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Center City Housing Corp. report

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Center City Housing Corp. report: Families and Youth without Stable Housing in Rochester

Center City Housing Corp. report: Families and Youth without Stable Housing in Rochester

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  • 1. 2012Families and Youth withoutStable Housing in Rochester Center City Housing Corporation 105 ½ 1st Street, Duluth, MN
  • 2. Families and Youthwithout Stable Housing in Rochester: A Needs Assessment April 2012 Center City Housing Corporation 105 ½ 1st Street Duluth, MN 55802 http://www.centercityhousing.org/ 218-722-7161 With funding from: Corporation for Supportive Housing 2801 21st Avenue South, Suite 230 Minneapolis, MN 55407 Phone: 612-721-3700; http://www.csh.org/mn Prepared by: Patty Beech Planning Consultant 222 E. Superior Street, #324 Duluth, MN 55802 pbeech@cpinternet.com 218-525-4957 2
  • 3. Table of ContentsI. Executive Summary.......................................................................... 4II. Needs Assessment Partners, Background, and Process........8IIII. Key Informant Summary – Homeless Families…………………12IV. Numbers and Needs of Homeless and At-Risk Families.... 15V. Current Resources for Homeless Families……………………… 22VI. Numbers and Needs of Homeless Youth/Young Adults...... 26VII. Current Resources for Homeless Youth……………………………34 3
  • 4. I. Executive SummaryThis report is an assessment of need, based on data from Olmsted County agencies that providehousing and services to families and youth/young adults under the age of 25 that are homeless or atrisk of homelessness. The report was developed by Center City Housing Corporation (CCHC) in orderto determine the number of permanent supportive housing units and the types of services that areneeded in supportive housing for one or both of these populations in the Rochester, Minnesota area:A. Scope of the ChallengeEach January, homeless shelters and transitional housing providers in Olmsted County take part in anannual “point in time” survey of homeless persons. This is part of a statewide and national count thatthe Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) uses to determine the number ofhomeless persons in the country. On the one-night count in January 2011, the SE Point in TimeSurvey found 92 people who were sheltered in emergency shelter or transitional housing in OlmstedCounty. Of these, 71 people were in families with children. Another one individual was counted asunsheltered on this night because he did not have a stable place to live and was sleeping outside orin a place not meant for human habitation.Key Informant interviews conducted for this study indicate that many more families and youth thanare currently counted are homeless or at serious risk of homelessness. These young people andfamilies are part of a larger at‐risk population within the area – people with low incomes who movearound from apartment to apartment, couch to couch, due primarily to low incomes and high rentalhousing costs.Exactly how many families and youth are homeless or at risk of homelessness is difficult to say, butthe data and opinions shared for this report by housing and service providers suggests that anestimated 200 to 300 families and 60 to 100 unaccompanied youth under the age of 25 arehomeless or at imminent risk of homelessness each year in Rochester and Olmsted County Theyalso suggest that 30 to 50 homeless families and 25 to 40 homeless youth could benefit from thedevelopment of permanent supportive housing in the community.B. Key Findings Number of Homeless Families In 2011, there were 170 families with 304 children who were sheltered in Rochester due to domestic violence or homelessness or both. For the 2010-2011 school year, there were 314 children who met the definition of homeless in Olmsted County schools. In addition to the 109 who were sheltered, there were 182 who were doubled up with other friends/family and 23 staying in a hotel/motel. 4
  • 5. The Community Reinforcement and Family Transitions Project (CRAFT) estimates that thereare 20 young women/year who cannot get their very young children (age newborn – 2) backfrom foster care because they can’t find or afford housing.In recent months, approximately 43 homeless families are turned away each month from theWomen’s Shelter, Salvation Army Transitional Housing, Olmsted County Community ActionProgram’s Family Homeless Prevention Program, and Zumbro Valley Mental Health Center’sHomeless Outreach Program.There are typically 5 homeless families/year in the Salvation Army’s transitional housingprogram.In the past year, about 86 families with 181 children who were homeless or at risk ofhomelessness received assistance from programs that prevent homelessness or rapidly re-house those who have become homeless.Estimate of Number of Homeless YouthThe Youth Survey from November 2011 identified 60 young people (ages 12 to 24) inRochester who were living in unstable situations. These included emergency shelter,hotel/motel, doubled up with friends/family, empty building or car, foster care, or in anotherplace that was not their own.The Minnesota Department of Education reported that there were 104 unaccompanied youthcounted as homeless in the Olmsted County Public Schools in the 2010-2011 school year. So far, inthe 2011-2012 school year, 47 unaccompanied homeless youth have been identified in theRochester Public Schools.Each year, about 58 unaccompanied youth (ages 17-25) without children receive homelessprevention assistance through the LINK FHPAP program previously operated by the RochesterYMCA but now run by Lutheran Social Services.Over the past 6 months years, the Homeless Service Team has worked with 12 individualsages 18-25 who are homeless.At any given time, there are typically 8 homeless youth receiving housing assistance andsupportive services through Lutheran Social Service’s LINK transitional housing program foryouth.TrendsThe population of students experiencing homelessness in the Olmsted County public schoolshas increased steadily throughout the last five years. This increase is attributed to thechanging economic times, as well as to efforts to increase awareness within the district.The number of homeless families staying at the Dorothy Day Shelter has increased over thepast three years, from 15 families with 29 children in 2009 to 25 families with 61 children in 5
