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NOKIA Detailed Scoring                                                                                Chemicals  Precautio...
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SONY ERICSSON Detailed Scoring                                                                                    Chemical...
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PHILIPS Detailed Scoring                                                                                          Chemical...
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HP Detailed Scoring                                                                                     Chemicals  Precaut...
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Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies
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Green Electronics Report 2010

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Ranking tables oct_2010-all_companies

  1. 1. 5 6 4 •PHILIPS R •ACE •SHARP •HP 7 IT SU •A PP LE • S A M S U N G 3 •FUJ • MO TO RO LA •SO T NOV O •PANASONIC NY •NO 8 2 SOF •L E •SONY ER ICS KIA RO E 9 1 •M IC •LG •DELL S WH O N DO BE O W 10 0 EN F IL INT SH IBA T IR L •N GR O G ST -- • TO GUIDE TO EE O N? + GREENER ELECTRONICS VERSION 16 greenpeace.org/electronics This Guide ranks leading mobile phone, game console, TV and PC manufacturers on their global policies and practice on eliminating harmful chemicals, taking responsibility for their products OCTOBER 2010 once they are discarded by consumers, and their impact on the climate. Companies are ranked on information that is publicly available and clarifications and communications with the companies. greenpeace.org/electronics NOKIA Ranking = 7.5/10Nokia stays in 1st place with the same score of 7.5.Overall, Nokia does best on the toxic chemicals criteria, followed by energy, and does least well on e-waste issues. Nokia scores very well on toxic chemical issues; all itsnew models have been free of PVC since the end of 2005, and all new models of mobile phones and accessories launched in 2010 are on track to be free of brominatedcompounds, chlorinated flame retardants and antimony trioxide, therefore achieving its goal to phase out these substances. However, despite Nokia’s support for furtherrestrictions for chlorinated and brominated substances in legislation, it fails to score for its position on the RoHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances in electronics)Directive, as it does not openly support restrictions on at least PVC vinyl plastic, chlorinated flame retardants (CFRs) and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in the next3-5 years i.e. in RoHS 2.0.Nokia scores maximum points for its comprehensive voluntary take-back programme, which spans 85 countries providing almost 5,000 collection points for end-of-lifemobile phones. It also scores top marks for the information it provides to customers on what to do with their discarded products. However, its recycling rate of 3 to 5 percentis very poor; more information is needed on how Nokia calculates these figures; it also needs to start using recycled plastics beyond just for packaging.Nokia is one of the top scorers on the energy criteria. Nokia scores points for sourcing 25 percent of its total energy needs from renewable sources in 2007 and has atarget to increase its use of renewable energy to 50 percent by 2010. Top marks (doubled) are given for product energy efficiency as all but one of its mobile phone chargersexceed the Energy Star requirements by between 30 and 90 percent. It also scores full marks for committing to reduce its own absolute CO2 emissions by a minimum of10 percent in 2009 and 18 percent in 2010, from a baseline year of 2006. Nokia provides a third party verification certificate for its disclosed CO2 emissions and it scoresa point for its CEO’s statement in support of 30 percent cuts in greenhouse gas emissions in industrialised countries by 2020. NOKIA Overall Score BAD (0) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) Precautionary Principle and support for revision of RoHS Directive. Chemicals Management Timeline for PVC & BFR phaseout Timeline for additional substances phaseout PVC-free and/or BFR-free models (companies score double on this criterion) Individual producer responsibility Voluntary take-back Information to individual customers Amounts recycled Use of recycled plastic content Global GHG emissions reduction support Carbon Footprint disclosure Own GHG emissions reduction commitment Amounts of renewable energy used Energy efficiency of new models (companies score double on this criterion)
  2. 2. NOKIA Detailed Scoring Chemicals Precautionary Principle PVC-free and/or Chemicals Timeline for Timeline for additional and support for revision of BFR-free models RoHS Directive. Management PVC & BFR phaseout substances phaseout (double points) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) GOOD (3+) GOOD (3+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+)Nokia’s definition of the Nokia has already phased out Nokia states that all new mobile Nokia has banned the use of Nokia gets maximum points asprecautionary principle supports some harmful chemicals and phones and accessories to be beryllium oxide since 2004 and it has achieved its goal to phasetaking voluntary steps to identified future substances for launched during 2010 are on it is working to restrict beryllium out brominated compounds,eliminate potential hazardous elimination. More information. track to become fully free of and its compounds in the near chlorinated flame retardantssubstances despite lack of New version (2010) of Nokia’s bromine, chlorine and antimony future with the exemption of use and antimony trioxide; Nokiafull scientific certainty. More substance list. trioxide. More information. as gold dopant. The intentional eliminated remaining uses ofinformation. Nokia states that Nokia eliminated remaining addition of 8 types of phthalates PVC in 2006. Today a total of 33it supports a methodology for uses of PVC in 2006. See PVC is also banned in new products. new Nokia products are free fromfurther restrictions in RoHS, elimination case study. More information. these substances; all new modelswhere restriction criteria are More information. All products from 2010 will of mobile phones and accessoriesbased on potential