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Tribal Leadership - Create the place where you long to belong (PPT)

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Do you hope that one day all the office politics will be replaced by a common and worthwhile cause? Do you wish you could be part of a winning team? Do you dream of working in a place where you …

Do you hope that one day all the office politics will be replaced by a common and worthwhile cause? Do you wish you could be part of a winning team? Do you dream of working in a place where you belong?

Every organisation is made up of tribes, naturally occurring groups of between 20 – 150 people. And even though each tribe is different they have one thing in common: organisational culture.

Join us to learn about Tribal Leadership, a practical model for leveraging natural groups to create organisations that thrive. Learn how you can help transform your work experience into what you want it to be by focusing on language and behaviour within a culture.


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  • Welcome to Tribal Leadership - create the place where you long to belong.
    Do you hope that one day, all the office politics will be replaced by a common and worthwhile cause? Do you wish you could be part of a winning team? Do you dream of working in a place where you long to belong?
    Today, we’re going to learn about Tribal Leadership, a practical model for leveraging natural groups to help organisations thrive.
  • Without a goal, it’s hard to score, so here’s the goal of our session complete with success criteria.
    With your help, we’ll be able to pass each criteria at the end of the session!
  • In order to create a place where we long to belong, we need to first figure out what that would look like.
    For many of us, that place would have the following attributes called the 4Cs:
    Communication: A place where I know what’s going on, where we say what we mean and mean what we say.
    Collaboration: A place where people work together, play together and win together, all towards a common goal.
    Community: A place where we care about one another and look out for each other and create opportunities together.
    Continuous Improvement: A place where we keep learning and growing
    If you find such a place appealing, raise your hand. That’s great – we’ve identified a common goal!
  • Once we identified the 4Cs, we came across “Tribal Leadership” by Dave Logan, John King and Halee Fischer-Wright.
    The title of the book set our imagination on fire as we learned about the power of one of the most fundamental and ancient concepts in human civilisation: the concept of tribes.
  • So what’s a “tribe”? The authors of Tribal Leadership define a tribe as naturally occurring groups of between 20 - 150 people. These people or tribe members know each other well enough to stop and say “Hello” should their paths cross at work.
    A small tribe consists of around 20 - 50 people whereas a tribe of tribes consists of between 50 - 150 people. The key idea is that every organisation is made up of one or more tribes, depending on how many people work there.
    What do all tribes in a single organisation have in common? They all share the same organisational culture. The idea of Tribal Leadership is to improve tribe members in order to upgrade the tribe and the tribe of tribes as a whole.
  • The concept of tribes is not new. Tribes have helped human beings survive the Ice Age, build farming communities and build cities.
    Dave Logan describes tribes are as natural to human beings just as “birds fly, fish school and people tribe”.
  • Let’s begin by baselining the stage of the tribe you’re part of today.
    Form groups of 6 – 8 people.
    Now come up with your tribe’s name and write it down on a piece of paper.
    Open up the pack on your table.
    You will be building paper cranes by following the instructions in your pack.
    Your goal is to produce as many paper cranes as you can in the given timebox.
    Each crane needs to be the same quality as the sample crane in the pack.
    During this session, you will play 3 rounds each lasting 3 or 5 minutes. (See Session Schedule for tip on slide 49 for recommended duration of timebox.)
    We’ll ding the bell to signal the start and stop of each round.
  • Ready, steady, go!
  • In your tribe, answer the following questions and note down your answers.
    Next, it’s time to debrief as one big group by sharing your answers.
    Last, but not least, it’s time to count up the scores.
    Hold your cranes up in the air.
    For each crane we all agree meets the sample crane standard, you can exchange it for a chocolate.
    We’ll note down scores as we go around each tribe.
  • So what is Tribal Leadership?
    Tribal Leadership is a model that focuses on language and behaviour within a culture.
    It helps us identify different types of behaviour in individuals.
    It provides ways to re-structure relationships to help organisations become more effective.
    Tribal Leadership is a representation of reality derived from the research by Dave and his team based on American companies.
