • Coordinating temporary, alternate, or interim sources of emergency fuel and power; obtaining current information regarding damage to energy supply and distribution systems. • Assessing the requirements for restoration. • Providing information to the public.B. Procedures 1. Rochester Public Utilities will provide services through their normal means, during an incident, to the maximum extent possible. 2. In regional outages caused by loss of transmission restoration is coordinated thru MISO. 3. 4. ft Rochester Public Utilities will furnish information to emergency government officials at all levels to inform the public on the proper use of services. Rochester Public Utilities will compile damage assessment reports and transmit them to the City ra EOC, as needed or requested. The City Emergency Operations Center (EOC) collects, evaluates, and reports on current conditions relative to staffing, equipment, and supplies to the appropriate emergency agencies. 5. Contact with Rochester Public Utilities is established by the City EOC to coordinate resources, establish priorities, assess and document damages and provide information to the public. The City EOC initiates information programs to keep the public informed of utility status and any D restrictions, as needed or when requested.C. Prevention and mitigation activities 1. Collect information on transmission infrastructure. 2. Maintain and monitor trees and other vegetation near transmission lines. 3. Maintain an emergency or back-up fuel supply. 4. Promote water conservation strategies.D. Preparedness activities 1. Prepare and update contingency plans for implementation in the event of energy shortages or emergencies and maintain liaison with the Citgy EOC regarding these plans. 2. Collect and analyze energy data and report to the City EOC on probable, imminent, and existing energy shortages. ESF 12 Energy - 3 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 3. Conduct joint preparedness drills with regional utilities based on the applicable reliability standards. 4. Maintain lists of public and private utilities, Contractors, mutual aid associations, petroleum distribution and storage and companies, including names, addresses, and telephone numbers of key officials. 5. Develop and maintain an inventory of energy, utility, and petroleum contacts and resources, noting availability and response criteria.E. Response 1. Provide liaison with the City EOC. 2. Inform the Emergency Management Director and the City EOC when conditions exist that may warrant the proclamation of a citywide emergency or energy supply alert. 3. Compile damage assessment estimates. 4. Coordinate mutual aid requests for additional resources. 5. Provide information to the City EOC regarding: 6. ft a. Status of gas station, and supply adequacy b. Location, extent, and restoration status of electricity supply outages or disruptions Coordinate communications related to energy availability and distribution issues during an ra energy incident. 7. Recommend priorities among users should the utility supply be unavailable to meet all essential needs. 8. Coordinate public information concerning energy, utilities, and water emergencies with the City EOC, Public Information Officer (PIO). DF. Recovery 1. Compile damage and operational capability information. 2. Administer energy allocation and curtailment programs in accordance with the applicable reliability standands. 3. Coordinate supporting resources for utility restoration and repair to meet essential needs. 4. Coordinate supporting resources for petroleum companies and distributors for restoration and repair to meet essential needs. 5. Create After-Action reports and Lessons Learned reports and submit them to the City’s emergency management office for review. ESF 12 Energy - 4 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanVI. ResponsibilitiesA. Primary agency 1. Provide information and resources during response to an energy emergency based on the nature, severity, and extent of the incident 2. Assess availability of energy resources (electricity) and the demand for that resource. 3. Work closely with other energy and utility companies to coordinate and implement response and to assess impact and damage.B. Support agencies 1. Provide liason to the City of Rochester for disaster coordination. 2. Provide resources for clearing roads of debris for restoration access. 3. Use of the Public Works facility for fueling vehicles.VII. LogisticsA. Resource requirements ft ra 1. Inventory lists of private and public organizations that have power generating ability. 2. Inventory lists of fuel storage areas by type, location, and capacity. 3. Necessary personnel and equipment to restore power to affected areas in a timely manner.B. Logistical support D 1. Rochester Public Utilities purchasing department for goods and services necessary for restoration. 2. Minnesota Municipal Utilities Association for mutual aid coordination.VIII. CommunicationsA. Key Agencies and Groups 1. Communications with the Midwest Independent System Operator and SMMPA are required during a regional power outage.B. Primary and Secondary Communication Tools 1. Primary will often be a radio, such as 800 MHz. List the channels available for emergency operations. 2. Communication with the MISO will be phone line as primary with SMMPA satellite phone as secondary. 3. Secondary devices will be depended upon if the primary system is inoperable. (Cell phones) ESF 12 Energy - 5 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 4. Emergency management will provide ARES (Ham) radio operations as the third line of communications support.C. IT support 1. Rochester Public Utilities system operations center uses a computer based outage management system, GIS based mapping system, and a supervisory and control system. These systems need to be supported by the RPU ITsection during an event. 2. RPU’s generating stations use computer based control systems and also need RPU IT support during an event. 3. An internet connection is needed at the EOC.IX. References 1. Minnesota Municipal Utilities Association Mutual Aid Agreement 2. Water Vunerability Assessment 4. RPU System Restoration Plan ft 3. RPU Emergency Transmission and Generation Document ra D ESF 12 Energy - 6 September 14, 2011
    • Emergency Support Function - 13 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Public Safety, Law Enforcement, and SecurityI. ResponsibilitiesPRIMARY AGENCY: Police DepartmentSUPPORT AGENCIES: Fire Department Mutual Aid AgenciesII. OverviewA. Purpose ft Emergency Support Function 13 is meant to coordinate the use of law enforcement personnel and equipment in a large-scale incident. raB. Scope 1. Effective law enforcement is essential during large-scale incidents to insure the protection of lives and property. The Rochester Police Department is responsible for the enforcement of laws, traffic control, investigation of crimes and other public safety activities within the City. D Rochester has the capability and resources to meet routine law enforcement needs however, during a large-scale incident problems may be multiplied, more complex, and could rapidly tax the capability and resources of the City.III. Policies 1. City of Rochester law enforcement response will be in accordance with the operational procedures of the City of Rochester Police Department, and this Emergency Operations Plan (EOP). 2. Law enforcement operations within the City are within the limits of the Chief of Police’s resources and authority. In the event additional law enforcement resources are required, they will be requested through the Rochester EOC When active. Otherwise follow codicle 3 below. 3. Coordination between the Rochester Police Department and other law enforcement agencies is facilitated by Minnesota State Statute, Chapter 12 “Mutual Aid, Arrangements”. The Police ESF 13 Public Safety & Law Enforcement - 1 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Department will, within the limits of their resources and authority, coordinate and support essential law enforcement operations. 4. City of Rochester policy dictates that Police Department personnel sent to assist other jurisdictions will maintain their own supervision and chain of command. Mission assignments will be accepted through a supervisor who will coordinate with the command structure of the requesting agency. It is anticipated that other jurisdictions personnel that respond to requests for assistance from the City of Rochester will operate the same way.IV. SituationA. Incident conditions and hazards 1. Any large-scale incident, natural or man-made, holds potential for causing disruption and the need for control and coordination by law enforcement to ensure the safety and security of our citizens. 2. See the City of Rochester’s Hazards Identification and Vulnerability Analysis (HIVA) and Olmsted and vulnerable populations.B. Planning assumptions ft County All Hazard Mitigation Plan (HMP) for a description of potential emergency conditions ra 1. No guarantee of a perfect response system is expressed or implied by this ESF. The City of Rochester will make every reasonable effort to respond based on the situation, information, and resources available at the time of the incident. 2. Available resources may become limited due to high demand in a large-scale incident. D 3. All departments are required to support this ESF as necessary. 4. The Police Department maintains a 24-hour operational capability. 5. Normal response may be hampered by such occurrences as bridge failures, landslides, fallen debris, flooding or fire. Police response times may be delayed and response to incidents may need to be prioritized. 6. Landline communications may be interrupted. Cellular and radio communication will be relied upon heavily, if available. Congested frequencies should be expected. 7. City personnel will provide assistance and resources as available, during an incident. 8. Per request, assistance and resources may be provided by the state, as available, during an incident. 9. The Minnesota State Patrol maintains jurisdiction for traffic enforcement and control on all State and interstate roadways within the county. ESF 13 Public Safety & Law Enforcement - 2 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanV. Concept of OperationsA. General Operations 1. In an incident, law enforcement agencies perform a wide range of functions. These include, but are not limited to, warning and evacuation, search and rescue, emergency medical services, communications, access control, and enforcement of emergency traffic regulations. 2. The Minnesota State Patrol will coordinate statewide emergency or disaster law enforcement activities.B. ProceduresWhen the scope of an event requires going beyond normal field operations, the Police Department willrespond in the following manner: 1. A Commander or designee of the Police Department will report to the City EOC, if activated, to coordinate law enforcement activities with other response functions. 2. 3. management of police operations. ft Command and support staff shall report to the EOC to provide overall policy development and Status of the Police Department personnel and vehicles, communications capabilities and ra facilities and general incident status updates are collected and relayed to the Command Staff and the Police representative in the EOC by whatever means may be available. 4. Policy level coordination is accomplished by the EOC Command Team with advice and consent of Mayor and/or City Council (and the help of the Legal Department). The designated Police Shift Supervisor is responsible for establishing liaison with the EOC to provide coordination of law enforcement activities with other response functions. D 5. If it is apparent that a large-scale incident has occurred and normal communication channels are disrupted, off-duty personnel are instructed to make contact with their supervisor for instructions. If they cannot make contact, they are instructed to report to the Law Enforcement Center or, area designated by a superior officer, to offer assistance and receive instructions.C. Prevention and mitigation activities 1. Provide personnel with the appropriate expertise to participate in activities designed to reduce or minimize the impact of future incidents. 2. Participate in a hazard identification process and identify and correct vulnerabilities in public safety and security. ESF 13 Public Safety & Law Enforcement - 3 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanD. Preparedness activities 1. The Police Department has established procedures to recall off-duty officers to duty should an incident occur. Mutual aid procedures are in place if assistance is needed from other jurisdictions. 2. Develop and maintain emergency standard operating procedures for the effective use of the Police Departments resources. 3. Maintain an Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) to assist in Department operations. 4. Assist the City of Rochester Office of Emergency Management (OEM) in the coordination of emergency management plans. 