  • 6. 2011. Dorothy Day is not designed to shelter families, and families typically stay here as alast resort when they don’t meet the entry requirements for Interfaith House of Hospitality orother options are full.DemographicsThere are very young children in Rochester who are experiencing homelessness with theirparents. There were 24 children under 5 who were sheltered at the Interfaith HospitalityNetwork in 2011. Of the 147 children whose families were assisted by the HomelessPrevention and Rapid Rehousing Program, 59 were age 5 or under (40%). For families inTransitional Housing in a two-year period, 16 of 30 children (53%) were age 5 or under.Homeless youth and youth at risk of homelessness are disproportionately youth of color.The families who participate in the Salvation Army’s Transitional Housing Program arepredominantly in the age range of 18 to 30, and are typically single females with children.The families who receive homeless prevention and rapid rehousing assistance have moreparents in the 31-50 age group.Of the 314 children identified as homeless in Olmsted County Public Schools in 2010-2011, 8are pre-K, 220 are in elementary schools and 86 are in secondary schools.For youth that seek help from the Family Homeless Prevention and Assistance Program,nearly all (94 youth, 91%) had their last permanent housing in Minnesota, Of these, 85 youthlast had permanent housing in Olmsted County, and another 5 last lived in other SE MNcounties.Living SituationsFor families that participate in transitional housing, most came from emergency shelter.Due to a lack of shelters for this population, youth who are homeless or at risk ofhomelessness are typically doubled up. Sixty percent of youth households receiving FHPAPassistance were staying with a family member or friend prior to seeking FHPAP assistance.For youth that seek help from existing programs or identify a need for housing, their currenthousing situation is often short term. Two-thirds of youth households receiving FHPAPassistance had been in their living situation for three months or less.Shelter and Housing NeedsFor youth surveyed in November 2011, affordable rental housing was identified most oftenas being really needed, with permanent supportive housing being identified as the secondhighest need. 6
  • 7. Service NeedsHelp with Higher Education/College and Employment Services are the highest priority needsof unaccompanied young people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.Young parents who are homeless or at risk of homelessness need help meeting basic needs(clothing, childcare, dental) but also desire assistance with services to help them improvetheir situation (higher education, budgeting/credit, and employment).BarriersDomestic violence and disabilities each affect 43% of the adults in families that entertransitional housing.Of the families who receive services from Olmsted County Community Action’s FamilyHomeless Prevention and Assistance Program, very low incomes are a major barrier. Twelveout of 22 families ( 55%) had incomes at or below 50% of federal poverty level.Lack of employment is the biggest barrier identified by youth who are homeless or at risk ofhomelessness. Of youth households receiving FHPAP assistance, 93% lack steady full-timeemployment.Lack of credit and rental history are also high barriers for youth who are homeless or at riskof homelessness. Of youth households receiving FHPAP assistance, 78% said they lack credithistory and 67% lack rental history, both of which could help them secure rental housing.Of the youth 18 and over who completed the youth survey, just 11% had graduated fromhigh school. 7
  • 8. II. Needs Assessment Partners, Background and ProcessThis report is the an assessment of need, based on data from Olmsted County agencies that providehousing and services to individuals and/or families that are homeless or at risk of homelessness. Thereport was developed by Center City Housing Corporation (CCHC) in order to determine the need forthe creation of permanent supportive housing for one or both of these populations:A. Key Partners in Needs Assessment Center City Housing Corporation Center City Housing Corporation, a Duluth-based nonprofit developer, owns and/or manages quality housing opportunities statewide and provides associated services for those most in need. To implement this mission, staff from Center City Housing Corporation consult with communities concerned about homeless and partner with interested municipalities, civic groups, and service providers to plan for an develop affordable and supportive housing. In 2011, Center City Housing Corporation, opened Silver Creek Corner, a Permanent Supportive Housing residence in Rochester for individuals who have experienced homelessness and chronic substance abuse. This building has forty single residency occupancy units with meals provided. It is a collaborative projected between CCHC, Olmsted County Community Services and Olmsted County Housing and Redevelopment Authority Through the development process for Silver Creek Corners, Center City staff met with a wide variety of Rochester and Olmsted County residents, government officials, and social service providers. In addition to learning about the housing needs of the population that Silver Creek Corner was designed to serve, they learned about the needs of families, youth, and young adults in Rochester who lacked stable housing. This report was commissioned by Center City Housing Corporation in order to quantify the numbers and needs of families and unaccompanied youth/young adults (under age 25) and to determine the estimated needs for permanent supportive housing for these populations. Rochester/Southeast Minnesota Continuum of Care Youth Committee The Rochester/Southeast Minnesota Continuum of Care (CoC) is a collaborative planning process to organize and deliver housing and services to meet the specific needs of people who are homeless. The Continuum’s mission is to prevent, respond to and help end homelessness is Southeastern Minnesota by coordinating services and maximizing resources. The planning region covers 20 counties in Southeast and Southcentral Minnesota and over 75 individual and organizational members participate in the Continuum. 8