  • The purpose of the model is to build a better organisation in which the best people want to work and make an impact.
    It’s important to remember that a model is exactly that, a model. It’s up to you to decide how accurately it reflects your own experiences and how much value you can get from applying it to your context.
  • When applied successfully, Tribal Leadership helps create:
    A more effective workplace
    Greater strategic success
    Less stress
    More fun
    The benefits can accumulate and amplify from the individual to their tribe and all the way across the tribe of the tribes of an organisation.
  • The focus of Tribal Leadership is on language, behaviour and relationship structures. Things we can observe, things we can see and hear instead of things that cannot be, such as attitudes, beliefs and cognitions.
    An interesting aside about the research is that during data gathering, the researchers also chose not to take into consideration age, gender, income, ethnicity, native language, personality type, IQ and education of participants. In my opinion, by doing so, they levelled the playing field.
  • To become a Tribal Leader, you need to be able to speak different cultural languages. As with learning a foreign language, the first thing to do is to learn the vocabulary.
  • (From slides 16-20, participants will stand up, so we can practice modelling the behaviour and language for each stage.)
    Stage 1 “Life sucks” - A person at Stage 1 feels alienated from the world around them.
    According to the research, around 2% of American professionals make up Stage 1.
    And these professionals are the kind of people who bring shotguns to work.
    Stage 1 behaviour is reminiscent of prison culture.
    The fate of people in Stage 1 are:
    1. Remain in Stage 1 tribe.
    2. Death.
    3. Upgrade to Stage 2 tribe.
  • Stage 2 “My life sucks” (a subtle yet key distinction from Stage 1) - A person at Stage 2 is constantly asking themselves “Why me?”
    Dave refers to Stage 2 as the “ghetto of corporate despair”.
    People in Stage 2 spend their time blaming others and shielding their team from management intrusions.
    This stage represents 25% of work places in America.
    It takes a quantum leap to move from Stage 1 to 2.
    Does this stage sound familiar to anyone? That’s because, according to Dave, it’s the stage Dilbert is at.
    Both Stages 1 and 2 undermine the tribe and tribe of tribes.
  • Stage 3 “I’m great” (you’re not) - A person at Stage 3 is thinking “Me! Me! Me!”
    Knowledge is power. People in Stage 3 hoard knowledge in order to retain power for themselves.
    49% of workplaces in America make up Stage 3.
    Stage 3 is reminiscent of the sense of personal satisfaction every time you have done a good job on your own and you give yourself a pat on the back.
  • Stage 4 “We’re great” (you’re not) - A person at Stage 4 has a Uz vs Them mentality. According to Dave, Stage 4 is the target stage to move your tribe towards asap.
    Individuals and tribes at Stage 4 are value-based.
    22% of workplaces in America make up Stage 4.
    There is a big canyon between Stage 3 and 4.
    Interesting fact: People in Stage 4 require a common foe to help them focus on achieving a goal.
    This behaviour reminds me of classic James Bond movies. To be a goodie, you need a baddie.
    According to Dave, people can only think in terms of one stage up from their current stage, hence the need for Stage 4 instead of going straight for Stage 5.
  • Stage 5 “We’re great, so are they” - A person at Stage 5 tries to make history.
    People in Stage 5 are driven by pure leadership, vision and inspiration. There is no other to blame, cajole or defeat.
    2% of workplaces in America make up Stage 5.
    Many graduates begin at Stage 5, sadly only to regress to earlier stages over time.
  • If we were to look at the Tribal Leadership Model as a whole, certain patterns emerge.
    People in Stages 1 and 2 actively undermine the organisation in which they work.
    People in Stage 3 and early stage 4 are egocentric, they only care about themselves.
    People in mid to late stage 4 focus on making an impact.
    People in Stage 5 are what Dave calls “History Making”. Imagine working in a tribe that operates at Stage 5. Now that’s what I call a “Dream Team”.
  • The next thing to do when learning a foreign language is to practice your listening skills.
    [Note: For handy reference for participants, hand out a copy of slide 21 “5 Stages of Tribal Leadership”, one per tribe to share. Recommended size: A4 or US Letter.]