5. Provide and participate in emergency management training, drills and exercises in support of this ESF.E. Response 1. Upon the occurrence of a large-scale incident, field units will assess their own condition and situation and make an assessment of their immediate area. The Rochester/Olmsted 2. 3. ft Communications Center will roll-call field units for this information. Provide law enforcement operations within the City of Rochester. Provide direction and control for search and rescue activities not addressed in ESF 9 Search and ra Rescue. a. Missing persons (RPD command) 4. A designee of the Department will report to the City EOC, if activated, to coordinate law enforcement activities with other response functions. 5. Provide security to City facilities, as requested. D 6. Coordinate law enforcement and emergency traffic control throughout the City. 7. Provide communication resources in support of emergency operational needs. 8. Provide assistance to the Public Information Officer, if requested. 9. Coordinate evacuation of portions of population when necessary.F. Recovery 1. Participate in recovery efforts as they relate to law enforcement and the overall recovery efforts of the City. 2. Maintain liaison with the EOC. 3. Conduct reviews of incident actions with departments involved to improve future operations. 4. Maintain adequate resources to support local operations and plan for a reduction of sources. 5. Create After-Action Reports and Lessons Learned Reports ESF 13 Public Safety & Law Enforcement - 4 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanVI. ResponsibilitiesA. Primary agency 1. Responsible for law enforcement activities within the City as outlined under Department SOP’s and the Concept of Operations in this ESF. 2. Keep and preserve the public peace and safety. The functions of the department include plans to coordinate resources for public safety and welfare in the event of a large-scale incident. These tasks include, but are not limited to: • Law enforcement • Emergency evacuations • Search and rescue (i.e. missing persons.)activities for missing persons and the like • Enforcement of emergency orders designated by the EOC Command Team • Emergency traffic control • Security and perimeter control at incident scenes, shelters/staging areas in the City, and the EOC when needed • Providing resources for warning and emergency information.B. Support agencies ft ra 1. Fire Department will provide search and rescue of persons in hazardous atmospheresVII. LogisticsA. Resource requirements D 1. The primary and internal support agencies will provide their own internal supports, i.e. vehicles, travel, etc. to their staff. 2. External support agencies will provide enforcement and commissioned officers, vehicles, and traffic control equipment, as requested.B. Logistical support 1. As requested through Rochester/Olmsted Communications CenterDuring declared disasters, additional logistical support provided through Emergency Operations Center ESF 13 Public Safety & Law Enforcement - 5 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanVIII. CommunicationsA. Key Agencies and Groups 1. Rochester Fire Department via tactical frequencies as assigned per communications plan (see ESF 2 Communications)B. Primary and Secondary Communication Tools 1. Primary will often be a radio, such as 800 MHz Tactical frequencies may be allocated for communications during large emergency/disaster operations. 2. Secondary devices will be depended upon if the primary system is inoperable. 3. Tertiary systems should be listed, if known. If unknown, assume emergency management will provide ARES (Ham) radio operations as the third line of communications support.C. IT support 1. In event of primary system failure, IT support may be required to maintain emergency functions in the field.IX. References ft ra 1. City of Rochester Hazard Identification and Vulnerability Assessment (HIVA) and All HazardsMitigation Plan (HMP) 2. Refer to primary and supporting departments’ plans for further information supporting this ESF. 3. ESF 2 Communications D 4. ESF 9 Search and Rescue ESF 13 Public Safety & Law Enforcement - 6 September 14, 2011
    • Emergency Support Function - 14 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan Long-Term Community RecoveryI. ResponsibilitiesPRIMARY AGENCY: City AdminstrationSUPPORT AGENCIES: Finance Department Human Resources Department Finance (Information Services) Minnesota Homeland Security and Emergency Management Olmsted County Community Services ft Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD) raII. Overview A. Purpose The purpose of this Emergency Support Function (ESF) is to establish uniform policies for effective coordination D in accomplishing recovery and restoration tasks resulting from a significant event. The goals of recovery efforts are to restore City capabilities while also making it more resilient. B. Scope Recovery and restoration actions begin upon initiation of response actions and will be determined by the specific event. Several local, State, and federal jurisdictions may be involved depending on the hazard and scope of the situation. The City of Rochester is responsible for leading its own recovery efforts.III. Policies A. Large Scale Incidents 1. For most incidents, recovery activities will begin in the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) as staff work to assemble data on the extent of damages. If warranted, the Director for the state EMD may ESF 14 Long Term Recovery - 1 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan recommend that the Governor seek federal disaster assistance, which may include a Presidential Disaster Declaration. B. Events Requiring Hazard Control 1. Incidents involving radiological materials or chemical munitions will require special attention of the natural environment in the recovery and restoration phases.IV. Situation A. Incident conditions and hazards 1. The recovery efforts of the City of Rochester will be dependent upon the nature and magnitude of the disaster, damage of the area, the population affected and the resources available. 2. See the Olmsted Countys Hazard and Vulnerability Analysis (HVA) and All Hazards Mitigation Plan (AHMP) for a description of potential emergency conditions and vulnerable populations. B. Planning assumptions 1. ft No guarantee of a perfect response system is expressed or implied by this ESF. The City of Rochester will make every reasonable effort to respond based on the situation, information, and resources ra available at the time of the incident. 2. Available resources may become limited due to high demand in a large-scale incident. 3. All departments are required to support this ESF as necessary. 4. If a large-scale incident occurs in the City of Rochester, those affected will require assistance and support in recovering from incident related damage and destruction. DV. Concept of Operations A. General Operations 1. The City of Rochester Administration Office is the lead internal agency for all internal and external coordination efforts of this ESF. 2. Finance and Information Services/Purchasing is the primary agency responsible for coordinating the reimbursement process for the City of Rochester following an incident that qualifies for State or federal reimbursement, such as a Presidential declared disaster. 3. Individual departments/divisions are responsible for providing the appropriate documentation to the Finance Department for the reimbursement process. 4. Departments/divisions that have a role in recovery activities will provide information to the Emergency Management Division consistent with this ESF. 5. Restoration and Recovery procedures should identify priority recovery actions and the departments and/or agencies responsible for them. ESF 14 Long Term Recovery - 2 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 6. The economic and environmental impacts of recovery actions for the affected people, property, businesses, and industries in Rochester will be determined.B. Procedures 1. Recovery and restoration operations begin in the City EOC. They are based on Situation Reports developed by City department representatives in the EOC. 2. Upon activation of the EOC, a recovery plan should be formulated that includes: a. Priority of efforts b. Phasing/milestones c. Support requirements. d. Coordination requirements 3. The following recovery action items may need to be addressed, dependent on the severity of the incident: a. Protection of life, property and the environment b. Damage assessments for public and private sectors c. Restoration of City services d. Securing food, water, clothing, shelter, fuels and transportation for incident affected persons ft e. Documentation for insurance or potential State or federal reimbursement f. Appropriation of funds for recovery g. Emergency resolutions or ordinances h. Coordination of assistance from outside agencies ra i. Debris clearance j. Repair or construction of City facilitiesC. Prevention and mitigation activities 1. General Prevention Considerations D Review and analyze Lessons Learned reports from previous occurrences of incidents that have occurred elsewhere, and make appropriate corrections/additions to the respective Emergency Operations Plan, Standard Operating Guidelines (SOGs) and this ESF. 2. Before the next disaster: Hazard mitigation a. Conduct a macro risk assessment employed in COG/COOP planning process • See ESF 10 Hazardous Materials – hazardous facilities impact b. Employ managerial mitigation • Insure the assets • Hire for extreme event experience and prepare the staff • Put hold harmless provisions in place • Develop mutual assistance agreements and have contracts in place with reliable vendors • Communicate the risks to the public and train the public on what to do c. Plan now for what to do in the immediate aftermath of the disaster • Process planning ESF 14 Long Term Recovery - 3 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan • Planning for generally predictable events with generally predictable consequences d. What should be done before the next event • Plan: Not just for emergencies; build disaster planning in budget systems • Diversify: Economic vitality from many sources • Network: Together we prepare • Standardize: Common vs. proprietary • Position your community: NFIP community • Partner: Within and outside the area • Start today: Community resiliency begins with usD. Preparedness activities 1. Provide emergency management training, drills and exercises in support of this ESF. 2. Utilize standardized forms to assist in the reimbursement process for the City. 3. Work toward community resiliency a. The built environment: Strengthen existing structures b. Social and economic resiliency c. Reduce exposure if it makes sense ft d. Reduce vulnerability of the built environment e. Build redundancy as a safety net f. Spread your risks ra g. Prepare for rapid replacementE. Response 1. General Response Considerations D a. Act as liaison to county, State and federal representatives including, but not limited to, disaster survey teams and disaster and claims assistance representatives. b. Prepare and provide situation reports; periodically provide them to State of Minnesota Homeland Security and Emergency Management Division. c. Coordinate restoration of essential functions of the City.Restoring government services and repairing public facilities and infrastructure is an essential function of government d. Coordinate public information and services by agencies that provide short-term assistance to individuals and families 2. Local government operating systems must be operational a. Fortifying accounting and finance systems b. Reduce nonessential bureaucracy c. Ensure adequate staffing d. Learn about assistance programs e. Create a high-level problem-solving team ESF 14 Long Term Recovery - 4 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 3. Identifying what has to be done next a. Assessing the nature and extent of the consequences • Most obvious • Moving beyond immediate consequences b. Shaping the post-event trajectory c. Restoring high-priority structures and services d. Closing the long-term revenue gap e. Helping with healing 4. Helping residents resume routine activities a. Essential goods and services b. Housing c. Building permits d. Damage assessment e. Money for local government and private organizationsF. Recovery 1. General Recovery Concepts ft ra a. Support the recovery and restoration of City services. b. Cooperate and Coordinate with local businesses, the Chamber of Commerce, local NGOs, OlmstedCounty, and the State to carry out recovery assistance efforts. c. Provide public information in regards to recovery requirements. d. Conduct a post-incident review to evaluate the Emergency Coordination Center procedures. e. Review City department produced Lessons Learned and After Actions Reports. D f. Allow for unanticipated or uncontrollable events g. Avoid assuming everyone has the same recovery goals • Resist the urge to make swift and/or permanent changes • Set a reasonable course of action that can change when fresh options emerge h. Process of recovery • Community assessment • Community visioning • Goal setting • Determining the basic strategy • Post-disaster community planning i. Rebuilding or restoring the economy • Jobs are needed for workers • Housing is needed to support jobs • Working to revitalize local businesses j. Local government cannot go it alone; we are all in this together k. Employ a strategy from getting from here to there. Consider both: • Municipal recovery – first priority ESF 14 Long Term Recovery - 5 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan • Community recovery – long term partnership with recovery agencies 2. (Seven) Basic strategies for rebuilding the local economy 1) Do what we already know how to do 2) Re-create what used to be 3) Take a great leap forward 4) Transform yourself 5) Work with the market 6) Build on what you have 7) Dont do much other than restore infrastructureVI. Responsibilities A. Primary agency 1. Support the recovery and restoration of City services. 