risk in the Nokia’s approach. be free of antimony trioxide. launched in 2010 are on track tofull product life cycle. Nokia only However, there is no target be free of these substances.scores one point as although to phase out other antimony More information.it supports further restrictions compounds. Eco-declarations provided forfor chlorinated and brominated More information. all Nokia products.substances it does not openly Product details.support restrictions on at leastPVC, CFRs and BFRs in the next3-5 years in RoHS 2.0. E-Waste Provides info for Use of recycled plastic Provides voluntary Reports on amount of Support for Individual individual customers on content in products - and take-back where e-waste collected and Producer Responsibility take-back in all countries timelines for increasing no EPR laws exist recycled where products are sold contentPARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) GOOD (3+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) BAD (0)Nokia has consistently supported Take-back is offered in 85 The information provided is very Nokia collected 373 tonnes of Nokia is still actively researchingand lobbied for IPR. Its current countries, including in Africa and good, with addresses, phone e-waste in 2009 including 4.7 the use of recycled plastics,commitment to IPR is unclear Latin America, with almost 5000 numbers and directions to Nokia million mobile phones, compared which are currently used only inand needs to be updated to Nokia collection points globally, Care Centres and updates about to 316 tonnes in 2008. See p 90 packaging. It’s about time Nokiamaintain these points. It should see p 74. the development of new take- Sustainability Report. started using recycled plasticsclarify that support for IPR More information here and back programmes, most recently Nokia reports on its collection and in its mobile phones, as itsmeans full internalisation and here. Although Nokia has a those launched in 10 Middle recycling achievements in China, competitors are doing.transparent feedback of its programme in Argentina this isn’t Eastern countries and 11 African Finland, North America, Chile & More information.products real end-of-life costs. listed on its global website. countries. More information. Peru and Malaysia.It also needs to explore options More information. More information.for operationalising IPR and to Take-back points.lobby for IPR, inter alia to ensurethe revised EU WEEE legislationsets clearer requirements(enforcement criteria) for theimplementation of IPR byenforcing differentiated financingfor own-brand real end-of-lifecosts. More information.See also p.98 of SustainabilityReport 2009. Energy Support for global Company Commitment to Amount of Energy efficiency of mandatory reduction of carbon footprint reduce own direct renewable energy New Models GHG emissions disclosure GHG emissions used (double points) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+)Nokia has signed the Bali Nokia reports on its 2009 GHG Nokia is committed to reducing In 2009 35% of Nokia’s electricity All Nokia’s new models ofCommuniqué and its CEO states emissions as 227,100 tonnes CO2 emissions by a minimum of use was provided by renewable chargers meet or exceed thethat ‘By working together even compared to 244,700 tonnes in 10% in 2009 and 18% in 2010, energy, compared to 26% in 2008. EPA’s Energy Star requirements.the goal of achieving 30% cuts in 2008 in its Sustainability Report, from a baseline year of 2006. Most of this is made up of RES-E All except one of the currentlyCO2 emissions from 1990 levels p121, 125 & 126. Independent Nokia is to ensure that its key Guarantee of Origin certificates available chargers exceed thein industrialized countries by assurance report p.134 – 137, suppliers set energy efficiency in Europe and Greenpower requirements in no load mode by2020 is possible’. For full marks, refers to Ecofys verification of and CO2 emission reduction certificates in Australia. See between 30 and 90%.Nokia needs to call for global GHG 2008 GHG data. In future, Nokia targets. More information. Sustainability Report, p More information and here.emissions to peak by 2015. needs to provide verification of its 122 & 129. Nokia’s target forMore information. 2009 GHG emissions according to renewable electricity is to increaseFor full marks, Nokia needs to call the GHG protocol. its use to cover 50% of its totalfor global GHG emissions to peak More information. needs in 2010. See p.49 here.by 2015. Nokia has published a Although Nokia provides details verification statement of its of the various renewable energy 2008 data. certificates that it purchases, it Nokia provides a life cycle remains on two points because it analysis of a typical Nokia fails to address concerns about device. Also see p 120 additionality and to provide more Sustainability Report. information about the EU RECs it is buying.
  3. 3. 5 6 4 •PHILIPS R •ACE •SHARP •HP 7 IT SU •A PP LE • S A M S U N G 3 •FUJ • MO TO RO LA •SO T NOV O •PANASONIC NY •NO 8 2 SOF •L E •SONY ER ICS KIA RO E 9 1 •M IC •LG •DELL S WH O N DO BE O W 10 0 EN F IL INT SH IBA T IR L •N GR O G ST -- • TO GUIDE TO EE O N? + GREENER ELECTRONICS VERSION 16 greenpeace.org/electronics This Guide ranks leading mobile phone, game console, TV and PC manufacturers on their global policies and practice on eliminating harmful chemicals, taking responsibility for their products OCTOBER 2010 once they are discarded by consumers, and their impact on the climate. Companies are ranked on information that is publicly available and clarifications and communications with the companies. greenpeace.org/electronics SONY ERICSSON Ranking = 6.9/10Sony Ericsson remains in 2nd place, with the same score of 6.9. It is the best performer on the toxic chemicals criteria of all the ranked brands, being the first to scorefull marks on all chemicals criteria. It also does well on energy.All Sony Ericsson products are already free from PVC vinyl plastic and brominated flame retardants (BFRs), with the exception of a few components that are still beingphased out. Sony Ericsson has already met the challenge of the new criterion on chemicals by banning antimony, beryllium and phthalates from new models launchedsince January 2008. Moreover, Sony Ericsson is proactively lobbying in the EU for the revision of the RoHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances in electronics)Directive to adopt a 3 to 5 year timeline for further restrictions on organo-chlorine and bromine substances.It is weakest on waste and recycling issues, scoring nothing on use of recycled plastic. It scores a point for reporting that, in 2008, around 5 percent of its mobilephones (based on sales volume) were collected and recycled through European recycling schemes; figures are also given for programmes in the US, Australia andCanada. Sony Ericsson scores points on its information to consumers about its take-back programme. For more points on e-waste, it needs to continue to increase itslobbying for Individual Producer Responsibility, extend its take-back and recycling programmes, and use recycled plastic across all its products – not just a few models.On energy, Sony Ericsson scores points for committing to reduce absolute greenhouse gas emissions from its internal activities by 20 percent by 2015 (2008 baseline)and reports that 30 percent of its electricity use globally comes from renewable sources, although it needs to address concerns about the additionality of its renewableenergy purchases by clarifying if this is in addition to RE sourced via the Swedish grid. Sony Ericsson has signed the Copenhagen Communiqué, which calls for globalemissions to peak and begin to decline rapidly within the next decade; this scenario will require a reduction of 50 to 85 percent by 2050. It also states that developedcountries need to take on immediate and deep emission reduction commitments that are much higher than the global average, but provides no concrete numbers.All of its products meet and exceed the Energy Star standard. It reports CO2 emissions from its own manufacturing and product transportation, but fails to have theseemissions verified by a third party. SONY ERICSSON Overall Score BAD (0) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) Precautionary Principle and support for revision of RoHS Directive. Chemicals Management Timeline for PVC & BFR phaseout Timeline for additional substances phaseout PVC-free and/or BFR-free models (companies score double on this criterion) Individual producer responsibility Voluntary take-back Information to individual customers Amounts recycled Use of recycled plastic content Global GHG emissions reduction support Carbon Footprint disclosure Own GHG emissions reduction commitment Amounts of renewable energy used Energy efficiency of new models (companies score double on this criterion)
  4. 4. SONY ERICSSON Detailed Scoring Chemicals Precautionary Principle PVC-free and/or Chemicals Timeline for Timeline for additional and support for revision of BFR-free models RoHS Directive. Management PVC & BFR phaseout substances phaseout (double points) GOOD (3+) GOOD (3+) GOOD (3+) GOOD (3+) GOOD (3+)Sony Ericsson supports the Sony Ericsson is ahead of many Since 2007 all SE products have All new SE products are now SE scores maximum pointsPrecautionary Principle as defined companies by already eliminating been PVC free and in 2009 all beryllium free and phthalate (doubled) on this criterion.by the Rio Declaration and is substances from its new products charger cables except one legacy free. Antimony is also banned All SE products are PVC-free,implementing it. It also states that that others have only identified for charger, became completely free apart from two minor remaining with the exception of cables init supports the inclusion of BFRs future action. More information. of PVC. All models placed on the applications where antimony is early models of chargers. Sinceand PVC in the revision of the RoHS SE’s pdf List of Banned & market after 1 January 2008 used; alternatives have been January 2008, all new SE modelsDirective, together with a relevant Restricted Substances. are BFR free in circuit boards, developed for moisture protection are BFR-free with the exception ofexemption process as well as an casings and cables, older models and antimony is being phased a few components whose phaseimproved methodology for further may still contain BFRs in circuit out, but the use of antimony in out is on-going. At present, newsubstance restrictions. More boards and substrates. varistors has been exempted Sony Ericsson products are 99.9%information and here. Evidence More information. from the phase out plan until free from all halogenated flameof Sony Ericsson’s position and Banned & Restricted replacement materials have been retardant. More information.lobbying on RoHS 2.0. Substances. identified. More information. Environmental productMore information. SE stated at a See also p 12-13 There are also a few exemptions declarations for phones andChemsec conference held at the EU Sustainability Report 2009. for products placed on the market mobile broadband.Parliament, attended by Greenpeace, before 1 January 2008.that it supports a 3-5 year timeline More information.for further restrictions on organo-chlorine and bromine substances. E-Waste Provides info for Use of recycled plastic Provides voluntary Reports on amount of Support for Individual individual customers on content in products - and take-back where e-waste collected and Producer Responsibility take-back in all countries timelines for increasing no EPR laws exist recycled where products are sold content PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) BAD (0)Sony Ericsson has launched an Sony Ericsson has initiated its Sony Ericsson intends to provide Sony Ericsson reports that Sony Ericsson’s new ‘GreenHeart’individual product ’environmental new ‘environmental warranty’ information to customers in all 770,000 mobile phones were pioneer phones use a minimumwarranty’ as part of its commitment programme that includes take- the countries in which it operates. recycled through its system in of 50% recycled plastics. Theto Individual Producer Responsibility, back and recycling in Taiwan, More information. 2009. See p 10 Sustainability MH300 Green Heart ™ headsetby which it commits to recycle its China, Thailand, Singapore, Sony Ericsson provides links from Report 2009. Sony Ericsson includes 100% recycled plasticsproducts in an environmentally sound Malaysia, Philippines, New its ‘support’ page to customers estimates that in 2008 around in most plastic parts.way when any SE product is taken Zealand, India, Australia, Israel, in Taiwan, China, Thailand, 5% of SE phones (based on More information.to any designated collection point USA and Canada. Sony Ericsson Singapore, Malaysia, Philippines, sales volume) have been Sony Ericsson is looking to useglobally, regardless of where the intended to complete this rollout by New Zealand, India, Australia, collected and recycled through post consumer recycled plasticsproduct was originally purchased. 