Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Have you become yourteen’s drug dealer?<br />What’s in yourmedicine cabinet?<br />PANEL MEMBERS<br />Kevin Cashman, Maine ...
This town hall is part of a prescription drug abuse prevention project sponsored by Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of Amer...
Abuse of Rx and OTC Medicines<br />Recent studies indicate that the abuse of prescription (Rx) and over-the-counter cough ...
Did You Know?<br /><ul><li>Every day, almost 2,500 teens abuse an Rx medication for the first time.
Next to marijuana, the most common illegal drugs teens are abusing are prescription medications.
Twenty percent of U.S. high school students say they have taken Rx drugs without consulting a doctor.
1 in 5 teens has abused Rx drugs.
1 in 3 teens say there is “nothing wrong” with abusing Rx medications “every once in a while.”</li></ul>Rx Abuse Preventio...
Maine Data: Teen Use<br />According to the Maine Integrated Youth Health Survey (MIYHS), in 2009 11.3% of Maine high schoo...
Maine Data: # of Prescriptions<br />
Local Data: Teen Use<br />In 2009 in the Cumberland Public Health District, 10.9% of high school students and 6.9% of 7th ...
Local Data: # of Prescriptions<br />Portland had the 2nd highest State increase overall in STIMULANT prescriptions (25.8)<...
30% higher than the State</li></li></ul><li>Teens’ Rx Drugs of Choice For Abuse <br />Rx Abuse Prevention Toolkit - from a...
Local Data: Medication Collection<br />In both 2009 and 2010, the City of Portland’s Public Health Division—in partnership...
Where do most teens get Prescription Drugs?<br /><ul><li> According to the Monitoring the Future study, a survey of almost...
From home, by stealing from the medicine cabinet.
From friends, by buying them or just asking for them.
From strangers, by buying them.
From illegal Internet pharmacies.</li></li></ul><li>Where do most teens get Prescription Drugs?<br />Friends and the famil...
Rx Access Points— Friends & Family Source of Concern<br />SAMHSA. (2008). Results from the 2007 National Survey on Drug Us...
Teens say that…<br />Rx Abuse Prevention Toolkit - from awareness to action<br />
Parental/Guardian Beliefs & Attitudes<br /><ul><li>Many parents aren’t aware of the dangers of Rx abuse – it’s just not on...
Rx medicines can be found in homes of family or friends, and parents don’t realize the connection between teen Rx abuse an...
Many parents do not know how to effectively talk with their teens about Rx drug abuse.  They often find out about an Rx pr...
What ‘s being done to address this epidemic in Maine?<br />Prescription Monitoring Program (OSA) <br />Goals: Help stop pr...
What can YOU do to address this epidemic in Maine? Educate. Communicate. Safeguard.<br />* Rx Abuse Warning Signs *<br />*...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Have you become your teen's drug dealer? What's in your medicine cabinet?

2,686

Published on

CADCA town hall meeting
Nov 29,2010

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,686
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
25
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • SOURCES: Center for Disease Control and Prevention and Not Worth the Risk – Maximizing Your Role as a Teen Influencer: What You Can Do To Help Prevent Teen Prescription Drug Abuse, NCPIE.While the rate of tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug abuse is down overall, more teens are turning to prescription drugs. [Refer to the statistics on the slide. Consider asking the group what surprises them most about these numbers.] These numbers paint a sobering picture. It’s a problem that needs more attention – and it must be consistently addressed at home, in schools, on the athletic field and in doctors’ offices.
  • MIYHS – State of Mainehttp://www.maine.gov/tools/whatsnew/attach.php?id=118611&amp;an=1
  • SFY2008 PMP Datahttp://maine.gov/dhhs/osa/data/pmp/files/ME_PMP_Intro_20090113.pdf
  • MIYHS – Cumberland Public Health Districthttp://www.maine.gov/tools/whatsnew/attach.php?id=118618&amp;an=1
  • Data retrieved from the Maine PMP, compiled by Toho Soma, MPH, Portland Public Health Division’s Data &amp; Research Program
  • SOURCE: Not Worth the Risk – Maximizing Your Role as a Teen Influencer: What You Can Do To Help Prevent Teen Prescription Drug Abuse, NCPIE.Drugs commonly used by teens include:Strong pain medications that are prescribed to treat moderate-to-severe pain. Teens often go in search of these to get high or feel pleasure. Some street names include: Captain Cody, China Girl, vikes, hillbilly heroin, oxy 80s, OCs, percs, demmies.Stimulants, or uppers speed up brain activity, resulting in greater alertness, attention, and energy. Teens turn to these to feel alert and be able to pull all-nighters to stay on top of coursework. Stimulants can make the heart beat faster and put the user at risk for stroke or heart attack. Some popular street names are uppers, vitamin R, Skippy.Sedatives, or downers slow down brain activity. The result is a drowsy or calming effect. Other sedatives include tranquilizers and muscle relaxants. Sedatives can reduce heart rate and the body’s response to breathing.Street names include candy, downers, tranks, barbs.Teens also abuse cough medicines and other over-the-counter medicines.