2. 3. 4. 5. ft Provide public information in regards to recovery requirements. Conduct a post-incident review to evaluate the Emergency Coordination Center procedures. Review City department produced Lessons Learned and After Actions Reports. Cooperate and Coordinate with local businesses, the Chamber of Commerce, local NGOs, King County, ra and the State to carry out recovery assistance efforts. B. Support agencies 1. Work with City of Rochester to coordinate long-term recovery activities DVII. Logistics A. Resource requirements 1. The resources necessary to accomplish the recovery and restoration tasks will be determined by the situation and established by the State of Minnesota recovery framework B. Logistical support 1. City of Rochester EOC provides initial logistical support for recovery activites 2. Transition to other agencies may be necessary to support long-term recovery ESF 14 Long Term Recovery - 6 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanVIII. Communications A. Key Agencies and Groups 1. Goal of communications: Timely, Accurate, Coordinated, Accessible 2. Two-way communication • Meeting centers • Social media • Town hall discussions B. Primary and Secondary Communication Tools 1. Choice of delivery systems • Dependent upon stability of electronic communications infrastructure • Consider face-to-face communications with community groups and citizens • One-way communications via web page as an electronic bulletin board should be considered • Other methods as determined by Public Information Officers, or through planning discussions C. IT support 1. ft IT support needed to robust communications – consider staff dedicated solely to supporting recovery ra functionIX. References A. See Donations Management Annex D B. Refer to primary and supporting departments’ plans for further information supporting this ESF. ESF 14 Long Term Recovery - 7 September 14, 2011
    • Emergency Support Function - 15 City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan External AffairsI. ResponsibilitiesPRIMARY AGENCY: Emergency ManagementSUPPORT AGENCIES: Fire Department Police Department Information Services Division (Finance) Library ft Public Safety Communications Center (Police) Olmsted County HSEM ra Olmsted County Telecommunications Mayo Clinic Emergency Communications Center DII. Overview A. Purpose The purpose ESF 15 External Affairs is to provide timely, accurate, coordinated, and accessible information and instruction for the public, media, government agencies, and community response partners. B. Scope 1. Early disaster intervention can lessen the effects of hazards in many situations. Emergency public information actions before, during, and following any emergency provides a means to implement protective measures. 2. Pr ovide early and updated information to Community Notification Partners 3. Provide citizen alert and notification via early hazard warning systems (e.g. sirens) and mass notification systems (e.g. Rochester-Alert) ESF 15 External Affairs - 1 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 4. Provide public information management in complex emergencies and disasterts at the Emergency Operations Center (EOC), in order to coordinate the delivery of disaster response messages, and control rumors through reliable and authoritative informationIII. Policies • City of Rochester has a duty to provide alerts and warnings to the general public • Community Emergency Notification Procedure - addresses how information is shared with response partners • City of Rochester Code of Ordinances 3956, Chapter 14A – addresses coordination of response before, during, and after a complex emergency or disaster • Siren Memorandum of Understanding between City of Rochester and Olmsted County – addresses the delegation of outdoor warnings in severe weather situations • Rochester-Alert Standard Operating Guidelines – apply to pre-disaster and disaster related messaging • ft Duirng EOC activation, the City of Rochester’s public information response will be in accordance with the operational procedures and policies of the City and this Emergency Operations Plan (EOP). All public information releases will be approved by the Incident ra Commander or EOC Command. • Standard Operating Guidelines (or Procedures) during Disaster Declaration – in situations where department policies and emergency operation action plans are in conflict, emergency operations instructions shall supercede department procedures. This applies only during Mayor’s Declaration of Disaster. DIV. Situation A. Incident conditions and hazards 1. Hazard Awareness - see the Olmsted Countys Hazard Identification and Vulnerability Analysis (HIVA) and All Hazards Mitigation Plan (AHMP) for a description of potential emergency conditions and vulnerable populations. 2. The City may periodically experience situations that require the dissemination of critical information to the public. The means of dissemination include the news media (radio, television, cable, print) and the Internet. 3. When the need for communications equipment is the highest, there may be fewer resources, thus requiring a need for reprioritization and reallocation of working systems. 4. Communications resources may be overwhelmed, requiring outside assets and assistance. ESF 15 External Affairs - 2 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan B. Planning assumptions 1. No guarantee of a perfect response system is expressed or implied by this ESF. The City of Rochester will make every reasonable effort to respond based on the situation, information, and resources available at the time of the incident. 2. Available resources may become limited due to high demand in a large-scale incident. 3. All departments are required to support this ESF as necessary. 4. A combination of warnings, including the Emergency Alert System (EAS) may be utilized. The EAS warning method is used in cooperation with the Olmsted County Office of Emergency Management, local broadcasters and cable providers. 5. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) is available to give a rapid, initial warning to the public. It may be used in time-sensitive, life threatening situations when the public must be warned immediately of an impending incident.. 6. Normal means of communication may not be available. In those situations, nontraditional means of communicating with the public must be established and utilized, for example, posting notices, utilizing public address systems, etc. Communications Office staff. ft 7. Demand for information regarding the disaster may exceed the capabilities of the 8. In the aftermath of an incident, information is often vague, difficult to confirm, and ra contradictory. 9. Public Information Officers (PIOs) must focus on stopping rumors and providing accurate and timely information using all dissemination methods. 10. Depending on the nature and magnitude of the incident, different levels of public information may be required (public information may in fact be the primary function occurring during an emergency). D 11. In the aftermath of an incident, there will be a great demand to know what volunteer/aid resources are needed and what are available.V. Concept of Operations A. General Operations 1. It is important to maintain situational awareness of hazards that can threaten the health and safety of citizens, or cause abnormal stress to community partners. The Community Emergency Notification procedure provides early situational awareness and is used to provide information to identified community partners. 2. Emergency management acts to discern to potential severity of the threat and give updates to community partners ESF 15 External Affairs - 3 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan3. In an incident, the ability to communicate externally to the public is critical. Rochester-Alert provides a number to gateways to send messages to private notification groups and the general public4. The City of Rochester government will prepare and distribute emergency preparedness information to the public before, during, and after an incident of local or regional significance, using all available media. Public information will be disseminated in phases, in accordance with the size and scope of the emergency or disaster.5. Initially, the public information function will be covered by the response agency responsible for the scene (e.g., police, fire, water, etc.). Because of the nature of the incident(s), a PIO team may need to be dispatched to handle media at the scene of an incident in support of the Incident Commander.6. In large-scale incidents, the PIO function will be conducted from a Joint Information Center (JIC) that may include other non-City jurisdictions.7. The purpose of the JIC is not to control the activities of other jurisdictions, but to provide a process for the sharing of information between jurisdictions and a central point for the media to get information.B. Procedures ft ra1. Follow Community Emergency Notification procedures to provide early and ongoing information sharing to the emergency response community2. Use Rochester-Alert for citizens alerts and notifications3. Use DisasterLAN for EOC information sharing4. During EOC activations, Public Information Officers take over responsibility for Rochester-Alert notifications, including regular information updates, and conduct press briefings in accordance D with PIO operational proceduresC. Prevention and mitigation activities1. Support establishment of a Joint Information Center (JIC), an area for public information coordination activities with internal and external agencies.2. Arrange for public notifications to be announced in multiple languages.D. Preparedness activities1. Organize and coordinate the emergency public information program for the City, to include the preparation and maintenance of a Joint Information Center (JIC) Manual.2. Conduct training for City department personnel whose normal duties may not include Public Information Officer (PIO) functions.3. Establish and coordinate procedures, and determine the designated facilities for use by the City Public Information Officer (PIO) Team during an incident. ESF 15 External Affairs - 4 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan4. Establish procedures for alerting their Communications Office personnel and other key employees in an Incident of local or regional significance.5. Update equipment and resource listings on an annual or more frequent basis and distribute them appropriately.6. Regularly attend scheduled exercises and all other applicable training events.7. Review and analyze lessons learned from incidents that have occurred in other jurisdictions, and make appropriate correction/additions to respective SOGs and this ESF.E. Response1. Establish and maintain contact with the Incident Commander or EOC Director.2. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) provides emergency information to the public via local radio and television stations. It may be activated by contacting the Olmsted County Sheriff’s Department, Washington State Emergency Management Division, NOAA, or NORCOM.3. Set up the JIC upon request of the Incident Commander or EOC Director.4. Coordinate the dissemination of all disaster information to the news media via news releases, ft news conferences, and media telephone inquiries.5. Provide information directly to the public via the news media, and the Internet using City of Rochester and other joint regional public information sites (e.g., the Rochester web site). ra6. In a complex emergency or disaster, the Public Information Officer’s (PIO) function will be operated on a 24-hour basis for a potentially sustained period of time. Trained PIOs from the City, possibly augmented by other trained personnel, may work in a consolidated Joint Information Center (JIC).7. The Public Information Officer (PIO), or designee, will open the Joint Information Center to coordinate public information communications and other information activities with public and D private agencies.8. The Public Information Officers (PIOs) will keep the public informed of what to do to prevent injury or property damage, and what actions the City government is taking. All public information releases must be approved by the Incident Commander or EOC Director.9. Notification of citizens regarding emergency information and instructions may be handled at the incident scene through the Emergency Alert System (EAS), door-to-door by uniformed City or other personnel, mobile public address systems, AM1650 or any other means available.10. Clearly document all related costs, actions, and communications.F. Recovery1. Consult with ESF 5, Emergency Management, and ESF 14, Long-term Community Recovery, regarding needed recovery strategy.2. Continue the public information program providing information and instructions about City, County, State and Federal government emergency operations; future plans for restoration of ESF 15 External Affairs - 5 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan disaster affected areas; and instructions on how to apply for federal disaster assistance programs administered by the State. 