2009 in all the countries in which Israel, USA, Canada and Europe. European recycling schemes. further in its products. To scoreMore information. SE also states it operates, however, customers Customers in other countries are This figure is estimated based points, SE needs to use recycledthat is supports legislation and in Central and South America, informed that SE take-back is on the quantities of categories plastics across all its productsparticipates in the process of putting Africa and the Middle East, as well coming soon. More information. and products recorded by some and report the amount of recycledlegislation in place. However, it needs as Russia, Turkey, Ukraine and European countries. Figures are plastic sourced as a % of allto clarify that its understanding and several South East Asian countries also given for programmes in the plastics used. More information.commitment to IPR means supporting are informed that take-back is US, Australia and Canada, but itfull internalisation and transparent ‘coming soon’. More information is not clear whether the figuresfeedback of its products real end-of- and here. given represent Sony Ericssonlife costs, ie through differentiated phones or overall totals. Hundredsfinancing that accounts for each of thousands of obsolete mobilebrand separately, independent of phones have been collected sincewhether that is via its own take-back the start of SE’s own servicesystem or participation in other operations. More information.systems. Also p.14 of 2008Sustainability Report. Energy Support for global Company Commitment to Amount of Energy efficiency of mandatory reduction of carbon footprint reduce own direct renewable energy New Models GHG emissions disclosure GHG emissions used (double points) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+)Sony Ericsson signed up in Sony Ericsson reports its total Sony Ericsson has absolute targets From 2008 all Sony Ericsson sites All new models after 2005 meetsupport of the Bali Communiqué, GHG emissions as 43,160,209 kg to reduce its total GHG emissions. in Sweden purchase renewable the requirements of Energy Star,the Poznań Communiqué and CO2, reduced from 57,390,998 in By 2015 it aims to: energy (wind, solar and hydro), and “…67% are better than themost recently the Copenhagen 2008, using the GHG Protocol to - reduce emissions from the full making up about 40% of the total EU CoC power requirements. TheCommuniqué, which calls for global calculate its carbon footprint. See life cycle of its products by 15%; electricity used at all Sony Ericsson standby power is not more thanemissions to peak and begin to p 8 Sustainability Report 2009. - reduce emissions from its internal sites. More information. Sony 0.1 W for all new charger modelsdecline rapidly within the next For more points Sony Ericsson activities by 20%. Both targets are Ericsson states that over 30% of after 2005.” More information.decade; this scenario will require needs to provide evidence of based on 2008 levels. all electricity purchased globally Also p.10 2008 Sustainabilitya reduction of 50-85% by 2050. It external verification. More information here and here. has been certified by the Swedish Report .also states that developed countries More information. Society for Nature Conservation.need to take on immediate However, although this is newand deep emission reduction information the question ofcommitments that are much additionality of its renewablehigher than the global average, but energy purchases is not clarifiedprovides no concrete numbers. ie. is this in addition to RE sourcedMore information here and here. via the Swedish national grid. See p 8 Sustainability Report 2009. More information.
  5. 5. 5 6 4 •PHILIPS R •ACE •SHARP •HP 7 •FU JITSU •A PP LE • S A M S U N G 3 • MO TO RO LA •SO NOV O •PANASONIC NY •NO 8 OFT •L E ER ICS KIA 2 OS •SONY ICR •LG E S 9 1 •M •DELL WH O N DO BE O W 10 0 EN F IL INT HIB A T IR L •N OS GR O G ST -- •T GUIDE TO EE O N? + GREENER ELECTRONICS VERSION 16 greenpeace.org/electronics This Guide ranks leading mobile phone, game console, TV and PC manufacturers on their global policies and practice on eliminating harmful chemicals, taking responsibility for their products OCTOBER 2010 once they are discarded by consumers, and their impact on the climate. Companies are ranked on information that is publicly available and clarifications and communications with the companies. greenpeace.org/electronics PHILIPS Ranking = 5.5/10Philips stays in 3 place, with an increased score of 5.5, up from 5.1. Philips gains points for launching an LED TV that is free from PVC and BFRs, the first product in rdthis category to be free from these hazardous substances. Philips also has a shaver range and adapters that are PVC and BFR-free, TVs with PVC/BFR-free housings (EUmarket only so far, for nearly 2 years), as well as PVC/BFR-free Senseo and oral healthcare products and a PVC-free remote control.Philips scores well on toxic chemical issues; it has committed to eliminating PVC vinyl plastic and all brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in all its new product models by theend of 2010, and six types of phthalates and antimony by 31 December 2010. Beryllium and its compounds are already restricted; arsenic has been eliminated from TVglass and other display products from 2008. However, it fails to support the need for the RoHS 2.0 Directive (Restriction of Hazardous Substances in electronics, currentlybeing revised) to adopt an end-of-life focused methodology for adding new substances and an immediate ban on organo-chlorine and bromine compounds.Philips is weakest on e-waste and recycling, scoring zero on use of recycled plastic and for no longer reporting on recycling rates based on past sales. It also scores nopoints for voluntary take-back and recycling as it has failed to expand its take-back programme in non-OECD countries, beyond India, or extend its pilot programmes inBrazil and Argentina. Philips now claims to support Individual Producer Responsibility (IPR), is engaging in a European NGO and industry coalition