Objects in motion - 04 Newton's Laws of Motion

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A look at Newton's three Laws of Motion for Year 10 Science students at Saint Ignatius College Geelong.

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Objects in motion - 04 Newton's Laws of Motion

  1. 1. OBJECTS IN MOTION. 04. Newton’s Laws of Motion. Ian Anderson Saint Ignatius College Geelong
  2. 2. NEWTON’S FIRST LAW OF MOTION. Why is the bowl of fruit stationary on the table? Why doesn’t it slide off or float away? Source: http://absorbant.rssing.com/chan- 1377193/all_p47.html
  3. 3. NEWTON’S FIRST LAW OF MOTION. Why do we wear seatbelts when travelling in a car? What would happen if we didn’t and the car braked suddenly? Source: https://www.boundless.com/physics/the-laws-of- motion/newton-s-laws/
  4. 4. NEWTON’S FIRST LAW OF MOTION. “Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line unless it is compelled to change this state by forces acting on it.” Or in plain speak … An object will keep doing what its already doing until a force acts on it. “The Law of Inertia”.
  5. 5. NEWTON’S FIRST LAW OF MOTION. Do you remember what a force is? Source: http://www.fdwallpapers.com/desktop.php?pid=1650
  6. 6. NEWTON’S FIRST LAW OF MOTION. A force is any push, pull or twist that causes an object to do any of the following:  increase its speed (accelerate).  decrease its speed (decelerate).  change its direction.  change its shape. Force is measured in Newtons (N). Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Newton
  7. 7. NEWTON’S FIRST LAW OF MOTION. Why is the bowl of fruit stationary on the table? Answer =  Because all the forces are balanced i.e. the net force = 0.  For the bowl to slide off the table we would need to push it (i.e. apply a force). Source: http://absorbant.rssing.com/chan- 1377193/all_p47.html
  8. 8. NEWTON’S FIRST LAW OF MOTION. Why do we wear seatbelts when travelling in a car? Source: https://www.boundless.com/physics/the-laws-of- motion/newton-s-laws/
  9. 9. NEWTON’S FIRST LAW OF MOTION. Why do we wear seatbelts when travelling in a car? Answer = If the car was to break suddenly, we would continue moving forward unless restrained by a seatbelt. Source: https://www.boundless.com/physics/the-laws-of- motion/newton-s-laws/
  10. 10. NEWTON’S SECOND LAW OF MOTION. “The acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force applied and inversely proportional to its mass.” Or in plain speak … The acceleration of an object will be greater, the lighter the object and the larger the net force acting on it. Source: http://tdion.edublogs.org/2009/12/15/newtons-laws/
  11. 11. NEWTON’S SECOND LAW OF MOTION. 𝐴𝑐𝑐𝑒𝑙𝑒𝑟𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 = 𝐹𝑜𝑟𝑐𝑒 𝑚𝑎𝑠𝑠 Which can be written as, 𝐹𝑜𝑟𝑐𝑒 = 𝑚𝑎𝑠𝑠 × 𝑎𝑐𝑐𝑒𝑙𝑒𝑟𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝐹𝑛𝑒𝑡 = 𝑚 × 𝑎 Source: Rickard et al. (2006)
  12. 12. MASS V WEIGHT. Is there a difference between mass and weight? Weight is the force of gravity acting on an object. 𝑊𝑒𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 = 𝑚𝑎𝑠𝑠 × 𝑔𝑟𝑎𝑣𝑖𝑡𝑦 𝑤 = 𝑚 × 𝑔 Where 𝑔 = 9.8 m/s2 (on earth).
  13. 13. MASS V WEIGHT. If Elvis’ mass is 100kg, what is his weight on Earth and on the moon?  Earth gravity = 9.8 m/s2 & Moon gravity = 1.6 m/s2 𝑤 = 𝑚 × 𝑔 On Earth 𝑤 = 100 𝑥 9.8 = 980 N. On the moon 𝑤 = 100 𝑥 1.6 = 160 N. Source: http://howthingsfly.si.edu/media/moon-scale
  14. 14. NEWTON’S THIRD LAW OF MOTION. “For every action (applied force) there will be a reaction (response force) that will be the same size as the action force and in the opposite direction to the action force.” Or in plain speak … If you push on something it will push back on you. For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. Source: Rickard et al. (2006)
  15. 15. BIBLIOGRAPHY. Rickard, G., Phillips, G., Ellis, J., Jeffery, F., & Roberson, P. (2006). Science Dimensions 4: Coursebook. Melbourne: Pearson Education Australia.
  16. 16. http://SICkScience10.wikispaces.com/

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