3. Create After-Action and Lessons Learned Reports and submit them to the Office of Emergency Management.VI. Responsibilities A. Primary agency 1. The City of Rochester Emergency Management Division is responsible for coordinating this Emergency Support Function (ESF) in an incident of local or regional significance. As such, their duties/responsibilities include: a. Pre-incident planning and coordination. b. Managing the financial aspects of this ESF’s response, including the funding of mission assignments and/or reimbursable agreements. ft c. Maintain ongoing contact with ESF primary and support agencies. d. Provide trained Public Information Officers (PIO) staff that can independently set up and operate the Joint Information Center (JIC). ra B. Support agencies 1. Fire Department – provide public information officers; provide Rochester-Alert administration 2. Police Department – provide public information officers; provide Rochester-Alert administration 3. Information Services – support IT infrastructure, such as DLAN server, MS Outlook distribution D groups, City web site; support videoconferening capabilitiy and support 4. Library – provide public information officers with expertise in social media 5. Public Safety Communications Center (Police LEC Dispatch) – provide emergency alerts and notifications 6. Olmsted County Homeland Security and Emergency Management – activate sirens for City of Rochester per siren activation policy 7. Olmsted County Telecommunications (Telcom) – provide Avaya telephone support; provide conference call and webinar capability through State of Minnesota 8. Mayo Clinic Emergency Communications Center – provide link to Mayo Clinic emergency operations 9. Other Community Notification Partners – assign point-of-contact for receiving emergency notification and updated notifications; may include conference call discussions for initial emergency actions ESF 15 External Affairs - 6 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanVII. Logistics A. Resource requirements 1. The City will provide space, telephones, and limited administrative support at the JIC 2. The support agencies will provide representatives, on a 24-hour basis, to the city JIC location 3. Cable TV Rochester, cable channel RCTV 21, available through Charter 4. Conference call capability through State of Minnesota (see Olmsted County Telcom) 5. Videoconferencing capability B. Logistical support 1. Conference call coordination provided by City of Rochester Emergency Management Division 2. EOC will provide coordination of press briefingsVIII. Communications A. Key Agencies and Groups ft ra 1. Community Emergency Notification Partners – notification through Rochester-Alert, conference calls 2. Media (Press) - email and FAX distribution groups, press briefings 3. Citizens (general public) – sirens, Rochester-Alert gateways, social media D B. Primary and Secondary Communication Tools 1. Rochester-Alert private notification groups will be primary means to alert Community Emergency Notification Partners 2. Email and FAX distribution groups will be primary means to share Public Information releases and press conference arrangements 3. Rochester-Alert press releases and notification gateways are primary means to alert and notify citizens (general public) 4. Siren activation will be primary means to alert citizens who are outside during a Severe Weather Incident (primarily, but not limited to Tornado Warnings) 5. Secondary devices will be depended upon if the primary system is inoperable and may be a variety of methods available at the time of crisis (such as public address systems) 6. Ham radio (ARES) can provide a reliable back-up support for communicating messages ESF 15 External Affairs - 7 September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan C. IT support 1. If information technology is needed to complete operations, list vital needs. Information technology includes computers (number and type), wireless routers, air cards, printers, GIS maps, and the like.IX. References • Olmsted County’s Hazard and Vulnerability Assessment (HIVA) and All-Hazard Mitigation Plan (AHMP). • ESF 2- Communication Systems • Refer to primary and supporting department plans for further information supporting this ESF. ft ra D ESF 15 External Affairs - 8 September 14, 2011
    • Continuity of Government (GOG) / Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP)COG/COOP currently under development.Scheduled for completion in 2012. ft ra D
    • Debris Management Annex City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanI. Responsibilities .......................................................................................................................................... 2II. Overview ................................................................................................................................................... 2 A. Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 2 B. Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 3III. Policies ..................................................................................................................................................... 3IV. Situation ................................................................................................................................................... 4 A. Incident conditions and hazards ........................................................................................................... 4 B. Planning assumptions ........................................................................................................................... 5V. Concept of Operations .............................................................................................................................. 5 ft A. General Operations............................................................................................................................... 5 B. Procedures ............................................................................................................................................ 6 ra C. Prevention and mitigation activities ..................................................................................................... 6 D. Preparedness activities ......................................................................................................................... 7 E. Response ............................................................................................................................................... 7 F. Recovery ................................................................................................................................................ 9 DVI. Responsibilities ...................................................................................................................................... 10 A. Primary agency ................................................................................................................................... 10 B. Support agencies................................................................................................................................. 11VII. Logistics................................................................................................................................................. 11 A. Resource requirements ...................................................................................................................... 11 B. Logistical support ................................................................................................................................ 11VIII. Communications .................................................................................................................................. 12 A. Key Agencies and Groups ................................................................................................................... 12 B. Primary and Secondary Communication Tools ................................................................................... 12 C. Communications Between Public and Response Personnel............................................................... 14IX. References ............................................................................................................................................. 15X. Appendices.............................................................................................................................................. 15 Debris Management - 1 July 31, 1999 Revised September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan A. Appendix 1: Map Showing Level 1 Streets and Holding/Disposal Sites.................................................. B. Appendix 2: Disposal Sites ...................................................................................................................... C. Appendix 3: Private Firms and Contractors ............................................................................................ D. Appendix 4: Response Team Supervisory Personnel ............................................................................. E. Appendix 5: Forestry Division Emergency Response Procedures and Contact Numbers....................... F. Appendix 6: Original Planning Team Members (Storm Response Management Plan) ..........................I. ResponsibilitiesPRIMARY AGENCY: Parks Department – Trees and vegetative debris Public Works Department – All remaining debrisSUPPORT AGENCIES: ft Fire Department Police Department ra Finance Rochester Public Utilities Law Enforcement Center Dispatch (911 PSAP) D Minnesota Pollution Control Authority (MPCA) Private ContractorsII. OverviewA. Purpose 1. The primary purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for action to be taken by City staff prior to, during and immediately after severe weather related emergencies. 2. Secondary purposes of the handbook are to provide a current listing of City personnel, related agency contacts and private sector firms that can be called on to assist in the City’s response to the emergency and to document general practices and procedures to be followed during response to a weather related emergency. Debris Management - 2 July 31, 1999 Revised September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 3. The handbook will primarily deal with the issue of responding to severe weather related tree and building debris removal and disposal.B. Scope 1. A disaster is a crisis event that transcends the normal emergency response. Disasters are different in four unique ways: 1) Coordination of many emergency responders and extra “outside” agencies; 2) Responders perform limited, specific tasks or assume non- traditional roles; 3) Different performance standards are applied; 4) Public/private interface is highly interactive and absolutely vital to a successful disaster response. 2. Each element of this definition is covered in this debris management annex: Coordination of Parks, RPU, and Public Works responders, and private contractors, will be managed by field supervisors using the incident management system. The Emergency Operations Center will activate and support the field response with logistics, planning, finance, and coordination of operations. Public Works, Parks, and RPU responders will work in roles not customary to their daily operations. Finally, ft performance standards will be different from normal debris removal to include priorities established by EOC Command & Field Supervisors (such as opening routes of travel for emergency response). raIII. Policies 1. EMERGENCY RESPONSE OVERALL PRIORITIES D  Public Safety…protect lives, clear streets, correct downed utility lines  Stabilize the Emergency...clean up debris and deal with wood waste  Conserve and Protect Property…deal with damaged trees and related hazards  Community Continuity...people and business return as feasibly possible to pre- disaster status 2. Trees from Private Property a. In general, breakage and damage occurring from trees growing on private property are the responsibility of the property owner. When a private tree has fallen into the city right-of-way and is obstructing the sidewalk or street, the City will remove that portion of the tree encroaching on the right-of-way. Brush from such right-of-way clearance may be removed from the site by the City or stacked on the private property—depending on which option permits the quickest removal of the encroachment. 