  • 9. Building on efforts by Leadership Greater Rochester’s project to raise awareness of homeless youth in 2011, a Youth Committee of the CoC was formed to document the needs of homeless youth and young adults, to increase awareness of homeless young people, to educate the school districts and service providers about needs and resources for homeless youth , and to support efforts to increase services and housing for this population. In September 2011, a “Young Faces, No Places” conference was organized for school district homeless liaisons and providers. The goal was to assist individuals who work with children and youth to identify students who are experiencing homelessness, and to encourage coordinated efforts with them to end homelessness for students who are experiencing it. In November and December 2011, the Youth Committee also conducted a youth needs assessment survey with trained volunteers. The goal was to better understand the needs of homeless youth, and over 400 surveys with completed. The information gathered through this survey is a valuable and timely resource for Center City Housing Corporation and other organizations and individuals who are working to provide or expand services to homeless youth. Members of the CoC Youth Committee have worked closely with staff from Center City to identify key resource people and data sources that form the basis of this report.B. BackgroundIn addition to building on the planning and awareness-building work of the SE CoC Youth Committeeand Leadership Greater Rochester, this needs assessment builds on planning work conducted byHeading Home Rochester/Olmsted County1. This group, in putting a plan to end homelessness inRochester in ten years, identified the following goals for addressing the needs of homeless youth: Goal 2: Develop an on-site housing option for homeless youth and secure funding for supportive and outreach services. Strategies: o Obtain funding to renovate/build a single –site housing facility to provide supported housing, and limited emergency housing, for approximately 20 youth (single and those with families). o Obtain funding for case management and related service needs to assist youth in reaching personal and housing stability. o Develop service, facility, and funding options to address needs of youth at risk of homelessness.1 Heading Home Olmsted County: A Plan to End Longterm Homelessness in Rochester and Olmsted County, HeadingHome Olmsted Committee, 2008 9
  • 10. C. Key Questions to be Answered by Needs AssessmentThe questions to be answered through the examination of existing data sources on needs and serviceutilization and interviews with key informants were: 1. How many homeless families with children do we have in the Rochester/Olmsted County area? How has this been trending over time? 2. What do we know about families without stable housing in terms of their demographic characteristics, service needs, location, and the prevalence of specific barriers to housing (e.g. lack of employment, substance abuse), etc.? 3. How many unaccompanied homeless youth and young adults (under 25) do we have in the Rochester/Olmsted County area? How many have children of their own? 4 . What do we know about homeless youth in terms of their demographic characteristics, service needs, location, and the prevalence of specific barriers to housing (e.g. lack of employment, substance abuse), etc.? 5. What are the key gaps in meeting the needs of homeless families and unaccompanied homeless youth? How many permanent supportive housing units are needed?D. Needs Assessment Process Key Informants During the fall 2011 and winter 2012, informational meetings were held with Olmsted County agencies that provide services to youth and families who lack stable housing. These included:  Interfaith Hospitality Network,  Dorothy Day House of Hospitality,  Women’s Shelter,  The Salvation Army Social Services  Olmsted County Health and Human Services, Adult Division  Olmsted County Health and Human Services, Children and Families Division  Zumbro Valley Mental Health Center Homeless Outreach Team  Community Reinforcement and Family Transitions Project (CRAFT)  Civic Inn  Olmsted Community Action  Rochester School District Families in Transition Program  Rochester/Southeast MN CoC Youth Committee 10
  • 11. Data Collection and AnalysisA wide variety of organizations and agencies aided Center City Housing Corporation tounderstand the needs of families, youth and young adults in Olmsted County who lack stablehousing. This data helps to paint a picture of the type of housing and supportive services that isneeded. Reports and data were shared by:  Lutheran Social Services LINK Program  HEARTH Connection  Three Rivers Community Action  The Salvation Army  Rochester Public Schools (ISD # 535)  Dorothy Day House of Hospitality  Women’s Shelter  Minnesota Housing Finance Agency  Olmsted County Community Action  Zumbro Valley Mental Health Center  Minnesota Department of Education 11
  • 12. III. Key Informant SummaryA. Challenges with Identifying Homeless Families  They are living with friends or family.  They are living in condemned buildings.  There are homeless families living at the 24 hour laundromat.  There is one homeless family seen walking in the Skywalk on a regular basis.  The Civic Inn is often the housing location of last resort for families. They will provide a room to homeless families when no one else will take them, but it is not appropriate housing for families with children due to the number of felons staying there.  Families live in hotels on a weekly basis if they cannot afford to rent an apartment.  There is no clear access point for homeless families, so it is difficult to count the number of unduplicated families who lack stable housing. Lack of clear access point can also require families to travel from agency to agency to get help.B. Number of Homeless Families  Approximately 250 households served per year at The Salvation Army are homeless or at risk of homelessness.  The 8-10 families/year that receive shelter at Dorothy Day House of Hospitality have very high barriers.  Zumbro Valley Homeless Outreach Program receives 2-3 calls/week from families who have nowhere to live. Homeless families are referred to Zumbro Valley Mental Health Center because there is nowhere else to refer them to.  CRAFT Project estimates that they serve 20 households/year that need to secure housing in order to get their child(ren) back.  1-2% of students in Rochester School district meet the definition of “in transition”.  There are migrant families who arrive in the spring and live in Senaca Apartments. There are 84 children from migrant families in Rochester public schools.C. Barriers for Homeless Families System Barriers  There is a long waiting list for Section 8 vouchers (4 years); Section 8 list doesn’t move.  Rental housing is not affordable.  There are few rental units available for large families. 12
  • 13.  There are very limited shelter options; Dorothy Day House of is not meant to shelter children;  Transitional Housing is very limited; 7 homeless families turned away just in January.  Some subsidized apartment buildings are poorly managed and are not a good environment.  People of Islamic faith cannot stay in a church, so are not able to use Interfaith Hospitality Network shelter option.  Women with untreated mental illness or chemical dependency can’t stay at the women’s shelter.  Interfaith Hospitality Network only assists a family once/lifetime.  Programs have timelines but few options to refer families to after their stay in shelter or transitional housing.  Programs don’t have the resources to track where families go after leaving shelter.  Some families who would otherwise qualify for Family Homeless Prevention and Assistance cannot receive funds because they will not be able to sustain their housing situation once the assistance is spent.  The County typically runs out of Emergency Assistance before the end of the year. Personal Barriers  Bad credit;  More of the families we are serving have mental health issues.  Learning disabilities are also more prevalent among the families we serve.  Incomes are very low.  We can’t help some families because they can’t sustain housing after our assistance ends.D. Needs of Homeless Families  Rental subsidies.  More supportive services.E. How many units of Permanent Supportive housing are needed forFamilies?  50 units  40 units  35-50 beds.  200 units  20-40 units 13