in support of IPR and iscommitted to actively working towards developing IPR-based recycling systems and their supporting financial mechanisms, but needs to support full internalisation andtransparent feedback of its products real end-of-life costs.Philips is one of the top scorers on energy, and earns full marks for supporting the levels of cuts in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions needed to abate dangerous climatechange and for committing to absolute cuts in its operational carbon footprint of 25 percent by 2012 (using a baseline year of 2007). Its overall CO2 emissions dropped 10percent in 2009 compared to 2008, with emissions from manufacturing decreasing by 6 percent. It also scores points for disclosing carbon dioxide equivalent emissionsfrom its own operations, for sourcing 15 percent of all electricity used in 2009 from renewables and for reporting to the latest Energy Star standard. All TVs sold in the USand 90 percent of European models meet Energy Star v.3. PHILIPS Overall Score BAD (0) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) Precautionary Principle and support for revision of RoHS Directive. Chemicals Management Timeline for PVC & BFR phaseout Timeline for additional substances phaseout PVC-free and/or BFR-free models (companies score double on this criterion) Individual producer responsibility Voluntary take-back Information to individual customers Amounts recycled Use of recycled plastic content Global GHG emissions reduction support Carbon Footprint disclosure Own GHG emissions reduction commitment Amounts of renewable energy used Energy efficiency of new models (companies score double on this criterion)
  6. 6. PHILIPS Detailed Scoring Chemicals Precautionary Principle PVC-free and/or Chemicals Timeline for Timeline for additional and support for revision of BFR-free models RoHS Directive. Management PVC & BFR phaseout substances phaseout (double points) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) GOOD (3+) GOOD (3+) GOOD (3+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+)Philips’ definition of the Philips scores top marks for Philips had a goal to have certain Six types of phthalates and Philips is the first company toPrecautionary Principle identifies providing Product and Process models of consumer products antimony will be eliminated by introduce a PVC and BFR-freethe need to take preventative Specs, criteria for identifying free of PVC and BFRs by the end December 31 2010. Arsenic has TV; its latest PVC and BFR-freemeasures without full scientific ‘future substances’ for elimination of 2008 and aims to phase out been eliminated from TV glass products are the Econova LED-TVcertainty. More information. and examples. PVC and all BFRs by the end of and other displays from 2008. and the shaver range RQ12.However, Philips states no More information. 2010, for consumer products More information. From July 2010 new adapters forsupport for the need for RoHS 2.0 Philips Regulated Substances List, put on the market after that Beryllium and its compounds are consumer lifestyle products areto adopt a ban on organo-chlorine Version A, replaces the Restricted date. Philips has brought a PVC already restricted with a threshold also PVC and BFR-free. Previously,and bromine substances (at least and Relevant Substance and BFR-free LED-TV onto the of 1000 ppm, but include Philips put on the market TVs withPVC, CFRs and BFRs within 3 – 5 Lists in Products and reflects market. More information. exemptions. See Table 5. PVC/BFR-free housings (EU marketyears), as well as an end-of-life commitments to phase out PVC Philips needs to provide a timeline only so far), PVC/BFR-free Senseofocused methodology for adding and BFRs (see Table 9). for overcoming the exemptions on and oral healthcare products and afuture substance restrictions. Restricted substances in beryllium and to clarify why other PVC-free remote control.Philips statement on RoHS Processes list. types of phthalates (beyond the More information.Recast. More information. Framework document. six specified) are not scheduled News release announcing for elimination. Econova TV. Product leaflet. E-Waste Provides info for Use of recycled plastic Provides voluntary Reports on amount of Support for Individual individual customers on content in products - and take-back where e-waste collected and Producer Responsibility take-back in all countries timelines for increasing no EPR laws exist recycled where products are sold contentPARTIALLY GOOD (2+) BAD (0) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) BAD (0) BAD (0)Philips supports the principle of It is Philips’ intention to help Philips provides general advice to Philips aims to double the Philips introduced a vacuumIndividual Producer Responsibility establish global collection and customers on recycling, contacts collection and recycling of its cleaner which is made with(IPR) at least as far as differentiation recycling systems. for recyclers in most of the EU end-of-life products by 2015. 50% post industrial plastics andis concerned but not as far as More information. (excluding some New Member More information. 25% bio based plastic; the useprovisions that avoid the costs falling Philips has a voluntary take-back States), and a search tool to Philips reports that in 2008 of post consumer plastics is noton others. Philips has signed the IPR programme in India encompassing locate recyclers courtesy of the the total amount of WEEE mentioned. Philips aims to doublecoalition statement and has pledged 8 cities with 27 service centres. Consumer Electronics Association recycled waste in EU countries the amount of recycled materialsto actively work towards developing More information. in the US. was 69,818 tons. It no longer used in Philips products by 2015,IPR based recycling systems Pilot projects have started in More information here, here provides details of its recycling however, this is for all materials,and their supporting financial Brazil and Argentina, and monitors and here. rate as a % of past sales. not only plastics. In addition,mechanisms. More information. can be recycled in Canada Good information for More information. as Philips does not report on itsFor full marks on IPR Philips needs and New Zealand. In the US, customers in India. existing use of recycled plasticto support full internalisation and Philips participates in the MRM it’s not clear