  • The purpose for round 2 remains the same as round 1. Fold as many quality cranes as possible.
    This time pay attention to the language and behaviour of your tribe in relation to the different stages of the Tribal leadership model.
    Ready, steady, go!
  • In your tribe, answer the following questions and note down your answers.
    Next, it’s time to debrief as one big group by sharing your answers.
    Last, but not least, it’s time to count up the scores.
    Hold your cranes up in the air.
    For each crane we all agree meets the sample crane standard, you can exchange it for a chocolate.
    We’ll note down scores as we go around each tribe.
  • What else is there to learn about from observing stage language and behaviour?
  • You’ve heard people say, “It must be something in the water.” Just as fish don’t see the water they’re in, many of us don’t realise that the language we use reflects the culture in which we live and breathe.
    According to Dave, “Culture is a self-correcting system of language”. A tribal leader listens for tribe cultures and upgrades tribes through language and behaviour. It can take as little as 90 days for a tribe to upgrade to the next stage.
  • As we all know, it’s easy to talk the talk, but it’s much harder to also walk the walk.
    To accurately assess an individual’s current stage, you need to compare what they say with what they do.
    Some say actions speaker louder than words.
  • Everyone take a sheet of paper each.
    On it, write down your answers to the following three questions.
    Once you have your answers, share your answer to the first question with your tribe.
    Keep the other answers to yourself.
  • (This slide is here so that the facilitator can show this slide as participants answer the questions on the previous slide.)
  • Are you ready for round 3, our final round of paper-folding?
  • Here’s another chance to observe practice the language and behaviours of tribal leaders. Ready, steady, go!
  • In your tribe, answer the following questions and note down your answers.
    Next, it’s time to debrief as one big group by sharing your answers.
    Last, but not least, it’s time to count up the scores.
    Hold your cranes up in the air.
    For each crane we all agree meets the sample crane standard, you can exchange it for a chocolate.
    We’ll note down scores as we go around each tribe.
    Who should be the winner of this game?
    Which stage of Tribal Leadership does that answer belong to?
    Take a step back and look at the score sheet. What do you notice? That we are part of a tribe of tribes in this session. It turns out we are all winners! It’s not about one tribe winning and the other one losing. We win together, we lose together. Chocolates all around!
  • This session was first run at XP Days Benelux in 2011. During that session, a number of participants took actions to encourage Stage 5 behaviour by sharing their paper-folding skills with the entire group. Interesting statistic: no such pursuit of Stage 5 behaviour has been seen since we first ran this session!
  • To become a tribal leader, we have to live and breathe our core values and pursue a noble cause.
  • According to Wikipedia, Warren Bennis is a pioneer of the contemporary field of Leadership studies.
  • When Portia works with teams, one of the first things she does is to facilitate the creation of a Team Manifesto.
    She asks the team members to answer the question: “What does team mean to you?”
    (I)
    Then everyone individually brainstorms their answers, one per Post-It.
    Then we take turns reading them out, sticking them up.
    Next we group similar or identical words into clusters.
    Then we collectively give each cluster a heading.
    Then we divide the number of clusters by 3 and that’s the number of votes people have to decide which clusters best define their meaning of team.
    (II)
    We re-sort the cluster headings from most votes to least, choose the top 3 - 5 depending on the team and create a poster.
    (III)
    Then we place the poster in a prominent place to serve as a reminder as well as to let everyone who works with us what team means to us.
    (IV)
    Last but not least, everyone is invited to sign the poster as an expression of agreement and commitment. We share the story of how the manifesto is created and invite them to sign it, too.
  • A tribal leader has two options:
    1. Upgrade culture by bringing others with you
    2. Switch tribes
    As Tribal Leaders, we need to lead by example, so let’s look at ways we can upgrade our stage as individuals.
  • On your own / in pairs / as a tribe, answer these two questions:
    Which stage is your work tribe operating at?
    Which stage are you operating at?
  • Remember how Tribal Leadership considers words or language as the filter through which we view and experience the world around us?
