The creative problem solving pack powerpoint
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    The creative problem solving pack powerpoint The creative problem solving pack powerpoint Presentation Transcript

    • The Creative Problem Solving Pack
    • Introduction The following pages provide separate packs that you can use in the following situations. * Creative problem solving with individuals. * Creative problem solving with teams. You can use the approach in your own life and work or, for example, when working with individuals or teams. You can then create a stimulating sanctuary and enable them to go through the various steps. People can use the approach to find solutions to challenges or to make decisions.
    • The approach is structured. But, after awhile, people will go through it quickly. Peak performers sometimes use what is called ‘strategic intuition’. But this is often based on years of experience and the framework they use for making decisions. These materials provide such a framework. The packs are designed to stand alone. You can use each one separately and distribute these to individuals or teams. There is therefore quite a lot of repetition in the Introduction and each pack. There are many models for creative problem solving. This material focuses on the 3C model. It encourages people to focus on Clarity, Creativity and Concrete Results.
    • Creative Problem Solving People can keep focusing on: Clarity Creativity Concrete Results
    • The following pages outline the main themes – and sub-themes - that can be explored at each stage. The model also aims to get the right balance between Fast Thinking and Slow Thinking. As Carl Honoré points out in his book In Praise of Slow, some of our best breakthroughs come when we give ourselves time to reflect. So it may be useful to build in time for reflection, especially when considering the possible options. This can lead to making breakthroughs and then being fully committed to the chosen way forward. So here is the overall framework. This is followed by the packs that can be used with individuals and with teams. You can, of course, adapt these in your way.
    • Creative Problem Solving People can keep focusing on: Clarity * Challenges. The specific challenge to tackle is: ‘How to ___?’ * Clarity. The real results to achieve are: * Controllables. The things that are controllable in the situation are: Creativity * Choices. The possible options for achieving the results are: * Consequences. The pluses and minuses of each option are: * Creative solutions. The other possible creative solutions are: Concrete Results * Conclusions. The route to follow is: * Contracts. The contracts to make to achieve the results are: * Concrete results. The specific action plan for achieving the results is:
    • Clarity People are invited to work through the following themes at this stage.
    • Challenges People are invited to brainstorm the challenges they face and choose one topic they want to tackle. They are asked to write this in positive and ‘How to ___’ terms. For example: ‘How to be healthy’ rather than ‘How to stop being sick’. ‘How to be a successful team’ rather than ‘How to stop arguing’. They can also, if appropriate, describe more about the challenge and the aims they want to achieve.
    • Clarity This is a vital step. People are invited to establish the real ‘What’ – the real results they want to achieve. People need to know what mountain they are climbing before moving on to the ‘How’. It may be that want to achieve several goals. If so, people are invited to list these in order of priority. Controllables Peak performers focus on ‘controlling the controllables’. So people are invited to focus on the things they can control in the situation. They can then build on what they can control and manage what they can’t.
    • Creativity People are invited to work through the following themes at this stage.
    • Choices People are invited to describe the potential options they have for tackling the situation. For example: Option A is: To ____. Option B is: To ____. Option C is: To ____. It is good to outline all the possible options, even those they are not going to pursue. This helps to clear the mind and get those options out of the way. Consequences People are invited to describe the pluses and minuses of each option. They can also list the attractiveness of each option. They can do this on a scale 0 – 10.
    • The Possible Options Pluses: ____ Minuses: __ ____ / 10 The attractiveness of each option is: The possible options going forward are: C * To _______ A * To ______ B * To ______ Pluses: ____ Minuses: __ ____ / 10 Pluses: ____ Minuses: __ ____ / 10
    • Creative Solutions People are invited to be creative and use their imagination to list any other potential solutions. For example: “What are the best parts of each option? Is it possible to combine these into a new option? “What do people know works – either for themselves or for other people? How can they follow these principles in their own way? “Are there any other possible options?”
    • Concrete Results People are invited to work through the following themes at this stage.