  • 14. F. Challenges with Identifying Homeless Youth/Young Adults  They are couch-hopping with friends or living with extended family or friends  Some don’t want to be found.  Some young people think LINK is the only resource available to them. If they don’t qualify for LINK, they think they don’t qualify for any other services or resources.  Youth are often unaware of community resources.G. Numbers of Homeless Youth and Young Adults  44 unaccompanied youth are currently served by Y Link.  Since August, the Homeless Outreach Team has worked with 12 homeless young adults (18- 25).H. Barriers for Homeless Youth and Young Adults  Some are under the age of 18 and not with their parents.  There is a lack of housing units specifically for this population.  There is a lack of affordable rental housing.  There is no emergency shelter for youth. Dorothy Day is not appropriate for young people.  Some youth trade sex for a place to stay.I. Needs of Homeless Youth and Young Adults  Employment opportunities.  Affordable housing options.  Support with life skills.J. How many units of Permanent Supportive Housing are needed forHomeless Youth and Young Adults  10 units  25-40 units 14
  • 15. IV. Numbers and Needs of Homeless Families A. Point in Time Homeless Survey Statistics Each January, homeless shelters and transitional housing providers in Olmsted County and Southeastern Minnesota take part in an annual “point in time” survey of homeless persons. This is part of a statewide and national count that the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) uses to determine the number of homeless persons in the country. On the one-night count in January 2011, the Southeast Minnesota Point in Time Survey found 71 people in families with children in Rochester. Point in Time Survey – Rochester Families with Children – January 2011 # HH ADULT ADULT CHILDREN # People Number Number MEN WOMEN (0-17) of Beds of Units (22+) (22+)Salvation Army Transitional 7 0 7 18 25 38 7(Rochester) Housing ProgramWomens Shelter Regional 4 0 4 9 13 22 12 ShelterWomens Shelter International 4 0 4 6 10 13 4 ShelterWomens Shelter Transition 0 0 0 0 0 12 12 HouseSalvation Army Emergency 0 0 0 0 0 0 0(Rochester) Shelter* Rochester HPRP 7 1 7 14 21 0 20Salvation ArmyInterfaith Network of 1 0 1 1 2 14 0Hospitality Network Churchesof GreaterRochesterTOTAL 23 71 99 55 * This program ended in November 2011 and no longer is available. 15
  • 16. B. Annual Service Statistics Emergency Shelter Usage 2011 In 2011, there were 170 families with 304 children who were sheltered in Rochester due to domestic violence or homelessness or both.  Women’s Shelter, Main Building: 85 families with 143 children  Women’s International Shelter: 31 families with 48 children  Dorothy Day: 25 families with 61 children.  Interfaith Hospitality Network: 29 children with 52 children. Total Number of Number of Number of Families Adults Children Women’s Shelter 85 143 International 31 48 Shelter Dorothy Day 25 61 Interfaith 29 31 55 Hospitality Network TOTAL 170 N/A 304 Transitional Housing 2011 There are typically 6-7 homeless families/year who enter the Salvation Army’s transitional housing program. Most come from emergency shelter, and have incomes between $250- $1500/month when they enter. The Salvation Army’s Transitional Housing Program can serve 5 family households at a time. Families stay for 3 months – two years, with most staying between 1-2 years, so there are few openings in the program each year. Number of Number of Number of Total Families Adults Children Salvation 6 7 15 22 Army TH 16
  • 17. Homelessness Prevention and Rapid RehousingIn the past year, about 86 families with 181 children who were homeless or at risk ofhomelessness received assistance from programs that prevent homelessness or rapidly re-housethose who have become homeless. Salvation Army Homeless Prevention and Rapid Rehousing (HPRP). This program, funded by the Federal American Recovery Act, is no longer operating. Between October 2009 and November 2011, however, about 34 homeless families/year received assistance to prevent homelessness or pay their up-front costs to secure new housing upon becoming homeless. Salvation Army RHASP: Between January 2010 and February 2012, 28 homeless families received first month’s rent or deposition to help them secure rental housing. Olmsted County Community Action FHPAP: 23 families were served in the past year. LINK: Between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2011, 16 families with parents under 25, received assistance to prevent or end their homelessness with case management, rent payment assistance, transportation expense assistance, or help with rent deposits. Organization Program Number of Number of Number of Total Families/Year Adults Children Olmsted Family 22 26 34 60 County Homeless Community Prevention Action Assistance and Assistance Program The Salvation Homeless 34 47 74 121 Army Prevention and Rapid Rehousing The Salvation Rural Homeless 14 22 29 51 Army Assistance and Stabilization Program (RHASP) Lutheran LINK for Youth 16 18 44 62 Social Services - FHPAP TOTAL 86 113 181 294 17
  • 18. B. Monthly Turnaways from Homeless Programs for FamiliesBy using the turnaway data from just four programs that serve homeless families or families atimminent risk of homelessness, it can be estimated that there are up to 43 families/month that havenowhere to go for shelter or housing in Rochester.  Women’s Shelter turns away about 20 households a month from its regular shelter and its International Shelter.  The Salvation Army’s Transitional Housing Program for families is also over capacity – in the first two months of 2012, 8 families/month were turned away from the 7 transitional units that the Salvation Army operates for homeless families.  