    With training, experts can determine the stage of an individual or tribe within 5 minutes of conversation with their subject. Those new to Tribal Leadership can do so with similar levels of accuracy for their tribe and tribe of tribes. The exception is when a person identifies their own stage.
    A curious phenomenon occurs when it comes to identifying our own stage as tribe member. Researchers found that we tend to give ourselves a +2 stage bonus when gauging our own stage.
    Now there’s some food for thought.
  • A Tribal Leader’s key tool is learning to build and leverage triad structure.
    You know the saying, “Three’s a crowd” and that’s what a triad is and with it comes the wisdom of a knowledgeable crowd.
    The key benefit of a triad structure is co-creating a shared view that is more balanced. That’s because at least one person will remember the filter through which they’re seeing the world and help the other two people adjust their view accordingly.
    The outcome is usually is more likely for greater good than two. If it’s good enough for three, it’s usually good enough for a tribe and even a tribe of tribes.
    An example of the effectiveness of working in triads is in a peer coaching game called The Yellow Brick Road (an Agile Fairytale – www.agilefairytales.org) where we have groups of 3 players, 1 as coach, 1 as the person being coached and an observer.
    Another example is from Janet Gregory in her book on Agile Testing, where a business analyst, tester and developer work together to build great software.
  • Remember, it can take as little as 90 days to upgrade to the next stage. Taking baby steps and improving each day is the secret to successful upgrades.
    It’s also worth bearing in mind that it requires effort and concentration to maintain the stage you’re operating at.
  • Here’s a chance to experience triadic working. Change begins with you, so we’re now going to focus wholly on how to use the model to help you to help yourself upgrade to the next stage.
    Get into threes.
    On your own, review your current stage.
    Then brainstorm some concrete actions to upgrade to your next stage.
    In your groups of three, share and commit to at least one improvement action of your choice.
  • (This slide is here so that the facilitator can show this slide as participants answer the questions on the previous slide.)
  • Our last and final tip is, practice Tribal Leadership little and often.
  • In summary, Tribal Leadership is a model based on language, behaviour and relationship structures for creating change. It’s made up of 5 stages. Working in threes or triads is proven to enrich meetings and problem solving as well as help people move forward.
  • Let’s review our session goal and success criteria.
    If you agree with a criteria, raise your hand.
    (Facilitator reads out the goal and success criteria.)
  • Here are some suggestions for ways of upgrading from stage to stage.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Tribal Leadership Create the place where you long to belong With Portia Tung & Ozlem Yuce
    • 2. About Us Portia Tung Storyteller, Playmaker, Enterprise Gardener Blog: www.selfishprogramming.org | Twitter: portiatung Email: portia@portiatung.org Ozlem Yuce Change Agent, Transformation Coach Blog: www.agileatheart.com | Twitter: OzzieYuce Email: ozlem@agileatheart.com
    • 3. As Tribe Members We need to learn about Tribal Leadership So that we can help our tribes prosper. Success Criteria [ ] We know the 5 stages of Tribal Leadership [ ] We’ve identified the current stage we’re at as individuals [ ] We’ve identified at least one personal improvement action [ ] We’ve had fun!
    • 4. In Search of that Special Place Communication RabbitRabbit TigerTiger CommunityCollaboration Continuous Improvement
    • 5. Where our story begins...
    • 6. What’s a “Tribe”? Tribe Tribe of Tribes
    • 7. The Power of Tribes “Birds fly, fish school, people tribe” CitiesCities IceIce AgeAge FarmingFarming CommunitiesCommunities Ice Age image from Nasa Potato Farm from Peltonator http://shawnpt.wordpress.com
    • 8. Tribal Experiment In your tribe: Fold as many cranes as you can 3 rounds each lasting 5 minutes At the end of each round: Note down the number of cranes completed You can exchange 1 crane for 1 piece of chocolate Flock of Cranes from Cornell University http://www.cornell.edu/relief/
    • 9. Round 1
    • 10. Round 1 Debrief • What did you see? • What did you hear? • What did it feel like?