    • Conclusions Looking at the various ways forward, people are invited to settle on the route they want to follow. Sometimes they will choose to pursue one main option; sometimes to pursue multiple options. Contracting People are invited consider if they need to make any contracts in order to achieve the goals. Their main contract, of course, is with themselves. Looking at the whole package – the pluses and minuses involved – are they serious? Do they really want to commit to achieving the goals?
    • If so, they may also need to make clear working contracts with other people who can help them to reach the goals. People are invited to look at the contracts they may need to make. They are also asked to rate how serious they are about reaching the goals. They are to do this on a scale 0 – 10. Concrete Results People are asked to make an action plan for delivering the concrete results. They are also invited to build in some early successes. This will encourage them on the journey towards achieving their goals. So here is the material for the two packs.
    • The Individual Creative Problem Solving Pack The 3C Model For Finding Creative Solutions To Challenges
    • Introduction The following pages provides a model you can use for finding creative solutions to challenges. You can also use this approach when helping other people to find solutions. For example, when running a coaching or mentoring session. There are many models for creative problem solving. This one focuses on the 3C Model. It encourages you to focus on clarity, creativity and concrete results. There are several key points when using the model. First, you may want to start by brainstorming various challenges you want to tackle. Then settle on the one you want to explore.
    • Creative Problem Solving You can keep focusing on: Clarity Creativity Concrete Results
    • Second, it is useful to write the challenge in positive and ‘How to …’ terms. For example: ‘How to be healthy’ – rather than – ‘How to stop being sick’. ‘How to find or create satisfying work’ – rather than ‘How to stop feeling frustrated in my job’. Third, it is then important to spend a lot of time on Clarity. Try to establish the real ‘What’ – the real results you want to achieve. It may be that you want to achieve several goals. If so, list these in order of priority.
    • Creative Problem Solving You can keep focusing on: Clarity * Challenges. The specific challenge I want to tackle is: ‘How to ___?’ * Clarity. The real results I want to achieve are: * Controllables. The things I can control in the situation are: Creativity * Choices. The possible options for achieving the results are: * Consequences. The pluses and minuses of each option are: * Creative solutions. The other possible creative solutions are: Concrete Results * Conclusions. The route I want to follow is: * Contracts. The contracts I need to make to achieve the results are: * Concrete results. The specific action plan for achieving the results is:
    • So make sure you establish Clarity. This also involves the things you can control in the situation. You can then move on to Creativity – the ‘How’ and Concrete Results - the ‘When’. The following pages provides an overview of the model. There are several sub-sections under the headings of Clarity, Creativity and Concrete Results. You may or may not want to go through each sub- section. If you do so, however, you will find that - after a while - you go through these quickly to find solutions. The model works, but please adapt it in your own way.
    • The following pages provide a framework you can fill- in to find solutions to a specific challenge. As mentioned earlier, you can also use this approach when enabling other people to find solutions or to make decisions.
    • Clarity Challenges. The specific challenge I want to explore is: * How to (Write this in positive terms.)
    • Here is some more information about the specific situation and some of the goals I want to achieve: * * *
    • Clarity. The real results I therefore want to achieve - in order of priority - are: * To * To * To
    • Controllables. The things I can control in the situation are: * * *
    • Creativity Choices and Consequences. The possible options for tackling the challenge – together with the pluses, minuses and attractiveness - are: a) To The pluses are: The minuses are: The attractiveness of this option is: ______ / 10
    • b) To The pluses are: The minuses are: The attractiveness of this option is: ______ / 10 c) To The pluses are: The minuses are: The attractiveness of this option is: ______ / 10
    • d) To The pluses are: The minuses are: The attractiveness of this option is: ______ / 10 e) To The pluses are: The minuses are: The attractiveness of this option is: ______ / 10
    • Creative Solutions. The other potential creative solutions are: * To * To * To
    • Concrete Results Conclusions. The route – or combination of routes – I want to follow for tackling the challenge and achieving the results is: * To * To * To
    • Contracting. The specific contracts I need to make to ensure the results are delivered are: * To * To * To The extent to which I am committed and serious about delivering the results is: _____ /10
    • Concrete Results. The specific action plan for achieving the results – including getting some early successes - is: * To * To * To
    • The Team Creative Problem Solving Pack The 3C Model For Finding Creative Solutions To Challenges
    • Introduction This pack invites you to involve people to work in teams and find creative solutions to challenges. There are many models for creative problem solving. This one encourages people to focus on clarity, creativity and concrete results. Before the session, prepare Flip Charts that replicate the following slides headed Clarity, Creativity and Concrete Results. Each team should have a complete set of Flip Charts. This is a lot of work, but it makes it easier for people to go through the stages.