  • Information compiled by Shane Gallagher, City of Portland Public Health Division’s Environmental Health Program.
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration [SAMHSA]. (2009).National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2008. Office of Applied Studies
  • Source:COMMUNITY RX CRISIS – Balance and Perspective on Prescription Drug Abuse, NADDI.Recent Federal data indicate that over 50% of those who abuse Rx medications, obtain them for free from friends or relatives. This reality points to the need for education and outreach targeting families and friends that highlights the importance of not sharing medications and proper medication storage and disposal strategies.
  • Source:COMMUNITY RX CRISIS – Balance and Perspective on Prescription Drug Abuse, NADDI.These myths create an unrealistic picture of Rx abuse that does not take the short- and long-term effects of these drugs into account.
  • http://maine.gov/dhhs/osa/data/pmp/files/ME_PMP_Intro_20090113.pdf
  • Three mantras – educate, communicate, safeguard – are critical to protecting young people against Rx medication abuse.SOURCE: Not Worth the Risk – Maximizing Your Role as a Teen Influencer: What You Can Do To Help Prevent Teen Prescription Drug Abuse, NCPIE.It’s very important to watch for physical signs of trouble. Remember that the physical signs of abuse will be very different depending on the individual and the drug that is abused. The ones listed here are general. Seek immediate medical assistance if a teenager under your charge exhibits these signs.
  • SOURCE: Not Worth the Risk – Maximizing Your Role as a Teen Influencer: What You Can Do To Help Prevent Teen Prescription Drug Abuse, NCPIE.There are also behavioral clues…[read from slide or allow audience to read]
  • “No thanks, I’m just not into it”“Not today” “I’m not interested”
  • Office of National Drug Control Policy. Proper Disposal of Prescription Drugs. 2009. Available at: www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/publications/pdf/prescrip_disposal.pdf
  • Transcript of "Have you become your teen's drug dealer? What's in your medicine cabinet?"

    1. 1. Have you become yourteen’s drug dealer?<br />What’s in yourmedicine cabinet?<br />PANEL MEMBERS<br />Kevin Cashman, Maine Drug Enforcement Agency<br />Karen Simone, Northern New England Poison Center<br />Ronni Katz, City of Portland’s Overdose Prevention Project<br />
    2. 2. This town hall is part of a prescription drug abuse prevention project sponsored by Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA) and King Pharmaceuticals along with the City of Portland Public Health Division (HHSD) & Portland Public Schools. <br />We thank the Northern New England Poison Control and the <br />Maine Drug Enforcement Agency for participating in this town hall.<br /> <br />
    3. 3. Abuse of Rx and OTC Medicines<br />Recent studies indicate that the abuse of prescription (Rx) and over-the-counter cough medicines (OTCs) to get high is a concern—particularly among teens.<br />
    4. 4. Did You Know?<br /><ul><li>Every day, almost 2,500 teens abuse an Rx medication for the first time.
    5. 5. Next to marijuana, the most common illegal drugs teens are abusing are prescription medications.
    6. 6. Twenty percent of U.S. high school students say they have taken Rx drugs without consulting a doctor.
    7. 7. 1 in 5 teens has abused Rx drugs.