3. Hauling Private Property Brush and Debris Debris Management - 3 July 31, 1999 Revised September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan a. Generally, the city does not haul private property originated tree or storm debris. Only downed trees, tree branches and uprooted trees from public property are hauled and disposed of by the city. b. In the event of a major storm, the Mayor and Common Council may declare that the city will haul all private and public storm tree and building debris. Until such declaration has been made, it shall be the policy that no private storm generated debris will be disposed of by the city. 4. Declaration That City of Rochester Will Haul All Storm Debris a. A news release should be made once the declaration to have the city haul all storm-generated debris has been made. The news release should include information on: b. What materials will be hauled: Only tree debris Building materials Damaged household goods Appliances ft c. Stacking of materials procedures d. Location of temporary disposal sites for those who wish to haul themselves ra e. Schedule for pick up by area of the CityIV. SituationA. Incident conditions and hazards D 1. Minor emergencies would include windstorms with straight-line winds measured at 70 mph or less, isolated lightning strikes or tree falls, marginal ice over conditions and localized flooding. These emergencies would be responded to and handled initially by staff that is either on duty or assigned stand-by status. a. An event should be determined to be minor if the initial assessment of damage indicates that all level one traffic routes could be open for traffic use within six hours of the event and all other traffic routes are open for traffic within 24 hours of the event. b. Hazard reduction and brush cleanup activities may extend beyond the initial 24- period but all hazardous situations should be abated within this period. 2. Major emergencies would include tornado touch down, extensive flooding conditions, and severe thunderstorms with winds in excess of 70 mph or widespread heavy ice over conditions. These emergencies would be responded to initially by on duty personnel who would assess the extent of damage and then, if necessary, contact the one or Debris Management - 4 July 31, 1999 Revised September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan several of the emergency response team supervisors. Major weather related emergencies are usually forecasted far enough in advance so that the response team supervisors are able to make preliminary response plans prior to the emergency occurring. 3. See the Olmsted Countys Hazard Identification and Vulnerability Analysis (HIVA) and All Hazards Mitigation Plan (AHMP) for a description of potential emergency conditions and vulnerable populations.B. Planning assumptions 1. It should be assumed that not every severe weather event will trigger activation of the emergency response as outline in the handbook 2. Rochester Parks and Recreations, Rochester Public Utilities (RPU), Rochester Public Works Department, and other groups will receive training to perform duties safely, and with a working knowledge of tools and equipment 3. City of Rochester Emergency Operations Center will activate to support the overall ft response, provide logistical assistance, and plan for extended operations 4. Communications systems may not be operating due to overload, damage, and the like (cellular phones, "landline" phones, or radio systems) raV. Concept of OperationsA. General Operations D 1. Severe storm debris will be removed from City streets and right of ways by Parks and Recreation (trees and vegetative) and Public Works (sand, housing material, foreign objects, and the like) per normal operations. 2. Disasters are different and require coordinated operations for a safe and effective response 3. Normally the response team supervisors would access the extent of damage, confer and jointly determine the required level of response 4. The response team supervisors would make recommendations based on field observations to the Department heads and Emergency Management Operations Center if the center has been activated. Debris Management - 5 July 31, 1999 Revised September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanB. Procedures 1. Receiving and Dispatching Calls - Storm Damage a. Calls regarding damaged trees should be initially directed to the operations base via either radio, cellular or land line telephone. Following the initial storm response and during follow up clean up operations, requests for service should be made to the Park and Recreation Department Administrative Offices. The following information should be routinely gathered and recorded: 2. Debris Response Guidelines Reported by: Priority (suggested) 1. Officer standing by hazards 2. Power line down Police or Fire Officer 3. Street totally blocked and impassable Parks, Public Works, RPU 4. Barricades needed Other city employee 5. Street ½ blocked, but passable Volunteer agency (emergency partner) Citizen ft 6. Debris on house or car 7. Sidewalk/parking lane blocked 8. Debris lying or stacked on ra boulevard 9. Debris on city property or park 3. The manner in which calls are dispatched to the field will be determined by the magnitude of the storm. In most instances, only high priority calls will be dispatched to the field supervisors via radio. Lower priority calls will be forwarded to the respective D quadrant field supervisors periodically. 4. Also, see Appendices: • Response Team Supervisory Personnel • FORESTRY DIVISION EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES / NUMBERS • Private Firms and Contractors • Disposal SitesC. Prevention and mitigation activities 1. Tree Location a. Trees and other significant vegetation are identified using GPS 2. Tree Inspection and Maintenance a. Trees on city property and along streets and right of ways are inspected annually for damage and wear Debris Management - 6 July 31, 1999 Revised September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan b. Trimming and other preventative measures are performed to reduce or eliminate hazards c. Periodic inspections are conducted after major stormsD. Preparedness activities 1. The Debris Management annex was first developed as the Rochester Parks Storm Response Management handbook (see Original Planning Team Members) (insert hyperlink) 2. This plan will be reviewed annually by primary and supporting agencies, or after a significant event, to revise and update 3. Annual training is conducted by RPU for energy hazard recognition 4. Annual training is conducted by Parks for operational proficiency in chain saws, boom trucks, and other tools & equipment used by non-traditional responders for debris removalE. Response 1. Initial Damage Assessment ft ra a. Response team personnel should be on site and have made initial assessments of damage within 60 minutes of the end of the weather event. At this time the determination of how many personnel should initially be called in to service should be made. The first personnel to report should be assigned to deal with the known level one priority. D b. Within the next two hours, response team personnel or their designees should be assigned a quadrant of the city to inspect. All level one streets should be inspected and an overall judgement of the level of damage in each of the quadrants should be made. This initial assessment will be done via visual inspection and will be aided by calls and observations of police and fire personnel as they respond to citizen calls. c. Response team members will: i. Confer and agree on which Level one streets and which quadrants of the city the available personnel / equipment should be assigned ii. Determine what personnel, equipment and outside assistance will be needed iii. Report findings to Department Heads and Emergency Operations Center 2. Initial Field Assignments Debris Management - 7 July 31, 1999 Revised September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan a. Rochester Public Utility personnel will be available to work with Public Works and Park personnel in order to open streets. RPU crews need to verify status of downed lines prior to debris being pushed via loader to open streets. The combined crews would be dispatched as per requests originated by Fire/LEC Dispatch, RPU or base operations. This initial effort is aimed at opening Level One streets. A minimum commitment to hauling debris should be made during the initial response effort. b. Depending on the extent of damages, a combined crew should be assigned to each quadrant of the City to clear Level One streets3. Priority Ranking of Storm Service Requests • Under major storm conditions, it is impossible to respond to calls on an individual basis. Therefore, only the most critical high priority calls will be serviced in this manner. Service will be given to individual calls in the following order: a. High Priority  Debris trapping injured people ft  Debris blocking Level One streets  Debris downed blocking RPU major response efforts  Debris downed blocking Level Two streets ra  Trees split with high probability of falling and causing damage to persons or property  Debris blocking exits from residences / businesses  Trees fallen and at rest on homes  Debris fallen and at rest on vehicles D b. Secondary Priority  Debris blocking sidewalks  Hauling downed debris from Level One streets  Hauling downed debris from Level Two streets  Hauling downed debris from city parks, city lands  Removal of non hazardous broken limbs, repair of damaged trees  Hauling of debris from city lands, clean up temporary brush sites c. The high priority calls will be handled by crews dispatched on an individual basis until quadrant section response is organized.4. Quadrant Section Response a. Quadrant sections are the City’s functional work unit for most tree-related operations. Under major storm conditions, the majority of calls for service will be serviced on a quadrant section basis with efforts concentrated in the most severely damaged sections. Debris Management - 8 July 31, 1999 Revised September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan b. The quadrant section efforts are generally initiated after the most critical of the high priority calls have been dispatched. High priority calls may be integrated into the quadrant clean up as crews become available. The first objective of quadrant section clearing efforts is road clearing. During the initial phases, crews should make a minimum commitment to picking up and disposing of brush. During the initial phases of the storm cleanup activities should be limited to those necessary to alleviate hazardous situations such as street blockage followed by debris hauling and correction of broken hanging and downed branches. 5. Field Supervisors a. Field supervisors will be assigned specific areas—generally a quadrant of the city. These supervisors will be the main communication between the operations base and the work crews actually responding to the storm clean up. The number of supervisors assigned will be determined by the magnitude of the damage in the city. The field supervisors will be responsible for directing personnel and ft equipment assigned to their quadrant and shall have the authority to determine priority responses within their quadrant. The supervisors will likely be assigned from the following or similar current city positions: ra • Forestry Crew Chief • Park Crew Chief • Assistant. Street Superintendent • Street Crew Chief • Park/Forestry Supervisor D • City Forester • Assistant. Park Supervisor • Operations Center 6. The base site for coordinating a major response effort will be from the Emergency Operations Center currently located in Room 320 at City Hall. 7. Communication between Park supervisory personnel, EOC / LEC Dispatchers and field crews will be coordinated at this site.F. Recovery 1. Administrative Issues a. Record Keeping: Assistant. Dir of Park and Recreation and an appointee from the City Finance Department will be responsible for assigning coding numbers for all storm related responses. Debris Management - 9 July 31, 1999 Revised September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan b.Public Service Announcements: the Emergency Operations Center shall be responsible for issuing announcements regarding the progress of the storm clean up. The initial announcement should include information on the extent of damage and an estimate for the amount of time needed to open all streets and the amount of time needed for clean up. 2. Financial Reimbursement - FEMA a. Insert language related to FEMA reimbursement b. Use experience from June tornado and September flooding to guide the process c. Include items such as staff and equipment connection for reimbursement d. Add other items useful to anyone who will be doing this for the first time, such as the spreadsheet used to gather dollar amountsVI. ResponsibilitiesA. Primary agency 1. ft Rochester Public Works: Primary responsibility for non-tree debris clearance - coordinates clearance of debris from streets, haul debris ra 2. Rochester Park Department:Aerial lift required tree work, coordinate tree debris clearance streets, downed and uprooted