    • Creative Problem Solving You can encourage people to keep focusing on: Clarity Creativity Concrete Results
    • Start by explaining the model. Give examples of how it works in practice. Encourage people to do several things. First, to brainstorm the challenges they want to tackle. Then settle on one they want to explore. Second, to write the challenge in positive and ‘How to …’ terms. For example: ‘How to build a successful team’ – rather than ‘How to stop arguing’. Third, to spend a lot of time focusing on Clarity. They need to establish the ‘What’ – the real results to achieve – before moving on to Creativity and the ‘How’.
    • Creative Problem Solving You can invite people to keep focusing on: Clarity * Challenges. The specific challenge we want to tackle is: ‘How to ___?’ * Clarity. The real results we want to achieve are: * Controllables. The things we can control in the situation are: Creativity * Choices. The possible options for achieving the results are: * Consequences. The pluses and minuses of each option are: * Creative solutions. The other possible creative solutions are: Concrete Results * Conclusions. The route we want to follow is: * Contracts. The contracts we need to make to achieve the results are: * Concrete results. The specific action plan for achieving the results is:
    • Ask people to form teams. One person in each team is to act as a facilitator, but they can still share their own ideas. The team is then to go through the following steps. * To focus on a specific challenge they want to tackle. * To work through the stages of clarity, creativity and concrete results. People are also asked to work through each of the sub-sections under each heading. This can seem laborious, but it can be useful for people to go through these steps – at least the first time they use the model. Later this will become second nature.
    • * To present back a summary of: - Clarity: the challenge they chose to tackle and the real results they finally decided they wanted to achieve. - Creativity: some of the potential options they considered. - Concrete Results: their suggested action plan for moving forward and delivering the required results. The exercise can take up to 2 hours to do properly. This includes time for presenting back. But the exercise provides people with a tool for life.
    • People can use this approach: * To be even more self managing. * To make good decisions. * To find creative solutions to challenges. They can then continue to develop both as individuals and as a team in the future.
    • Clarity Challenges. The specific challenge we want to explore is: * How to (Write this in positive terms.)
    • Here is some more information about the specific situation and some of the goals we want to achieve: * * *
    • Clarity. The real results we therefore want to achieve - in order of priority - are: * To * To * To
    • Controllables. The things we can control in the situation are: * * *
    • Creativity Choices and Consequences. The possible options for tackling the challenge – together with the pluses, minuses and attractiveness - are: a) To The pluses are: The minuses are: The attractiveness of this option is: ______ / 10
    • b) To The pluses are: The minuses are: The attractiveness of this option is: ______ / 10 c) To The pluses are: The minuses are: The attractiveness of this option is: ______ / 10
    • d) To The pluses are: The minuses are: The attractiveness of this option is: ______ / 10 e) To The pluses are: The minuses are: The attractiveness of this option is: ______ / 10
    • Creative Solutions. The other potential creative solutions are: * To * To * To
    • Concrete Results Conclusions. The route – or combination of routes – we want to follow for tackling the challenge and achieving the results is: * To * To * To
    • Contracting. The specific contracts we need to make to ensure the results are delivered are: * To * To * To The extent to which we are committed and serious about delivering the results is: _____ /10
    • Concrete Results. The specific action plan for achieving the results – including getting some early successes - is: * To * To * To
    • Finally These pages have provided an overview of one approach to creative problem solving. There are, of course, many other approaches. If you would like more information about this approach or want any more complementary materials on any other subjects, please contact me. I can be reached at the following address. mike@thestrengthsfoundation.org