what this targettransparent feedback of its products programme as well as MP3 player represents. More information.real end-of-life costs, to document recycling via specified retailers.its operationalising of IPR and More information.continue to lobby for IPR, inter alia byensuring that the revised EU WEEElegislation sets clearer requirements(enforcement criteria) for theimplementation of IPR. It also needsto reject Art 14.2. (continued use ofthe Visible Fee) of the EC proposalfor a revised WEEE Directive. Energy Support for global Company Commitment to Amount of Energy efficiency of mandatory reduction of carbon footprint reduce own direct renewable energy New Models GHG emissions disclosure GHG emissions used (double points) GOOD (3+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) GOOD (3+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+)Philips believes that global Philips discloses its CO2 equivalent Philips is committed to reducing In 2008, Philips doubled its All TVs sold in the US and 90%emissions should peak in 2015 emissions to be 1,920 kt in 2009 its operational carbon footprint by purchase of green electricity from of European models meet Energyand decline thereafter to achieve in its Annual 2009 Report. Some 25% by 2012, using 2007 as a 7% in 2007 to 15% currently. Star v.3. In 2008 all Philips TVa 50-80% cut in 2050. It supports of these emissions are from supply baseline. Overall CO2 emissions By 2012, the number of sites models exceeded the requirementmandatory cuts in domestic chain inbound logistics. However, dropped 10% in 2009 compared that use green electricity should for standby power consumption byemissions in industrialised Philips loses a point as its verification to 2008, with emissions from be raised to the level needed to at least 70%. More information.countries of at least 30% by 2020. is for its Sustainability performance manufacturing decreasing by 6%. achieve the 25% carbon footprint 10% of Philips current batteryMore information. as a whole and only provides limited More information. reduction target by 2012. For charger models fulfil the Energy assurance; it does not provide See Annual Report for maximum points Philips needs Star v.2 requirements. These external verification using the baseline year (see ‘Improving to increase its purchasing of models exceed the technical methodology for GHG emissions our Footprint’). renewable energy. Philips has Energy Star requirements by according to the GHG protocol. asked its suppliers to introduce 5-15%. Philips could also score more points procedures to avoid double More information. by reporting emissions from a counting of renewable energy second stage of the product supply certificates. More information. chain (scope 3). More information. Data definitions and scope. KPMG verification.
  7. 7. 5 6 4 •PHILIPS R •ACE •SHARP •HP 7 •FU JITSU •A PP LE • S A M S U N G 3 • MO TO RO LA •SO NOV O •PANASONIC NY •NO 8 OFT •L E ER ICS KIA 2 OS •SONY ICR •LG E S 9 1 •M •DELL WH O N DO BE O W 10 0 EN F IL INT HIB A T IR L •N OS GR O G ST -- •T GUIDE TO EE O N? + GREENER ELECTRONICS VERSION 16 greenpeace.org/electronics This Guide ranks leading mobile phone, game console, TV and PC manufacturers on their global policies and practice on eliminating harmful chemicals, taking responsibility for their products OCTOBER 2010 once they are discarded by consumers, and their impact on the climate. Companies are ranked on information that is publicly available and clarifications and communications with the companies. greenpeace.org/electronics HP Ranking = 5.5/10HP climbs to 4 place from 8th with an increased score of 5.5 (up from 4.9), as a result of its progress in bringing products that are free from PVC and BFRs onto the market thand a new commitment to phase out beryllium and compounds by July 2011. HP now has many PVC and BFR-free products on the market, including a desktop PC withPVC-free power supply, several series of notebooks, another desktop and two LCD monitors. It has also recently launched the first PVC free printer. To gain top marks for itshalogen-free products, HP now needs to phase out PVC and BFRs from its whole product line. HP also scores well for its support for improvements to the revised EU RoHSDirective (Restriction of Hazardous Substances in electronics); specifically, to adopt restrictions on PVC vinyl plastic and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) as a focus for therestriction of chlorine and bromine from electrical and electronic products. HP believes restrictions of PVC and BFRs in RoHS may be possible in 2015 as long as specific issuesand exemptions are addressed.HP is weakest on e-waste issues; it scores points for its support and lobby for Individual Producer Responsibility, its free ‘Consumer Buyback’ recycling programme in the USfor HP and Compaq-branded product waste, and the information that it provides to customers on what to do with their discarded products. However, its voluntary take-backprogramme, although improving, continues to be weak and is still mainly oriented towards business rather than individual customers. The company reports a reuse and recyclingrate in 2009 of 16 percent, down from 17.5 percent in 2008, although more information is needed on how this is calculated. HP also needs to prove that energy recovery(namely, waste incineration) is not part of its 16 percent recycling performance and if so, exclude it from future calculations.HP scores most of its points on energy, because it discloses externally-verified greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from its own operations and estimates the supply chain GHGemissions of 86 percent of its first-tier suppliers. It also scores points for its goal to reduce GHG emissions of operations to 20 percent below 2005 levels by 2013, and forreporting its 2009 use of renewable energy as 3.6 percent of global energy consumption with a goal to double global purchases of renewable power to 8 percent by 2012.It supports the need for global emissions of greenhouse gases to peak and decline within the next decade although it could earn more points by supporting specific targetsfor industrialised countries to cut their emissions and the need for global emissions to peak by 2015. On energy efficiency of its products, HP reports that over 90 percent ofnotebook PC platforms and 41 percent of desktop platforms meet the Energy Star 5 standards. HP Overall Score BAD (0) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) Precautionary Principle and support for revision of RoHS Directive. Chemicals Management Timeline for PVC & BFR phaseout Timeline for additional substances phaseout PVC-free and/or BFR-free models (companies score double on this criterion) Individual producer responsibility Voluntary take-back Information to individual customers Amounts recycled Use of recycled plastic content Global GHG emissions reduction support Carbon Footprint disclosure Own GHG emissions reduction commitment Amounts of renewable energy used Energy efficiency of new models (companies score double on this criterion)