    • 11. What’s Tribal Leadership? Language RabbitRabbit TigerTiger Behaviour + Relationship Structures +
    • 12. Tribal Leadership in a Nutshell = Better Organisation With permission from (c) Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, John King & Halle Fisher-Wright
    • 13. Result! You Better performance Better service Higher rewards Have more fun Increased team performance Fewer sick days Improvement in health statistics Setting and implementing strategy becomes easier People report feeling “more alive and having fun” With permission from (c) Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, John King & Halle Fisher-Wright
    • 14. What Tribal Leadership Isn’t Cognitions Beliefs ATTITUDES With permission from (c) Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, John King & Halle Fisher-Wright What it is What it isn't
    • 15. How to Become a Tribal Leader 1. Learn the language and customs of 5 cultural stages
    • 16. Stage 1 LanguageLanguage BehaviourBehaviour life, sucks, f----, break, can’t, cut, whatever Despairing Hostility “Life sucks” With permission from (c) Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, John King & Halle Fisher-Wright
    • 17. Stage 2 LanguageLanguage BehaviourBehaviour boss, life, try, can’t, give up, quit, sucks Apathetic Victim “My life sucks” With permission from (c) Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, John King & Halle Fisher-Wright
    • 18. Stage 3 LanguageLanguage BehaviourBehaviour I, me, my, job, did, do, have, went Lone Warrior With permission from (c) Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, John King & Halle Fisher-Wright “I’m great, you’re not”
    • 19. Stage 4 LanguageLanguage BehaviourBehaviour we, our, team, do, they, have, did it, commit, value Tribal Pride With permission from (c) Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, John King & Halle Fisher-Wright “We’re great, they’re not”
    • 20. Stage 5 LanguageLanguage BehaviourBehaviour we, same team, common goal, greater good Innocent Wonderment With permission from (c) Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, John King & Halle Fisher-Wright Language heard by Portia Tung “We’re great and so are they!”
    • 21. 5 Stages of Tribal Leadership Despairing Hostility “Life sucks” Apathetic Victim “My life sucks” Lone Warrior “I’m great, you’re not” Tribal Pride “We’re great, they’re not“ Innocent Wonderment “We’re great and so are they!” Stage 1 life, sucks, f----, break, can’t, cut, whatever Stage II boss, life, try, can’t give up, quit, sucks Stage III I, me, my, job, did, do, have, went Stage IV we, our, team, do, them, have, did it, commit, value Stage V we, same team, common goal, greater good Undermining Egocentric History Making With permission from (c) Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, John King & Halle Fisher-Wright Language at Stage V heard by Portia Tung Impact
    • 22. How to Become a Tribal Leader 1. Learn the language and customs of 5 cultural stages 2. Listen for stage language and look at behaviour
    • 23. Round 2
    • 24. Round 2 Debrief • What did you see? • What did you hear? • What did it feel like?
    • 25. How to Become a Tribal Leader 1. Learn the language and customs of 5 cultural stages 2. Listen for stage language and look at behaviour
    • 26. Listen to Language Beware of the filter of language Change language to change culture Upgrade tribe through language Language RabbitRabbit TigerTiger
    • 27. Look at Behaviour Listen to what people say Compare what people say and with what they do Behaviour
    • 28. Exercise: Stage Spotting BehaviourLanguage RabbitRabbit TigerTiger Which stage is your tribe operating at? Which stage are you operating at? Identify a personal improvement action
    • 29. 5 Stages of Tribal Leadership Despairing Hostility “Life sucks” Apathetic Victim “My life sucks” Lone Warrior “I’m great, you’re not” Tribal Pride “We’re great, they’re not“ Innocent Wonderment “We’re great and so are they!” Stage 1 life, sucks, f----, break, can’t, cut, whatever Stage II boss, life, try, can’t give up, quit, sucks Stage III I, me, my, job, did, do, have, went Stage IV we, our, team, do, them, have, did it, commit, value Stage V we, same team, common goal, greater good Undermining Egocentric History Making With permission from (c) Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, John King & Halle Fisher-Wright Language at Stage V heard by Portia Tung Impact
    • 30. How to become a Tribal Leader 1. Learn the language and customs of 5 cultural stages 2. Listen for stage language and look at behaviour
    • 31. Round 3
    • 32. Round 3 Debrief • What did you see? • What did you hear? • What did it feel like?