    8. 8. 1 in 3 teens say there is “nothing wrong” with abusing Rx medications “every once in a while.”</li></ul>Rx Abuse Prevention Toolkit - from awareness to action<br />
    9. 9. Maine Data: Teen Use<br />According to the Maine Integrated Youth Health Survey (MIYHS), in 2009 11.3% of Maine high school students and 6.6% of 7th and 8th graders reported using an Rx drug without a doctor’s prescription one or more times during the past 30 days.<br />
    10. 10. Maine Data: # of Prescriptions<br />
    11. 11. Local Data: Teen Use<br />In 2009 in the Cumberland Public Health District, 10.9% of high school students and 6.9% of 7th and 8th graders reported using an Rx drug without a doctor’s prescription one or more times during the past 30 days.<br />
    12. 12. Local Data: # of Prescriptions<br />Portland had the 2nd highest State increase overall in STIMULANT prescriptions (25.8)<br />Portland has the 2nd highest rate of TRANQUILIZER prescriptions in Cumberland County (86.5)<br /><ul><li>Up 5% since 2008
    13. 13. 30% higher than the State</li></li></ul><li>Teens’ Rx Drugs of Choice For Abuse <br />Rx Abuse Prevention Toolkit - from awareness to action<br />
    14. 14. Local Data: Medication Collection<br />In both 2009 and 2010, the City of Portland’s Public Health Division—in partnership with the Portland Police Department/Maine DEA—held medication collection events in Portland. Here are some data from the 2010 event:<br />
    15. 15. Where do most teens get Prescription Drugs?<br /><ul><li> According to the Monitoring the Future study, a survey of almost 50,000 teens throughout the United States, these are the ways that teens get their hands on prescription drugs, from the most popular method to the least:
    16. 16. From home, by stealing from the medicine cabinet.
    17. 17. From friends, by buying them or just asking for them.
    18. 18. From strangers, by buying them.
    19. 19. From illegal Internet pharmacies.</li></li></ul><li>Where do most teens get Prescription Drugs?<br />Friends and the family medicine cabinet are the major sources of these drugs. More than seventy percent of people who abuse prescription painkillers say they get them from family or friends.<br />
    20. 20. Rx Access Points— Friends & Family Source of Concern<br />SAMHSA. (2008). Results from the 2007 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National Findings (Office of Applied Studies, NSDUH Series: H-34, DHHS Publication No. SMA 08-4343). Rockville, MD.<br />Available at: www.oas.samhsa.gov/nsduh/2k7nsduh/2k7Results.pdf<br />Rx Abuse Prevention Toolkit - from awareness to action<br />
    21. 21. Teens say that…<br />Rx Abuse Prevention Toolkit - from awareness to action<br />
    22. 22. Parental/Guardian Beliefs & Attitudes<br /><ul><li>Many parents aren’t aware of the dangers of Rx abuse – it’s just not on their radar screen.
    23. 23. Rx medicines can be found in homes of family or friends, and parents don’t realize the connection between teen Rx abuse and easy availability.
    24. 24. Many parents do not know how to effectively talk with their teens about Rx drug abuse. They often find out about an Rx problem when it is too late.</li></ul>Rx Abuse Prevention Toolkit - from awareness to action<br />
    25. 25. What ‘s being done to address this epidemic in Maine?<br />Prescription Monitoring Program (OSA) <br />Goals: Help stop prescription drug overdoses, Educate the public on the dangers of prescription drug misuse, Ensure that those who do need prescription medications still receive them<br />Who has access to the PMP? Prescribers, Dispensers, Licensing Boards, Patients, OSA Staff, Law Enforcement (Attorney General’s office)<br />Overdose Prevention Project (Portland, Waterville, Bangor)<br />Prevent drug overdoses by providing support, advocacy, education and outreach to the community through positive collaborations and partnerships<br />Maine Drug Enforcement Agency<br />Investigate domestic, interstate and international drug offenses<br />Northern New England Poison Center<br />Provides immediate treatment advice for poison emergencies, as well as information about poisons and poison prevention, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.<br />
    26. 26. What can YOU do to address this epidemic in Maine? Educate. Communicate. Safeguard.<br />* Rx Abuse Warning Signs *<br />* Talking to Teens *<br />* Keep Track of Your Meds *<br />
    27. 27. EDUCATE<br />Watch for Physical Warning Signs<br /><ul><li>Excessive sweating, urination or thirst
    28. 28. Nausea and vomiting
    29. 29. Uncontrollable diarrhea
    30. 30. Spastic shaking
    31. 31. Drowsiness, dizziness and insomnia
    32. 32. Loss of consciousness
    33. 33. Physical dependence
    34. 34. Addiction</li></ul>Rx Abuse Prevention Toolkit - from awareness to action<br />
    35. 35. EDUCATE<br />Watch for Physical Warning Signs<br /><ul><li>Sudden mood changes, including irritability, negative attitude, personality change.
    36. 36. Extreme changes in groups of friends or hangout locations.
    37. 37. Lying or being deceitful, unaccounted time away from home/missed school days, avoiding eye contact.
    38. 38. Losing interest in personal appearance, extracurricular activities or sports.
    39. 39. Poor performance at school.
    40. 40. Borrowing money or having extra cash.