  8. 8. HP Detailed Scoring Chemicals Precautionary Principle PVC-free and/or Chemicals Timeline for Timeline for additional and support for revision of BFR-free models RoHS Directive. Management PVC & BFR phaseout substances phaseout (double points)PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+)HP’s definition of the Precautionary HP scores top marks on its HP will complete its phase out of HP has identified three types of HP scores 2 points for its progressPrinciple reflects the the need chemical management. BFRs and PVC in newly introduced phthalates (DEHP, DBP and BBP) in phasing out PVC and BFRs into eliminate potentially harmful More information. PC products in 2011. to be eliminated from all HP its products, including a PVC-freechemicals even without full General Specification for the More information here and products, but this does not pertain printer. For maximum points HP willscientific certainty of harm. Environment. here. to all phthalates and there is no need to phase out PVC and BFRsMore information. HP supports In February 2009, HP informed precise date on the 2009-2015 in its whole product range. HP hasthe need for RoHS 2.0 to adopt Greenpeace that it would be substitution timeline. Antimony a desktop that is completely free ofrestrictions on PVC and BFRs as a unable to meet its original and remaining phthalates have PVC and BFRs; the Compaq 8000ffocus for the restriction of chlorine commitment to eliminate PVC and been identified for future possible Elite. More information here,and bromine from electrical and BFRs in computing products by restriction but no timeline for their here and here. Other products thatelectronic products, and believes end of 2009. elimination is given. However, HP are virtually free from PVC and BFRsrestrictions of PVC and BFRs in has a goal to remove mercury are: the Compaq 6005 Ultra SlimRoHS may be possible in 2015 from notebooks by the end of desktop, the notebook seriesas long as specific issues and 2010. More information here ProBook 53110m, 4320, 4420,exemptions are addressed. and here. 4520, and 4720 notebooks andMore information. Beryllium and compounds are the EliteBook 9440 p/w, 8440To score full points HP needs to to be phased out by 1 August p/w, 8540 p/w and 8740w,demonstrate proactive advocacy. 2011, although there are several 2540p and 2740p, the Envy 13 exemptions for beryllium copper, laptop and the Compaq LE19f see p.10. and LA22f Widescreen LCD monitors. The HP ENVY 100 e-All-in-One is the first PVC free printer. Products Eco Highlights. E-Waste Provides info for Use of recycled plastic Provides voluntary Reports on amount of Support for Individual individual customers on content in products - and take-back where e-waste collected and Producer Responsibility take-back in all countries timelines for increasing no EPR laws exist recycled where products are sold contentPARTIALLY GOOD (2+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+)HP supports and lobbies for IPR. HP offers hardware recycling HP provides information to HP’s reuse and recycling rate in In 2009 HP used 5,000 tonnesHP supports the concept of services in 46 countries or consumers in the US on voluntary 2009 was 16%, compared with of recycled content resin ine-waste legislation. In Europe, territories worldwide. A recycling take-back. More information. 17.5% in 2008. The slight reduction printer cartridges, slightly moreHewlett Packard is a founding programme has been launched in HP provides information to is explained by customers holding than 2008. The HP Deskjetmember of the European Recycling Brazil and take-back programmes individual customers in South onto products longer and reduced D2600 printer is made from 50%Platform that supports IPR. To in Australia and New Zealand have Africa, India, New Zealand, but product weight, (as the number of recycled plastic material and usesgain top marks, HP will need to been expanded. Existing consumer not in Latin America or the rest of units returned has increased). More cartridges made from at least 50%document its operationalising take-back programmes include Asia and Africa. The information information. To score more points, recycled plastic. HP exceeded itsof IPR and continue to lobby for China, Costa Rica, India, Hong Kong, provided is good and accessible. HP needs to prove energy recovery 2009 goal to triple the amountIPR, inter alia by ensuring that Canada and South Africa, although New Zealand. (aka incineration) is not part of the of recycled materials used in itsthe revised WEEE legislation sets there are major gaps in Africa and Info on a range of options 16% recycling performance figure inkjet printers by 2010 (relativeclearer requirements (enforcement South America. More information (asset recovery, donation). and if so, exclude it from future to 2007) and has set a goal tocriteria) for the implementation of here and here. HP’s consumer calculations. More information. use a cumulative 45,000 tonnesIPR ie. differentiated/ individualised take-back programme in India More information is also needed of recycled plastic in printingfinancing for own-brand real end- has 15 collection points in 9 cities. on how the 16% is calculated, products by 2011 (relative toof-life costs (eg. no longer collective HP has a free ‘Consumer specifically for the EU where 2007). More information.financing such as market share but Buyback’ recycling programme in companies currently pay for recyclinginstead more real and individualised the US for HP and Compaq-branded collectively, by current market share.financing such as return share) product waste. Otherwise, HP’s To earn more points, HP needs tofor WEEE voluntary take-back programme is provide EU figures from own brand mainly for