tree removal, damaged tree removal, temporary disposal site clean up and handling of debris a. In addition, the Forestry Supervisor shall be responsible for updating and distributing the information in the manual every two years. The update should D be completed by 1 March. b. Distribution of Manual— • Rochester Public Works, Joe Fitzpatrick • Rochester Public Works, Mike Burns • Rochester Park Department, Denny Stotz • Rochester Park Department, Steve Lawson • Rochester Park Department, Jacob Ryg • Rochester Park Department, Mike Schaber • Rochester Park Department, Charles Melby • Rochester Public Utilities, Dale Olofson • Olmsted County Public Works, Mike Sheehan • Rochester Emergency Management, Ken Jones • Rochester LEC Dispatch Center, Gary Mulleneaux c. Also, see Appendix: Original Planning Team Members Debris Management - 10 July 31, 1999 Revised September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanB. Support agencies 1. Rochester Public Utilities: Repair or remove downed lines / restore electrical service 2. Rochester Fire Department: Provide backup site for debris operation center 3. Law Enforcement Center: Dispatch center, field observation and reporting 4. Emergency Management: Monitor weather conditions, provide briefings of imminent storms, activate Emergency Operations Center to support overall response, assist with FEMA reimbursement 5. Finance Department: Coordinate financial reimbursement during recovery phase 6. Private Contractors: Assist with items as specified by field supervisionVII. LogisticsA. Resource requirements ft 1. Tools needed include: Chainsaws, other, other, other 2. Equipment needed includes: Aerial boom trucks, bobcat loaders, front-end loaders, ra 3. Transportation vehicles needed include: Public Works dump trucks, Parks and Recreation dump trucks, other 4. Fuel for vehicles: Fueling stations will be available at Rochester Public Works Maintenance Center at 1502 4th Street SE and Rochester Park and Recreation Department Maintenance Center at 403 East Center Street. Both sites have back up D generators to pump fuel. 5. Tire repair from debris damage will need to be providedB. Logistical support 1. Fuel, supplies, and replacement equipment 2. who provides what, when, where, and how 3. Items not available in current storage will be requested through LEC Dispatch or from the Emergency Operations Center (Logistics, through Operations Section), if activated Debris Management - 11 July 31, 1999 Revised September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations PlanVIII. CommunicationsA. Key Agencies and Groups 1. The initial responders to the emergency should determine which of the communication systems are available for coordinating the response. 2. Following determination of which communication systems are operational, the LEC/Fire Dispatch should be contacted and be informed of which system the responders are using to receive service requests. 3. The communication systems that may or may not be available include:B. Primary and Secondary Communication Tools 1. Primary Communications a. The radio systems should be operational in the event of wide spread power loss as the system is powered by backup generators. The EOC will serve as the base ft for 800 MHz radio operations during the initial response. Public Works, Park and Recreation and LEC should be able to communicate via the radios using the City frequency. ra b. Currently RPU does not have 800 MHz frequency access. Radio communication with RPU can be via 800 MHz radio to Rochester Public Utility operations which has the ability to monitor and respond to 800 MHz, they can then contact RPU field crews as needed. A second option for communication with RPU is via the RPU staff located at EOC. These staff will have access to 800 MHz radio and D contact RPU field crews as needed. c. A list of supervisory responders and the radio frequencies which they have access to is included in the handbook. The initial responders should attempt to make contact with each other by either radio or telephone. All responders should monitor the EOC frequency until it is determined what communication options are operational and which channels are designated for responders use. Debris Management - 12 July 31, 1999 Revised September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan City of Rochester Parks 800 MHz ZONE A INCIDENT COMMAND ZONE CCHANNEL Parks Fleet 1 Parks* Parks Parks 2 Parks 2 OLATAC 1 3 Parks 3 OL ATAC 2 4 Parks 4 OL ATAC 3 OL EOC 5 6 ft Parks Dispatcher Street Maintenance OL ATAC 4 SE ATAC 1 ROC EOC EOC TAC 1 ra 7 SE ATAC 2 EOC TAC 2 8 LE DISP SE ATAC 3 OL ROAM 9 LE ALT SE ATAC 4D 10 S TAC 1 11 S TAC 2 12 S TAC 3 13 S TAC4 14 A-SOA-1 15 A-SOA-2 16 Parks* Parks Parks Debris Management - 13 July 31, 1999 Revised September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan 2. Secondary Communications a. CELLULAR TELEPHONE b. Mobile or cellular systems may not be operational. For the purposes of this handbook, it is assumed that the cellular system is inoperational. A listing of numbers for key personnel is included in the handbook. c. LANDLINE PHONES d. This system will likely not be operational. For the purposes of this handbook, it is assumed that the system is non-operational. A listing of numbers for key personnel is included in the handbook. 3. Tertiary Communications a. HAM radio (ARES) will provide a third line of support for communicationsC. Communications Between Public and Response Personnel 1. ft If land telephone lines are operational at City Hall and Park Maintenance Center, these answering machines should inform after hour callers that emergency only requests for service are being handled at this time and that calls for service should be directed to the ra Law Enforcement Dispatch Center at 328-6800 2. The following personnel should be responsible for reprogramming the telephone messages received by the public when calling for assistance: a. Mike Schaber………………..Park Maintenance b. Jacob Ryg…..………………. Forestry Division D c. Denny Stotz ………………...Park Department 3. Administration @ City Hall a. It should be assumed that the operations base would handle calls from the public only until such time as telephone service is restored to City Hall and the Park/Forestry Maintenance Center. After the initial response and clean up operations have begun, calls for service should be directed to the Public Works Operations Center and/or the Park and Recreation Administration Offices at City Hall. Debris Management - 14 July 31, 1999 Revised September 14, 2011
    • City of Rochester Emergency Operations Plan b.IX. References 1. Plan Development References a. Milwaukee Department of Public Works, Forestry Division. Emergency Storm Response Manual. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 1996. b. City of Mankato, Forestry Division. Emergency Storm Response Manual. Mankato, Minnesota. 1998. c. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Office of Solid Waste, Planning For Disaster Debris Booklet. December 1995.X. Appendices Appendix 1: Park Storm Debris Map Appendix 2: Disposal Sites ft Appendix 3: Private Firms and Contractors ra Appendix 4: Response Team Supervisory Personnel Appendix 5: Forestry Division Emergency Response Procedures and Contact Numbers D Appendix 6: Original Planning Team Members (Storm Response Management Plan) Debris Management - 15 July 31, 1999 Revised September 14, 2011
    • Donations Management AnnexAnnex currently under development.Scheduled for completion in late 2011. ft ra D
    • Volunteer Management AnnexI. ResponsibilitiesInsert table hereII. Overview A. Purpose The purpose of the Volunteer Management Annex is to establish procedures and assign responsibilities for managing unaffiliated volunteers offered to help in the wake of a natural, technological, or terrorism-caused disasters. unsolicited donated goods and undesignated financial contributions B. Scope ft ra A united and cooperative effort by local, state and federal agencies, along with public, private and donor communities is necessary for the successful management of unsolicited donated goods, unaffiliated disaster volunteers and undesignated monetary offers during times of disaster or emergencies. This plan outlines a system for managing these offers and for applying them in an effective and efficient manner to assist those affected by disaster with their recovery efforts. DIII. PoliciesCity of Rochester is assigned the responsibility to act as the coordinating body for this annexand will rely on a partnership between government and Non-Governmental Organizations(NGO’s) to provide services necessary to perform these functions.Federal Government/National Level Voluntary OrganizationsNational Response Framework (NRF) Volunteer and Donations Management SupportAnnex. This directive specifies that Volunteer and Donations Management is a primarily localgovernment function, supported by donations and volunteer management personnel fromvoluntary agencies, the state and federal governments.Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 101, Developing and Maintaining State, Territorial,Tribal and Local Government Emergency Plans
    • HSEEP Exercise Evaluation Guide: Volunteer and Donations ManagementManaging Spontaneous Volunteers in Times of Disaster: The Synergy of Structure and GoodIntentions – Guidance from the Points of Light Foundation, Volunteer Center National Networkand National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (NVOAD), on how to manage groups ofunaffiliated volunteers.State Government/State Level Voluntary OrganizationsState of Minnesota Donations and Volunteer Management Plan (Guidance document to MNEmergency Operations Plan (MEOP) Annex N: Resource Management)MNWALK Checklist (Questions 93-97)-Addresses volunteer and donations managementrequirements for local Emergency Operations PlansMinnesota Statutes, Chapter 12, Emergency Management – Provides state-level guidance ondonations and volunteer management and on worker’s compensation coverage for properlyregistered disaster volunteers. ftMinnesota Statutes, 604A.01, Good Samaritan Law – Provides liability guidance for volunteersperforming emergency duties. raLocal Government/Community Level Voluntary OrganizationsEast Overshoe County Emergency Operations Plan, Annex R: Volunteer and DonationsManagement (This document) DAdventist Community Services memorandum of agreement and Warehousing Plan – Outlineshow Adventist Community Services (ACS) and local government will collaborate to addressunsolicited donated goods management issues.Donations/Volunteer management agreements with other voluntary agencies (ex. the SalvationArmy, American Red Cross, etc.).Memorandum of Agreement with local Community Organizations Active in Disaster (COAD)leadership (if established)Local laws regarding volunteer liability etc.
    • IV. Situation A. Incident conditions and hazards Disaster incidents may or may not create a need to coordinate unsolicited donations of goods, large numbers of unaffiliated disaster volunteers, or undesignated donations of funds to assist those affected. Jurisdictions participating in the incident will share information related to the response. Disaster intelligence regarding volunteer and donation management efforts will vary depending on the disaster and will include goods needed, goods offered, volunteer activities etc. Incident specific methods for information sharing will be determined by and coordinated through the Volunteer and Donations Branch Director and the Logistics Section as appropriate to ensure that the information reaches all necessary participants in related activities and that proper procedures are followed for the sharing of any sensitive or security intelligence. See the Olmsted Countys Hazard Identification and Vulnerability Analysis (HIVA) and All Hazards Mitigation Plan (AHMP) for a description of potential emergency conditions and vulnerable populations. B. Planning assumptions ft ra East Overshoe County uses the National Incident Management System (NIMS) when managing all disasters. Management of unsolicited donated goods/funds and the services of unaffiliated disaster volunteers is primarily a function of local government. In the event of a disaster or D emergency, local government and voluntary agencies must collaborate to manage these resources in the most effective and efficient way possible. Donated goods which are solicited by a relief organization are the responsibility of that organization. They will make their own arrangements for receiving, storing, distributing and disposing of such items. Volunteers who are affiliated with a disaster response organization will be managed by leadership from the organization they work with. The organization they are affiliated with is responsible for the management, support and overall welfare of affiliated volunteers during their assignments. Affiliated volunteers should be sent to their own organization’s on-scene leadership for assignment, guidance and support. Monetary donations specifically designated for a particular organization are the responsibility of that organization. They will receive, account for and distribute funds received according to their own agency policies.