Zumbro Valley Homeless Outreach Project receives about 10 calls/month from homeless families seeking housing assistance through the Homeless Outreach Program -- even though this program doesn’t serve families, and  Olmsted County Community Action Program’s Family Homeless Prevention Assistance and Stabilization Program turns away 4-6 families/month, primarily because the family does not have any ability to sustain their housing after the initial month’s rent is paid by the program.C. McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Homeless Student Count:The Minnesota Department of Education produces a report that contains, by school district, theannual count of homeless children and youth enrolled in Minnesota public schools. The count is thecumulative number of school children and youth who experienced homelessness at some timeduring the 2010-11 school year. School districts/charter schools are required to identify and servestudents lacking a fixed, regular and adequate nighttime residence. The Minnesota Department ofEducation summarizes information reported via the Minnesota Automated Reporting StudentSystems (MARSS) which is used by districts to document students homeless status. The data areverified via a fall annual electronic survey of Title I Directors and school district Homeless Liaisons.Students are counted once as homeless - when first enrolled in a school or when first identified ashomeless during the school year. The student continues to be eligible for services through the end ofthe school year, even if permanently housed. The nighttime residence is recorded only once - uponenrollment or when first identified, even if a student and family moves several times during theschool year.The tables below show the 2010-2011 Homeless Student Count for the Rochester school district, thecount for all Olmsted County Districts, and the trend in the number of homeless students counted inthe Rochester school district from 2005-2006 school district to the 2010-2011 school year. 18
  • 19. State and Local Homeless Student Count by District 2010-2011:This chart shows the number of homeless students counted in Rochester and Olmsted County forthe 2010-2011 school year. The Olmsted County count includes the Rochester Count.Minnesota Homeless Student Count Enroll Economi Homeless c Status Count School District/ TOTAL TOTAL PERCENT TOTAL - PERCENT Number District/ Charter County Charter Name ENROLL- Students - OF TOTAL Homeless OF TOTALRegion School Name Type MEN T Free Students - students Students - Meals Free Meals Homeless 2010-11 897,426 270,059 30% 11,076 1.2% STATE TOTALS 0 1 535 ROCHESTER 17,972 5,628 31% 306 1.7% Olmsted 1 PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICT Olmsted: 9 25,444 7,099 27.9% 314 1.2% = 5 regular districts, 3 charters, 1 spec ed. districtOf the 314 children and youth identified as homeless in the Olmsted County public schools, 201(64%) were living with their parents; 69 (22%) were living with another adult, and 35 were living ontheir own. Those who are living with another adult or on their own are considered to be“unaccompanied youth”.Trend - State and Local Homeless Student Count by District:This chart compares the Rochester homeless child count for 2005-06 to 2010-11 school years.Minnesota Homeless Student 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11Count STATEWIDE COUNT 5,741 5,462 7,571 7,760 9,366 11,078 7,297 6008 8,417 8,406 9,858 11,278 SCHOOL survey survey survey + survey + MARSS MARSS DISTRICT/CHARTER MARSS MARSS (both) (both) NAME DIST # CNTY TYPE ROCHESTER PUBLIC 59 59 114 141 213 306 Olmsted SCHOOL DISTRICT 535 1 19
  • 20. Growth in Identified Homeless Children in Rochester Public Schools 350 Number of Students 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 Series1 59 59 114 141 213 306Current Housing SituationOf the 314 children who met the definition of homeless in Olmsted County schools, there were109 staying in an emergency shelter, 182 who were doubled up with other friends/family, and23 staying in a hotel/motel. Living Situation of Homeless Students in Olmsted County Schools 0% 7% 35% Sheltered Doubled Up Unsheltered Hotel/Motel 58% 20
  • 21. Demographics Of the 314 children identified as homeless in Olmsted County Public Schools in 2010-2011, 8 are pre-K, 220 are in elementary schools and 86 are in secondary schools. Students identified as homeless in Olmsted County Public Schools are disproportionately children of color, as shown by the following chart. Comparison of Background of All Olmsted County Students with Homeless Students: 2010-2011 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0%Axis Title 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% PERCENT of PERCENT of PERCENT of PERCENT of PERCENT of PERCENT TOTAL TOTAL TOTAL Homeless - Homeless - Homeless - Students - Students - Students - Black Hispanic White Black Hispanic White Series1 10.9% 46.2% 6.3% 13.4% 74.8% 33.8% 21
  • 22. V. Current Shelter and Housing Resources for HomelessFamilies with ChildrenA. Emergency Shelter Dorothy Day Hospitality House: This house has 14 beds and is designed to shelter homeless single adults. Sometimes families stay at Dorothy Day if space is available. Women’s Shelter: Main Building: The Women’s Shelter provides temporary shelter for women and children who are fleeing abuse. Shelter is available in one 7-bedroom house and one four-bedroom house. Women’s Shelter: International House: The Women’s Shelter has a four bedroom house that provides shelter from domestic violence for women from other countries who are living or working in Rochester. Women and children receive many services to help them become stable and move out into independence. Interfaith Hospitality Network: IHN can shelter up to 14 people at a time for up to 30 days. The program serves families only and operates in a series of rotating churches. The Salvation Army: Emergency motel vouchers are used when there are no other housing options. Vouchers are limited to a maximum of one week, usually one night at a time.B. Transitional Housing The Salvation Army Transitional Housing: This program is for homeless families. There are nine apartments with 35 beds. Families can stay up to 24 months. They pay 30% of their monthly income for rent and receive case management and support services to help them reach goals for independent living. Interfaith House of Hospitality Transition House: IHN has a 5-bedroom house that can be used by shelter participants who need an extra stay of 1-3 months before moving on. One family at a time can stay at this house, paying 30% of their income the first month, 40% the second month, and 50% the third month. Women’s Shelter Transition House: The Women’s Shelter has an 11-bedroom transitional home that women can stay at if they need 22