    41. 41. Visiting and even purchasing from pro-drug abuse (illegal) web sites. </li></ul>Rx Abuse Prevention Toolkit - from awareness to action<br />
    42. 42. COMMUNICATE<br />Talk to Teens about Rx Abuse<br /><ul><li>Teens learn by example. When they see mom, dad, a sibling or grandparent taking a pill – even responsibly – it doesn’t seem so bad.
    43. 43. Many teens report that their parents have the greatest influence on their drug use attitudes and decisions.
    44. 44. Kids who continue to learn about the risks of drugs at home are up to 50% less likely to use drugs than those who are not taught about these dangers. </li></ul>Rx Abuse Prevention Toolkit - from awareness to action<br />
    45. 45. COMMUNICATE<br />Talk to Teens about Rx Abuse<br /><ul><li>“Denormalize” the Behavior: While 1 in 5 teens are abusing Rx drugs, 4 in 5 are not
    46. 46. Debunk Common Myths: Rx abuse is just as dangerous as abusing other substances; it can be addictive; and it’s not OK to misuse these drugs even “once in a while.”
    47. 47. Provide Clear Guidelines: If you’re a parent, let teens know you will be disappointed if they abuse Rx medications and watch how you use medicines in front of teens.
    48. 48. Give Teens Escape Routes: Teach them how to get out of bad situations; and suggest responses they can use so they don’t feel “uncool.”</li></ul>Rx Abuse Prevention Toolkit - from awareness to action<br />
    49. 49. SAFEGUARD<br />Keep Track of Your Meds<br />Parents (and other family members) are in the best position to reduce access to Rx drugs by locking up medicines and properly disposing of expired or unused medicines.<br />Monitor all medications in the home – Rx and OTC medicines<br />Safely store medicines out of children’s reach and sight – consider locking them up<br />Get rid of old or unused medicines<br />Rx Abuse Prevention Toolkit - from awareness to action<br />
    50. 50. SAFEGUARD<br />Guidelines for Proper Disposal<br />Federal Guidelines: Refer to October 15, 2009 FDA Guidelines for Disposal by Flushing<br />Do not flush down toilet or drain unless accompanying patient information specifically instructs you to do so<br />Dispose of Rx drugs (not labeled to be flushed) through a community drug take-back. If a program is not available, dispose of medications appropriately: <br />Take medication out of its original packaging and place it into a disposable container with a lid or into a sealable bag.<br />Mix drugs with an undesirable substance (e.g., cat litter or used coffeegrounds).<br />Place sealed container with the mixture and original packaging (be sure toremove all personal information from the packaging) in the trash. <br />Office of National Drug Control Policy. Proper Disposal of Prescription Drugs. 2009. Available at: www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/publications/pdf/prescrip_disposal.pdf<br />Rx Abuse Prevention Toolkit - from awareness to action<br />
    51. 51. Local Treatment Resources<br />Day One: Maine’s leading agency dealing with teen drug and alcohol abusewww.day-one.org<br />Maine Office of Substance Abuse: Providing leadership in substance abuse prevention, intervention and treatment. www.maineosa.org<br />Mercy Recovery Center: The largest substance abuse treatment center in Maine, offering inpatient and outpatient programs for adults. www.mercyrecovery.org<br />SAMHSA’s Treatment Locator: This searchable directory of drug and alcohol treatment programs shows the location of facilities around the country that treat alcoholism, alcohol abuse and drug abuse problems. www.findtreatment.samhsa.gov<br />
    52. 52. National Resources<br />Above the Influence<br />www.abovetheinfluence.com<br />American Medicine Chest Challenge(AMCC)<br />www.americanmedicinechest.com<br />Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA)<br />www.cadca.org<br />Five Moms: Stopping Cough Medicine Abuse<br />www.fivemoms.com / www.stopmedicineabuse.org<br />National Council on Patient Information and Education (NCPIE)<br />www.talkaboutrx.org<br />National Association of Drug Diversion Investigators<br />www.naddi.org<br />National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), Rx Drugs<br />www.nida.nih.gov/drugpages/prescription.html<br />The Drug Take-Back Initiative<br />www.takebacknetwork.com<br />The Partnership at DrugFree.org<br />www.drugfree.org<br />White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP)<br />www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov<br />
    53. 53. Contact Info<br />Northern New England Poison Center<br />Karen Simone, Director - 662-7221<br />www.nnepc.org<br />Maine Drug Enforcement Agency<br />Kevin Cashman - 822-0373<br />www.maine.gov/dps/mdea<br />City of Portland Public Health Division’s Overdose Prevention Project<br />Ronni Katz – 756-8116<br />http://substanceabuse.portlandmaine.gov<br />www.facebook.com/portlandprevention<br />www.twitter.com/portprevent<br />
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×