    • The best way for the public to assist during disasters is to offer monetary donations directly to voluntary organizations that are assisting those affected by disaster. In some cases, well- meaning donors may offer funds to the government to assist disaster victims, without designating a specific agency to manage/distribute them. In these situations, a fund management/distribution system will need to be established to receive, account for and distribute these funds. Unsolicited donated goods may arrive without warning and without proper packaging. Unaffiliated disaster volunteers may arrive spontaneously in a disaster area, regardless of whether their services are or are not needed. On-scene management, training, orientation and support resources may be required to properly coordinate unaffiliated volunteer efforts. Media coverage of a disaster or emergency will increase awareness and may seriously affect the amounts of unsolicited donated goods received and the numbers of unaffiliated volunteers who offer to assist. Donations and volunteer managers must work closely with the Public Information Officer to provide accurate and timely information to the public on the best ways to donate funds, goods or to volunteer to assist.V. Concept of Operations ft ra A. General Operations Jurisdictional Coordination Local (City/County) – Communities which are affected by a disaster/emergency maintain local D jurisdictional control over donations and volunteer management issues. When county assistance is requested, or the county activates the donations/volunteer management system s on its own due to scope of the disaster situation, local and county officials and responders will coordinate their donations and volunteer management efforts. In such situations, the County Donations and Volunteer lead will serve as the coordinator for donated goods and unaffiliated volunteer management. Local voluntary organizations with donations and/or volunteer coordination resources or expertise and local Citizen Corps leadership will be incorporated into the Volunteer and Donation Coordination Branch (VDCB), to the maximum extent possible. State – Donations and volunteer management functions at the state level are primarily geared to provide support and assistance to local/county donations and volunteer managers. They would only assume direct management of local donations/volunteers in extremely rare situations where local officials were unable to do so themselves. County donations and volunteer management staff will coordinate their efforts with participating state agencies, the State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) and their voluntary agency partners. When East Overshoe County volunteer and donations management capabilities are overwhelmed, the county incident commander (or designee) may request assistance from the State of
    • Minnesota. Requests should be made through the MN EOC Operations Section Chief (if theState EOC is activated), or through the State Duty Officer at other times.Federal - Donations and volunteer management functions at the federal level are provided bythe Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in cooperation with its NationalVoluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (NVOAD) partners. FEMA assistance is providedto state and local responders in very large (federally declared) disaster and emergencysituations, when the resources of state and local responders are overwhelmed. Countyvolunteer and donations management staff will coordinate their operations with federalofficials and national voluntary agency staff that may be assisting. If needed, federalassistance will be requested by the State.B. ProceduresActivation GuidelinesThis annex may be activated by the East Overshoe County Emergency Management Director(or his/her designee), when any of the following situations occur: ftLocal voluntary agencies or public safety dispatchers indicate to the Emergency OperationsCenter (EOC), or to the Incident Commander, that they are being overwhelmed with offers of radonated goods or unaffiliated volunteers in the wake of a disaster/emergency.Media coverage of local disaster response efforts appears likely to generate an influx of offersof unsolicited donated goods, unaffiliated volunteers or undesignated monetary donations.On the recommendation of EOC Logistics or Planning Section Chiefs, or Municipal/County DIncident Commanders/Managers.The Volunteer and Donations Management Annex may be partially or fully activated,depending upon the needs of the disaster/emergency response operation. The staffing chartbelow outlines the requirements for limited and full activations.Assistance from the State Volunteer and Donations Coordinating Branch will be requestedthrough the Minnesota Duty Officer (or State EOC, when activated), when local officialsdetermine that their donations/volunteer management resources are about to be exhausted oroverwhelmedOrganizationWhen the situation warrants, a local Volunteer and Donations Coordination Branch (VDCB)will be established to coordinate the efforts of unaffiliated disaster volunteers, and manage theflow of unsolicited goods donations to the area during times of emergency. A Volunteer andDonations Coordination Branch Director will be assigned by the Emergency Operations
    • Center Logistics Chief to manage the donated goods and volunteer management operation.The following functions should be considered by the VDCB and can be organized into thefollowing groups, as the situation dictates:Unsolicited Donated Goods/Undesignated Funds Group (Small and Large ScaleOperations) – To manage the flow of unsolicited donated goods and undesignated monetarydonations to clients and to disaster relief organizations during times of disaster. The groupwill be lead by an Unsolicited Donated Goods/Undesignated Funds Group Supervisor.Unaffiliated Volunteer Group (Small andLarge Scale Operations) – To coordinate and managethe efforts of unaffiliated volunteers who offer to help in the wake of disasters or emergencies.The Unaffiliated Volunteer Group will be led by an Unaffiliated Volunteer Group Supervisor.Data Management Group (for Larger Operations) - To establish and operate datamanagement, collection and dissemination systems required to properly manage thevolunteer and donation management effort. The Data Management Group will be lead by aData Group Supervisor. ftTransportation Group (Larger Operations) – To provide means to move unaffiliated volunteersand unsolicited donated goods between volunteer/donations management facilities and otherworksites. The Transportation Group will be lead by a Transportation Group Supervisor. raC. Prevention and mitigation activitiesList activities hereD. Preparedness activities DList activities hereE. ResponseVolunteer and Donations Management Operational Guidelines – Here are general guidelines forestablishing, operating and closing volunteer and donation management functions. Note that detailedoperational procedures are contained within Standard Operations Procedures/Guides and checklists.Staffing – All personnel selected for leadership positions must have completed the DonationManagement Workshop (FEMA Course G288). All assigned personnel must take safety trainingcourses appropriate for their duties. Job Descriptions for leadership positions can be found inSection IX., Attachment B of this document.Volunteer and Donation Branch Director and Group Supervisors – The Volunteer & Donations BranchDirector should be selected from among local government/county staff. Group Supervisors may be
    • selected from government staff or voluntary agency partners with appropriate training andexperience.Unit Leaders - may be selected from government staff or voluntary agency partners with appropriatetraining and experience. In some cases, functions may be totally staffed by voluntary agencypersonnel (Adventist Community Services warehouses or Lutheran Social Service volunteer centers,for example).Unit Staff – may consist of government staff, voluntary agency partners and/or unaffiliatedvolunteers. All staff will be provided with orientations, on the job skill training and safety trainingappropriate for their duties.Facilities - Depending upon needs, the following sites may be established to support donations orvolunteer management efforts. Recommended specifications for each type of facility can be found inattachment A to this document. See the resource section for sources of possible facilities. Details onthe operation of any of these facilities can be found in their associated SOP. Facilities which maybecome necessary include: ftDonations Reception Centers- where donated goods are initially brought to be categorized, received,sorted, and processed to make them ready for distribution or warehousing. Critically-needed donatedgoods will be sent directly to distribution centers to be given to disaster clients. Items that are not raimmediately needed will be sent to warehouses for storage until they are required.Warehouses – Where goods that will be needed in the future, but are not currently needed arestored. Warehouses will not be located in or near the disaster area, and goods stored in thewarehouse will not be distributed directly to disaster clients, but will be sent, when required, to DDistribution Centers to be given out to those in need. Multi-Agency warehouses may also beestablished in some circumstances by voluntary organizations to store materials/equipment they willneed for upcoming disaster relief operations. The establishing agencies are responsible for theoperation of such facilities.Distribution Centers – located in close proximity to disaster clients (but in safe areas), distributioncenters are where clients may get needed goods. Distribution centers are stocked directly fromdonations reception centers (for critically needed supplies) and from warehouses (for other goods, asneeds dictate).Volunteer Coordination/Reception Centers – Where unaffiliated volunteers are directed to beregistered, credentialed, provided training and orientation, assigned to work parties and transportedto work sites.Offer processing/ Data management – All offers of donated goods, volunteer service or undesignatedcash will be processed by VDCB personnel within 48 hours of its receipt. Offers will be accepted,
    • rejected or referred to other agencies, as appropriate, and each potential donor will be thanked fortheir offer.Offer processing systems - Refer to the Resources Section for potential sources of hotline operationsand offer processing staff and systems.A checklist for hotline operations and offer processing can be found in attachment F4 to this plan.In the event that automated offer processing and record-keeping systems are unavailable, paperforms and manual systems will be used as a backup. See attachments C1 and C2 in the ResourceSection for sample paper donations forms and logs.Donated GoodsDonors will be encouraged to donate money to Voluntary Organizations Active in disaster (VOAD), inlieu of goods. If the donor insists on providing unsolicited goods for the disaster relief operation, theywill be encouraged to do so by donating goods through a voluntary agency in their own area. ftDonated goods offers will be screened for inappropriate items. Offers deemed inappropriate/notuseful will not be accepted. raDonors will be asked to properly pack and label accepted goods donations and to providetransportation to donation facilities whenever possible.Unaffiliated VolunteersCallers offering volunteer services will be screened by call takers. Volunteers who can perform Drequired duties will receive general instructions on how to prepare for their volunteer assignment.All unaffiliated volunteers will go to a Volunteer Reception Center to be registered, credentialed,receive necessary orientation and training, be assigned to work parties and be dispatched to workassignments. Unaffiliated volunteers will not self-deploy directly to the worksite.iii.Unaffiliated volunteers are responsible for wearing clothing appropriate to the tasks beingperformed, for bringing appropriate safety equipment and for making their own arrangements forlodging, should that become necessary. The county will make appropriate arrangements for sanitaryfacilities, specialized personal protective equipment (PPE) and will coordinate with voluntary agenciesto arrange for feeding and hydration of volunteers.
    • iv. Additional services, including Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) and first aid will be madeavailable for volunteers when required, through a collaboration of government and voluntary agencyproviders.v. Volunteers who are registered with the county and under county direction are considered officialrepresentatives of the county and will conduct themselves in an appropriate manner. They must obeyall applicable local laws, including regulations regarding trespassing and looting. Volunteers found tobe in violation of any law, county policy, or guidance in this annex may be relieved from duty.vi. Laws regarding the use of government volunteers on private property will vary depending on thejurisdiction involved. The jurisdiction may choose to have property owners register to have volunteerscome and assist them with a particular disaster recovery task at an agreed to time. Otherwise ftvolunteers may be prohibited from entering and working on private property. raUndesignated Offers of FundsEvery effort will be made to encourage persons and organizations wishing to donate money to do so Dthrough a recognized voluntary agency of their choice. Local government should avoid managingdonated funds whenever possible.Donation call-takers who receive offers directed to a specific voluntary agency will re-direct the offerto staff from the intended recipient agency.Donors who are undecided about who should receive their gift will be given a list of agenciesaccepting their type of donations and will be encouraged to select an appropriate agency from it.No attempts will be made by anyone involved in the implementation of this plan to solicit donationsfor any specific voluntary organization.