    • 33. Tribal Leadership in Action Pictures taken by Menno van Eekelen https://www.linkedin.com/in/mennovaneekelen
    • 34. How to become a Tribal Leader 1. Learn the language and customs of 5 cultural stages 2. Listen for stage language and look at behaviour 3. Focus on core values and a noble cause
    • 35. “A leader’s behaviour is shaped by unwavering commitment to personal and tribal values” Warren Bennis
    • 36. Tribe Core Values Exercise Create your own team manifesto: http://www.selfishprogramming.com/2009/04/14/the-team-manifesto-part-1/ http://www.selfishprogramming.com/2009/04/15/the-team-manifesto-part-2/ 1 II III IV II
    • 37. How to become a Tribal Leader 1. Learn the language and customs of 5 cultural stages 2. Listen for stage language and look at behaviour 3. Focus on core values and a noble cause 4. Move yourself forward and make Stage 4 your operating centre
    • 38. Exercise: Real Life Stage Spotting BehaviourLanguage RabbitRabbit TigerTiger Which stage is your work tribe operating at? Which stage are you operating at?
    • 39. Gauging Our Own Stage + 2 stage BONUS Yo u Tribe Tribe of Tribes Trib e
    • 40. The Power of 3 You Triad Dyad
    • 41. Top Tips for a Tribal Leader 1. Make the triad your smallest unit for meetings 2. Practice listening out for the 5 stages in conversations 3. Practice speaking at all 5 stages 4. Establish a peer coaching circle with those speaking at your current stage and + 1 stage up 5. Review and upgrade your stage regularly
    • 42. You Personal Upgrade 1.Review and confirm your current stage 2. Brainstorm concrete actions to upgrade yourself to the next stage 3. Share and commit to actions of your choice In triads:
    • 43. 5 Stages of Tribal Leadership Despairing Hostility “Life sucks” Apathetic Victim “My life sucks” Lone Warrior “I’m great, you’re not” Tribal Pride “We’re great, they’re not“ Innocent Wonderment “We’re great and so are they!” Stage 1 life, sucks, f----, break, can’t, cut, whatever Stage II boss, life, try, can’t give up, quit, sucks Stage III I, me, my, job, did, do, have, went Stage IV we, our, team, do, them, have, did it, commit, value Stage V we, same team, common goal, greater good Undermining Egocentric History Making With permission from (c) Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, John King & Halle Fisher-Wright Language at Stage V heard by Portia Tung Impact
    • 44. How to become a Tribal Leader 1. Learn the language and customs of 5 cultural stages 2. Listen for stage language and look at behaviour 3. Focus on core values and a noble cause 4. Move yourself forward and make Stage 4 your operating centre 5. Practice Tribal Leadership little and often
    • 45. Summary = Better Organisation With permission from (c) Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, John King & Halle Fisher-Wright
    • 46. Read “Tribal Leadership” by Dave Logan, John King & Halee Fisher-Wright http://www.triballeadership.net Slideshare: Search for “Portia Tung” Play Create your own team manifesto: http://www.selfishprogramming.com/2009/04/14/the-team-manifesto- part-1/ The Yellow Brick Road - Agile Adoption Through Peer Coaching: http://www.agilefairytales.org Do Culture Meter Survey: http://www.triballeadership.net/culture-meter Dave Logan’s talk on: http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/david_logan_on_tribal_leadership.html
    • 47. As Tribe Members We need to learn about Tribal Leadership So that we can help our tribes prosper. Success Criteria [ ] We know the 5 stages of Tribal Leadership [ ] We’ve identified the current stage we’re at as individuals [ ] We’ve identified at least one personal improvement action [ ] We’ve had fun!