  • 23. C. Homeless Prevention and Rapid Rehousing Programs Salvation Army Homeless Prevention and Rapid Rehousing (HPRP). The Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program was an economic stimulus program of the Department of Housing and Urban Development through the Minnesota Office of Economic Opportunity. Low income households who could meet HUD’s definition of Homeless or were at imminent risk for homelessness could be assisted with short term rental assistance, case management, and other support services. Salvation Army RHASP: The Rural Housing Assistance and Stability Program assists homeless families and individuals with first month’s rent or deposit to help them become re-housed after an episode of homelessness. Olmsted County Community Action FHPAP: This program provides homeless prevention assistance to keep people from losing their housing. Services include rent, some case management, budget counseling, information and referral. Olmsted Community Action serves families and individuals over the age of 25 in Olmsted County. Lutheran Social Services LINK FHPAP LINK helps prevent homelessness for youth and young parents to keep them from becoming homeless. Services include rent, some case management, budget counseling, information and referral.D. Permanent Supportive HousingPermanent Supportive Housing (PSH) is defined as: permanent, affordable housing withcomprehensive supportive services for people who are chronically homeless with disabilities or othersubstantial barriers to housing stabilityPSH is an intensive model of housing and services designed to serve chronically homeless individualsand high resource using families who cannot retain stable housing without tightly linked supportiveservices, and who cannot successfully utilize the clinical services they need to stabilize their liveswithout having housing.Currently there is no permanent supportive housing for families in Rochester. 23
  • 24. E. Permanent Subsidized Housing2 Privately-owned Section 8 Buildings Rochester has 12 subsidized rental projects providing rental opportunities for lower income people. Many of these units serve very low-income people and charge rent based on 30% of the tenant’s household income. Of these units, 627 are for senior occupancy (which may also include handicapped and disabled tenants), 67 are prioritized for handicapped and disabled tenants and 479 are for general occupancy. Combined, these projects have 1,173 rental units. Tenant-Based Section 8 The County HRA operates the tenant-based Section 8 Existing Rent Assistance Program, which provides rent subsidy to 522 households. Currently, the Olmsted County HRA has a tenant based Section 8 waiting list consisting of 1,630 applicants, of whom 62 are in need for 4+ bedrooms. The waiting list is currently closed at this time because it is over four years long and the Olmsted County HRA has issued their maximum number of vouchers. Public Housing The Olmsted County HRA operates public housing programs for all of Olmsted County, including the City of Rochester. The HRA is continually working to improve the quality of life in public housing. There is a shortage of affordable housing units within the City of Rochester. The HRA owns and manages a total of 109 public housing units in the City of Rochester. They are working aggressively to secure state and federal funds to provide additional affordable housing units. The 109 public units consist of: Homestead Green with 30 units, Homestead Terrace with 29 units, Westwood with 30 units and 20 single-family homes (scattered sites). Other Rental Assistance Programs In addition to administering the public housing units, HRA administered two types of rental assistance. Tenant based where the assistance follows the tenant and project based where the participant must live in a particular unit (project) to receive assistance. These programs are the Housing Opportunity Program (HOP), Transitional Rent Assistance Program and Section 8 Vouchers. HOP is a partnership with Zumbro Valley Mental Health Center (ZVMHC). ZVMHC Community Support Services refers all applicants to this program. Applicants must have a serious and persistent mental illness diagnosis. This program is designed to be similar to the Section 8 program and provides short-term rental assistance until the participant receives Section 8. This program serves an average of 25 households per month. Households rent a unit from a private2 Information in this section is from: Consolidated Plan for Housing and Community Development 2010-2014, City ofRochester, October 2009 24
  • 25. landlord who agrees with the conditions of the program. Rent assistance is provided by the HRAand support services are provided by ZVMHC. Maximum rent subsidy is $250 per month.Transitional Rent Assistance Program (T-RAP) is a program funded by the Minnesota HousingFinance Agency that is used to serve single female heads of household with at least one minorchild, households of color and the homeless or near homeless. Households must have incomesbelow 30% of the median income. The maximum rent assistance is $250. The HRA serves 26households through TRAP. 25
  • 26. VI. Numbers and Needs of Homeless Youth/Young AdultsUnder the Age of 25A. Youth Needs Assessment Survey – November 2011In November 2011, the Youth Subcommittee of the Rochester/Southeast Minnesota Continuum ofCare conducted a survey, targeted to youth at risk of homelessness. There were 308 surveyscompleted by youth and young adults, ages 12-25) in Rochester and another 100 surveys completedin other communities in Southeast Minnesota.This survey was not meant to be a scientific study that can be extrapolated to determine the totalnumber and percentage of youth who are homeless or at risk of homelessness in Rochester andSoutheast Minnesota. Rather, it was meant to identify as many precariously housed youth and youngadults as possible, in order to plan housing and support services to meet their needs.Demographic Profile of Survey RespondentsIn Rochester, there were 308 youth and young adults (ages 12-25) who completed the survey. o 51% female; 49% male o 53% Youth of Color; (20% black; 9% bi-racial; 8% Asian); 56.4% White o Forty-five survey respondents (15.2%) have children of their own. o Just 11% of survey respondents 18 and older had graduated from high school. Gender by Age 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 44 39 29 26 26 21 22 19 14 12 7 7 8 8 6 5 4 2 1 1 2 2 1 Female Male 26