    • 4. Public MessagesPublic information messages may be released to direct offers of unsolicited goods, undesignated fundsand to manage offers of service from unaffiliated volunteers. Development and release of all publicinformation messages will be coordinated with the Public Information Officer (PIO).Messages about how to properly offer donated goods, contribute financially, or how to volunteer toassist with recovery efforts should begin as soon as possible after the onset of disaster, to lessen theoccurrence of ad-hoc efforts to assist that are well-intentioned, but poorly thought-out/implemented.Sample public messages regarding donated goods and volunteer services can be found in AttachmentE of this plan.5. Managing unsolicited donated goods and undesignated financial contributions ftDetailed instructions on managing unsolicited goods and undesignated funds can be found in theDonated Goods SOP. raDonated goods that are not needed for disaster relief may be offered to non-profit social serviceorganizations or distributed among the government public aid programs, as needed, for their use inproviding social services. Items that are spoiled, expired, damaged, or defective will be recycled orotherwise disposed of in an appropriate manner.Managing Unaffiliated Volunteers DDetailed instructions on managing unaffiliated disaster volunteers can be found in the Donated GoodsSOP.XPrivate organizations involved in the response to a disaster affecting East Overshoe County whoaccept financial contributions will do so in accordance with their own internal policies.It is recommended that any financial contributions given to the jurisdiction itself be used to set up orsupport a long term recovery fund and be administered by a Long Term Recovery (or Unmet Needs)Committee.
    • F. Recovery List activities hereVI. Responsibilities A. Primary agency List responsibilities here B. Support agencies East Overshoe County Emergency Management: Maintains the East Overshoe County emergency operations plan (EOP) and the Volunteer and this Donations Management Annex Activates this annex as necessary ft Works with Logistics Chief, assigns Volunteer and Donations Coordination Branch Director(s) as ra required to manage volunteer and donation coordination efforts. Establishes and maintains any necessary Memorandums Of Understanding (MOU) with support agencies performing the critical functions of this annex Ensures that any County Volunteer and Donations Management activities are coordinated with the D affected municipalities in the County through the ICS structure established at the time. Provides safety briefings for volunteers at Volunteer Reception Centers Arranges for traffic control around volunteer and donations management facilities Arranges for security of facilities and staff at volunteer and donations management facilities The Volunteer and Donations Coordination Branch Director: Manages the Volunteer and Donations Coordination Branch Supervises and coordinates the efforts of Unsolicited Donated Goods/Undesignated Funds, Unaffiliated Volunteer and Data Management Group Supervisors.
    • Assigns appropriate personnel to work with public, private and faith-based representatives for themanagement of unsolicited donated goods.Coordinates all public messages regarding unaffiliated volunteers, undesignated monetary donationsand unsolicited donated goods with the Public Information Officer (PIO).Provides status reports about the volunteer and donations management effort to the Logistics Chief.Performs other duties as required by the EOC Logistics Chief.Ensures that the safety of all volunteers and branch staff and that safe work practices are followed atall donations and volunteer worksites through coordination with the ICS Safety Officer.United Way “211” (or other agency responsible for taking calls from donors/volunteers)Provide “call center” services as requiredXXXX ft raAgency responsible for Unaffiliated Volunteer Management function (Lutheran Disaster Services):Provide volunteer coordination servicesAgency responsible for Unsolicited Donated Goods management (Adventist Community Services): DProvide donations coordination servicesDonated goods facility managementCoordinate with the Donations and Volunteer Management Annex Lead and available securityresources to ensure that Donations facilities are properly secured (see Donations and WarehouseSecurity resources)The Salvation Army:Can assist (as available), with the provision of hydration of unaffiliated volunteers at reception centersand/or in the fieldCan assist with the provision of feeding (from snacks to meals as available and appropriate) tounaffiliated volunteers at reception centers and/or during breaks in the field
    • Can provide psychological first aid to unaffiliated volunteers at reception centers Local American Red Cross chapter: Can assist (as available) with the provision of first aid and medical screening coordination for unaffiliated volunteers Can assist in the provision of feeding and hydration of unaffiliated volunteers at reception centers and/or in the field Can provide psychological first aid to unaffiliated volunteers at reception centers MN VOAD: Can assist in locating additional volunteer and donations management resources Can participate in local Long-Term recovery efforts ft Can assist with formation of local Long-Term Recovery (unmet needs committees)VII. Logistics ra A. Resource requirements Assistance from Voluntary Agencies D Minnesota Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (MN VOAD) Main contact number: (612) 232-3920 Assistance from State Government When the State Emergency Operations Center is activated (651) 201-7483 (Local Communicator) (651) 201-7465 or 7466 (Operations Section) At other times – Minnesota Duty Officer (800) 422-0798 (24hrs.) Assistance from Federal Government – Coordinate all Federal assistance through the State Government.
    • When the State Emergency Operations Center is activated(651) 201-7483 (Local Communicator)(651) 201-7465 or 7466 (Operations Section)At other times – Minnesota Duty Officer (800) 422-0798 (24hrs.)Facilities (examples below)MNPRO (www.mnpro.com): to find local available warehouse and other potential Volunteer andDonations facilities, operated by the Minnesota Department of Employment and EconomicSecurity (DEED)County Property Management/ServicesVoluntary organizations including MN VOAD that have access to appropriate facilities (see the MNVOAD matrix) ftLocal commercial realtors and realtors associationsLocal Chambers of Commerce raVolunteer and Donations Management Staffing/Personnel (examples below)Donated Goods Management DAdventist Community Services (ACS)The Salvation Army (SA)Other local voluntary agencies and MN VOAD members who specialize in donated goods management(see the MN VOAD matrix)Unaffiliated Volunteer Management (Examples below)Lutheran Social Services/Lutheran Disaster Response (LSS/LDR)East Overshoe County Volunteer Services/Local Volunteer Center (Hands On Minnesota)East Overshoe County Citizen Corps/East Overshoe County Community Emergency Response Teams(CERT)
    • Other local voluntary agencies and MN VOAD members who specialize in volunteer management (seethe MN VOAD matrix)Data Managers (examples below)Call takers and information distribution managementLocal United Way 2-1-1.East Overshoe County staff (as appropriate and available), to assist with data managementUndesignated Funds Managers (if unable to direct funds to individual VOAD members who willmanage them internally)East Overshoe County Budgeting and Accounting staffVolunteers from a local charitable foundation (in some cases the foundation itself may manage thefund itself)Transportation Managers ft raLocal/County Fleet Management (non emergency dispatch) personnelLocal school bus or public transit companiesSchool district bus fleet managers DSecurityLocal business owners and managers associations (advice on securing private security resources)Law enforcement officers, reserves and volunteersLaw enforcement officersPolice/Sheriff reservesVolunteers In Police Service (VIPS) volunteersCommunity Emergency Response Team (CERT) or Neighborhood Watch volunteersEquipment
    • Donated Goods Management:Material handling/storage equipment, packaging materials/equipment, andrefrigeration (if required)County contracted vendorsDonations Coordination StaffAdventist Community Services (ACS) (contact through MN VOAD, (612) 232-3920)Unaffiliated Volunteer ManagementVolunteer management supplies and equipmentOn-the-Job training and volunteer orientation and registration materials see Attachments (sectionE)Identification/credentialing system ftcounty contracts with vendors that can supply temporary wrist bands raother credentialing resources (such as ID card printers, etc.) which areavailable to your jurisdictionSanitary facilities DCounty contracts with providers of portable sanitation equipment and servicesVoluntary agencies may be able to assistFood and refreshmentSalvation Army (SA)Local American Red Cross ChapterCommercial food providers/Local restaurants/vendorsTransportation (equipment, operators etc)Unsolicited Donated goods
    • Local trucking companies and businesses with delivery trucksLocal Teamsters Union (drivers)County contracted transportation resource providersVoluntary organizations (with delivery vehicles)Unaffiliated VolunteersLocal school district/private school bus companiesOther local public bus/transportation companiesNew and used car dealershipsCar/Truck rental servicesSystems and servicesData/Record-Keeping ft raUnsolicited Donated GoodsAdventist Community Services - Has a system that they use to track donated goods infacilities they are managing DRecord-keeping system donated by local businessesLocally-purchased commercial inventory softwareManual (pen and paper) record-keeping systemUnaffiliated VolunteersPersonnel registry from agency providing coordination (local volunteer center, forexample)Commercially-bought personnel record-keeping systemManual (pen and paper) record-keeping systemDonation and Volunteer Hotlines
    • United Way 211 - Can serve as a Donations and Volunteer hotline service. Their call center can take donations and volunteer offers and can coordinate with the County on procedures, guidelines, and needs etc. Local/County owned/operated hotline services - List local or county contracted telecommunications providers who may be able to provide additional lines and equipment for hotline operations. B. Logistical support Add expected support items in the Logistical Support section.VIII. Communications A. Key Agencies and Groups NOTE: THIS SECTION IS ADDED FOR CITY OF ROCHESTER. List agencies and/or groups who are expected to assist ft in emergency response, and recovery operations. B. Primary and Secondary Communication Tools ra Primary will often be a radio, such as 800 MHz. List the channels available for emergency operations. Secondary devices will be depended upon if the primary system is inoperable. Tertiary systems should be listed, if known. If unknown, assume emergency management will provide ARES D (Ham) radio operations as the third line of communications support. C. IT support If information technology is needed to complete operations, list vital needs. Information technology includes computers (number and type), wireless routers, air cards, printers, GIS maps, and the like.IX. ReferencesChapter 12State of Minnesota Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM) plan template: Donations andVolunteer Management Annex