    • 48. Thanks for playing! Portia Tung Storyteller, Playmaker, Enterprise Gardener Blog: www.selfishprogramming.org | Twitter: portiatung Email: portia@portiatung.org Ozlem Yuce Change Agent, Transformation Coach Blog: www.agileatheart.com | Twitter: OzzieYuce Email: ozlem@agileatheart.com
    • 49. SessionSchedule 00.00 - 00.02 Opening 00.02 – 00.07 Ice breaker 00.07 - 00.10 About us 00.10 - 00.12 Session user story 00.12 - 00.15 Introduction to Tribal Leadership 00.15 - 00.18 Paper folding round 1* 00.18 - 00.23 Debrief in groups 00.23 - 00.26 Debrief as one large group 00.26 - 00.36 The Tribal Leadership model 00.36 - 00.39 Paper folding round 2* 00.39 - 00.44 Debrief in groups 00.44 - 00.47 Debrief as one large group 00.47 - 00.52 Language and behaviour 00.52 - 00.57 Stage spotting 00.57 - 00.60 Paper folding round 3* 00.60 - 00.65 Debrief in groups 00.65 - 00.68 Debrief as one large group 00.68 - 00.70 Core values and noble cause 00.70 - 00.75 Real life stage spotting 00.75 - 00.80 Gauging our own stage + Power of 3 + Top Tips 00.80 - 00.85 Personal upgrade 00.85 - 00.90 Session wrapup * Paper Folding Rounds Depending on the origami experience of participants, each folding round lasts between 3 – 5 minutes. Too short a timebox may make the folding impossible and participants lose interest in the session. Too long a timebox and participants may find the exercise too easy and get bored.
    • 50. Appendix Ways to upgrade one stage at a time
    • 51. Stage 1 >> Stage 2 Behaviours 1. Go where the action is - lunch with co-workers, attend social functions, go to meetings 2. See how the rest of the world works 3. Stop hanging out with those who use Stage 1 language Success Criteria ✓Be specific about what sucks ✓Compares others abilities, social advantages and interpersonal connections with their own ✓Cuts ties from those who use Stage 1 language Despairing Hostility “Life sucks” Stage 1 Life, sucks, f----, break, can’t, cut, whatever With permission from (c) Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, John King & Halle Fisher-Wright
    • 52. Stage 2 >> Stage 3 Apathetic Victim “My life sucks” Stage II Boss, life, try, can’t give up, quit, sucks Behaviours 1. Make one friend, then another then another 2. Establish relationships with those skilled at using Stage 3 language 3. Become aware of the impact of their work 4. Take on work that can be completed in a short period of time Success Criteria ✓Replace “My life sucks” language with “I’m great” ✓Compares themselves with co-workers using disparaging language With permission from (c) Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, John King & Halle Fisher-Wright
    • 53. Stage 3 >> Stage 4 Lone Warrior “I’m great you’re not” Stage III I, me, my, job, did, do, have, went Behaviours 1. Form triads through introductions 2.Work on projects bigger than they can accomplish on their own 3. Recognise their success to date is their personal achievement then emphasise the next stage will require a totally different style 4. Meet role models of Stage 4 language 5.Is transparent whenever possible Success Criteria ✓Substitutes “I’m great” language with “We’re great” ✓Actively leverage triads, extending network from a few dozen to a few hundred ✓Works less, yet gets more done With permission from (c) Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, John King & Halle Fisher-Wright
    • 54. Stage 4 >> Stage 5 Tribal Pride “We’re great, they’re not” Stage IV We, our, team, do, them, have, did it, commit, value Behaviours1. Triads are based on shared values, advantages and opportunity 2. Invests time in discovering the tribe’s core values, noble cause, outcomes, assets and acceptable behaviours 3. Takes advantage of market conditions to make history or create the necessary conditions 4. Recruit others to tribe who share the tribe’s values 5. Encourages tribe members to solve problems rather than solving them as tribal leader 6. Hold regular sessions to identify improvement areas and implement improvements Success Criteria ✓Uses “Life is great” language instead of “We’re great” ✓Seeks out more challenging projects ✓Makes decisions based on tribe values and noble cause ✓Embodies tribe’s values and strategy With permission from (c) Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, John King & Halle Fisher-Wright

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