  • 27. Current Living Situation: Living Situation Last Night 1%  Most (75%) were living in their own home. 0% In my own 5% home (230 youth) 0% 6%  Another 8% (24 youth) were living with friends Shelter or family. 1% 8%  Seventeen (17) were living in a place that was 4% Hotel/Motel not their own (6%).  Thirteen (4%) were living in a shelter. With Friends 75%  Others were living in a hotel motel (2 youth); in an empty building or car (1) or in foster care On Street (3). Homelessness History A total of 72 youth from Rochester indicated on the survey that they have been homeless on their own at some point in their lives, and a total of 57 youth who said that they have been homeless with their families at least once. There is an overlap of 25 youth who have been homeless on their own AND with their families. The responses vary by the race of the respondents, with black youth more likely than white youth to have been homeless with their family (36% vs. 14%), and more likely to have been homeless on their own (27% versus 21%). Also… of the 45 youth with children of their own, nearly half (47%) had been homeless on their own and 29% had been homeless with their families. Overall, 21% of the respondents (60 out of 291 responses to this question) reported not living in their own home. While we cannot make assumptions about the stability of those who live with friends/family (24 youth) or those who live in a place that is not their own (17), there is no doubt that those who live in a shelter (13), in a hotel motel (2), or in an empty building/car (1) meet the definition of homelessness and those that live in foster care (3) are at high risk of homelessness. Shelter and Housing Needs Youth were asked about the types of housing really needed. The options were Shelter, Transitional Housing, Affordable Rental Housing, and Supportive Housing/Permanent Supportive Housing. Not surprisingly, affordable rental housing was identified most often as being really needed, with permanent supportive housing being identified as the second highest need. Both types of housing have some type of subsidy to make them affordable to persons with low incomes, but permanent supportive housing includes on-site supportive services to help tenants maintain housing stability. Although, of those who said they really need affordable rental housing (54), thirty-two respondents also said they “really need” permanent housing/supportive housing, there were some differences 27
  • 28. between youth who indicated that they really needed affordable rental housing and those who reallyneeded permanent housing/permanent supportive housing. Youth living with friends/family were more likely to indicate a need for affordable rental housing than for permanent supportive housing, 50% vs. 29% The average age of youth who indicated a need for permanent supportive housing was a bit younger than youth who indicated a need for affordable rental housing (16.5 years vs. 17.1 years). A higher percentage of the youth who indicated a need for affordable rental housing were female (61.1%) versus the percentage of youth who indicated a need for permanent supportive housing (57.9% female). Affordable Rental Housing: This type of housing was identified as being really needed by 54 youth (18.6%). Of these, 29 youth were living in their own home, and 12 were living with friends/family. o Youth who identified a need for affordable rental housing or permanent supportive housing were more likely to have children of their own. o Half of the youth currently living with friends/family said they really needed affordable rental housing. o Youth who indicated a need for affordable rental housing were less likely to have graduated from high school than those who indicated a need for shelter or transitional housing. The graduation percentages were 16% for youth needing affordable rental housing, 21% for youth needing transitional housing, and 30% for those needing shelter. Emergency Shelter: Emergency Shelter was “really needed” by 11 youth (3.8%) and Transitional Housing: was really needed by 15 youth (5.2%). o Youth who indicated that they really needed shelter were living in more precarious locations than those indicating a need for other types of housing. A higher percentage of youth needed shelter were living in a hotel/motel, living with family/friends, and living in a car or outside. o Youth who identified a need for shelter were much more likely to have been homeless with their family. Of those who had been homeless with their family, 63% said they really needed shelter. o Of youth who identified a need for shelter and transitional housing, there was a higher percentage of youth of color than those who identified a need for affordable rental housing or permanent supportive housing. o Youth who really needed shelter or transitional housing were much more likely to be concerned about having a permanent place to live. 28
  • 29. Resource Needs:The resource used the most in the past 12 months (by 42 out of 296 respondents) was free food(such as Food Shelves, Channel One, or the Backpack program). The resources being used most atthe time of the survey were dental services (61 youth), medical services (57), and free food (54).Employment services are the highest priority need. They were identified as “really needed” by73 youth (24.7% of all respondents). Sexual Health Services and Mental Health Services wereidentified as lower priority needs.  Highest priority service needs for youth who really need shelter are: o Help with Higher Education o Dental Services o Employment Services.  For youth who said they really need transitional housing, highest service needs are: o Independent Living Skills o Budgeting/Credit Classes o EBT Card (Food Support)  Highest priority service needs for youth who really need affordable rental housing are: o Help with Higher Education/College o Independent Living Skills o Budgeting/Credit Classes  For youth who said they need permanent supportive housing, highest service needs are: o Help with Higher Education/College o Independent Living Skills o Budgeting/Credit Classes  Overall, the services most often identified as “really needed” are: o Help with Higher Education/College (82 youth) o Employment Services (73) o Costs for Activities (Shoes, Equipment, Transportation, Instruments, etc..) (59 youth) o Independent Living Skills Classes (56) o Dental Services (54) o Budgeting/Credit Classes (53). 29
  • 30. Resource Needs of Youth/Young Adults with ChildrenHighest areas of resources and services needed by youth/young adults with children (45youth/young adults) were:  Clothing closet (12)  Child Care Assistance (12)  Help with Higher Education/College (11)  Budgeting/Credit Classes (10)  Dental Services (10)  Employment Services (9)  EBT Food Support (8)  Independent Living Skills Classes (8)  Costs for Activities (8)  MFIP/Diversionary Work Program (8)  Transportation (8)  Household goods (8) Service Needs of Youth/ Young Adults with Children Series1 12 12 11 10 10 10 9 8 8 8 8 8 7 7 6 5 5 5 5 4 44 3 3 3 2 2 2 22 2 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 0 0 0 0 0 30
  • 31. B. Family Homeless Prevention and Assistance Program (FHPAP): ServiceStatistics for Lutheran Social Services LINK Program : 7/1/09-6/30/11Lutheran Social Services’ LINK (Living Independently with Knowledge ) Program was previously run bythe YMCA of Rochester, but has been offered by Lutheran Social Services since January 1, 2012. Oneof the services offered through LINK is homeless prevention assistance for youth under the age of 25,through Minnesota’s Family Homeless Prevention and Assistance Program.This program is used to help young people avert homeless through first month’s rent assistance,rental deposits, and short term supportive services. Because it is one of the few resources availableto help young people who are homeless or at risk of becoming homelessness, it is a good source ofinformation on the numbers and needs of young people who are homeless or precariously housed inthe Rochester area.During the two year time-frame for the most recent FHPAP grant for LINK, there were 155unduplicated participants. There were 16 family households and 116 single individuals withoutchildren. There were 65 single females and 51 single males. The majority of participants (70%) werebetween the ages of 18-21. The households served included 45 children ages infant to 17 (29% oftotal).Twenty-three households were under the age of 18. There was one single female parent, 16 singlefemales without children, and 6 single sales without children. Background of Participants: Over half (52.5%) of the youth and young adults who received homeless prevention through FHPAP were young people of color. Race of Youth who Received Black or African- 0% Homeless Prevention through American youth made up 41.9% of 1% 1% FHPAP 2% 1% White participants. 1% 4% Black or African American Asian 48% Black and White 42% Other American Indian or Alaska Native 31
  • 32. Characteristics of Family Households  Couples with children = 2  Female single parent = 13 o Under 18 = 1  Male single parent = 1Housing and Homelessness StatusOf all the youth households served, 42% met Minnesota’s definition of homelessness (60 out of144). Households headed by youth under 18 were much less likely to be homeless (21%, 5households) than households 18-21 (46%, 55 households)Most youth had been in their housing situation for less than three months, except for those whowere staying or living in a family member’s room, apartment or house. Of those youth, 43% hadbeen staying there for one year or longer.Eighteen households (13%) had experienced multiple episodes of homelessness, and fourhouseholds (3%) met Minnesota’s definition of long-term homeless by experiencing fourepisodes of homelessness in 3 years or one year of continuous homelessness. Emergency Shelter, including hotel or motel Living Situation Last Night: paid for with emergency shelter voucher n=144 households Hotel or motel paid for without emergency shelter voucher. 1% 1% 1% 2% Place not meant for habitation – inclusive of non-housing service site. 4% Transitional Housing for homeless persons. 4% 7% 2% Staying or living in a family member’s room, 17% apartment or house Staying or living in a friend’s room, apartment or house Rent by Client, no housing subsidy. Substance Abuse treatment facility or detox 33% center. Rent by client, with other housing subsidy. 28% Permanent housing for formerly homeless persons. Foster care home or foster care group home. 32
  • 33. Barriers.Lack of employment is the biggest barrier identified by youth who are homeless or at risk ofhomelessness. Of youth households receiving FHPAP assistance, 93% lack steady full-timeemployment.Lack of credit and rental history are also high barriers for youth who are homeless or at risk ofhomelessness. Of youth households receiving FHPAP assistance, 78% said they lack credithistory and 67% lack rental history, both of which could help them secure rental housing. Tenant Barriers 80 Number of Participants: Two Year 70 60 50 40 30 Period 20 10 0 One or Unpaid 1 Lack of Lack of Poor more Other rent or Critical eviction/ credit Rental referenc misdeme felony utility felony unlawful history History e anors bills detainer Series1 73 63 10 9 8 8 6 4 Income Barriers 100 Number of Participants: Two Year Perior 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Lacks Lacks steady Lacks high Lacks reliable reliable/ Lacks English full-time school transportatio affordable proficiency employment diploma n child care Series1 87 52 44 19 1 33
  • 34. VII. Current Shelter and Housing Resources for HomelessYouth and Young AdultsA. Emergency Shelter There are no shelter resources specifically for youth. Youth over 18 can stay at the Dorothy Day Hospitality House, but this house is not designed for young people.B. Transitional Housing Lutheran Social Services LINK Transitional Housing: This program is for homeless youth ages 18-21 who are going to school or working. It provides rent subsidies for scattered site rental units to help homeless youth get a stable living arrangement. Up to 8 youth households can be in the program at one time.C. Homeless Prevention and Rapid Rehousing Programs Lutheran Social Services LINK FHPAP LINK helps prevent homelessness for youth and to keep them from becoming homeless. Services include rent, some case management, budget counseling, information and referral.D. Permanent Supportive Housing Permanent supportive housing is affordable, meaning tenants pay no more than 30% of their income toward housing costs. Permanent supportive housing recognizes that for many individual and families who have experienced homelessness, access to quality, community-based supportive services can ensure a successful tenancy in the housing. As such, supportive housing is linked with voluntary and flexible supportive services to support tenancy and address other needs Currently there is no permanent supportive housing specifically for youth in Rochester, but young adults who are age 18 or over can participate in the following permanent supportive housing programs if there are vacancies and if they meet other entry requirements. Castleview: Castleview is The Salvation Armys first permanent, supportive housing complex in Rochester. The apartments are for single adults. Social services support and life-skills education programs are provided. Half 16 the 32 units are reserved for disabled or homeless persons. The remaining units will be rented to low-income individuals. Francis Apartments: The Francis provides permanent supportive housing to 17 homeless individuals in self contained efficiency apartments. On-site support staff is provided by 34
  • 35. Olmsted County Community Services. The property is owned and managed by the Olmsted County Housing & Redevelopment Authority. Homeless Services Team: This partnership between Olmsted County Adult Services and Zumbro Valley Mental Health Center services single individuals who have experienced long-term homelessness. Intensive case management services and provided along with a variety of services such as laundry, grocery shopping, applying for benefits, mental and chemical health support, and assistance with medical and dental needs.E. Permanent Subsidized Housing There are no specific permanent subsidized housing options for youth. Youth over the age of 18 can lease Section 8 and public housing units and are eligible to apply for Section 8. 35

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