business customers. sampling of return rate and provide Trade in and product reuse. indications of how it intends to expand this sampling in the future. Energy Support for global Company Commitment to Amount of Energy efficiency of mandatory reduction of carbon footprint reduce own direct renewable energy New Models GHG emissions disclosure GHG emissions used (double points) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) GOOD (3+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+)HP supports the IPCC HP reports GHG emissions from its HP’s goal is to reduce absolute Voluntary purchases of renewable All HP workstation platforms, overrecommendation that global GHG operations, estimates its supplier GHG emissions from HP-owned energy represented 3.6% of HPs 90% of Notebook PC platformsemissions be reduced by well GHG emissions and reports on and HP-leased facilities by 20% electricity use in 2009, in addition and 41% of desktop platformsbelow half of the emission levels in product transport. HP estimates below 2005 levels by 2013. to the renewable energy available meet the Energy Star 5 standards.2000 by the middle of this century. the supply chain GHG emissions of Between 2005 and 2008, HP by default in the power grid. In More information.More information. Most recently 86% of its first tier suppliers. More reduced the energy used in its 2008 HP set a goal to increaseHP has signed the Copenhagen information here and here. operations by over 9% towards its purchases of electricity fromCommuniqué, which calls for global In 2009, global GHG emissions the previous goal of 16% by 2010. renewable sources to 8 percent ofemissions to peak and begin to from operations were 1,951 More information. total electricity usage by 2012.decline rapidly within the next decade MT CO2-e, a decrease of 10% HP’s overall goal is to reduce the More information.(requiring a reduction of 50-85% by compared with the combined total combined energy consumption2050) and for developed countries for HP and EDS in 2008. More and associated GHG emissionsto take on immediate and deep information here, here and of HP operations and products toemission reduction commitments here. 25 percent below 2005 levels bythat are much higher than the global External verification details. 2010. In September 2009, HP metaverage, but provides no concrete this goal, over a year early. Thenumbers. Note, the disparity new goal is to reduce the energybetween the 2000 baseline in HP’s consumption and associated GHGstatement and the 1990 baseline emissions of all HP products to 40of the Copenhagen Communique. percent below 2005 levels by theMore information here and here. end of 2011. More information.
  9. 9. 5 6 4 •PHILIPS R •ACE •SHARP •HP 7 IT SU •A PP LE • S A M S U N G 3 •FUJ • MO TO RO LA •SO T NOV O •PANASONIC NY •NO 8 2 SOF •L E •SONY ER ICS KIA RO E 9 1 •M IC •LG •DELL S WH O N DO BE O W 10 0 EN F IL INT SH IBA T IR L •N GR O G ST -- • TO GUIDE TO EE O N? + GREENER ELECTRONICS VERSION 16 greenpeace.org/electronics This Guide ranks leading mobile phone, game console, TV and PC manufacturers on their global policies and practice on eliminating harmful chemicals, taking responsibility for their products OCTOBER 2010 once they are discarded by consumers, and their impact on the climate. Companies are ranked on information that is publicly available and clarifications and communications with the companies. greenpeace.org/electronics SAMSUNG Ranking = 6.3/10 – 1 = 5.3Samsung rejoins the leaders in the Guide, rising from 13th place to 5th, as a result of one of its penalty points being lifted and improvements in its score on chemicals. Itremains encumbered by one penalty point, which was first imposed in v.14 of the Guide for backtracking on its commitment to eliminate brominated flame retardants (BFRs)in new models of all products by January 2010 and PVC vinyl plastic by end of 2010. The second penalty point, served in v.15 for misleading its customers and Greenpeaceby not admitting that it would not meet its public commitment until the timeline for that commitment had passed, has been lifted.Samsung gains points on the chemicals criteria, mostly for bringing products on the market that are free from PVC and BFRs; all models of mobile phones and MP3 players are freefrom BFRs as of January 2010 and PVC from April 2010, all HDD models launched after April 2009 are free from PVC and BFRs and all models of digital cameras and camcorderslaunched after April 2010 have main PWB and cases free from BFRs and internal wires free from PVC. The housings of some TVs, and all notebooks and monitors are BFR free andsince November 2007, all new models of LCD panels are PVC-free. It regains full marks for its SEC Standard after clarifying its definition of ‘phase out date’ and it has clarified itscommitment to eliminate other toxic chemicals, like phthalates, antimony compounds and alloys and beryllium and its compounds. It continues to score poorly for its commitmentto eliminate PVC and BFRs in all new models of products; Samsung provides timelines for some product groups e.g. BFRs and PVC will be removed from new models of notebooksfrom 1 January 2012 (a year later than before), but it no longer plans to fully phase out the use of these substances in its TVs and household appliances. Although Samsung has astatement on the revision of the EU RoHS Directive (Restriction of Hazardous Substances in electronics), it does not specify the need for RoHS 2.0 to adopt a ban on organo- chlorineand bromine compounds (at least PVC, CFRs, and BFRs within 3-5 years), as well as an end-of-life focused methodology for adding future substance restrictions.Samsung scores well on e-waste; it reports recycling rates of 137 percent for TVs (based on past sales 10 years ago - the average life span - since when, Samsung’s TVsales have increased tenfold), 12 percent for PCs (based on a 7-year lifespan) and 9 percent for mobile phones (based on a 2-year lifespan). However, to score top marksSamsung needs to put a reality check on the EU figures of e-waste recycled. It also needs to extend its take-back programme to non-OECD countries. It loses a point onits use of recycled plastic, which has reduced from 16.1 percent in 2008 to 8.5 percent in 2009, (although the proportion of post-consumer plastic has increased from 0.2percent to 0.4 percent), with a goal to increase to 25 percent by 2025 and use a majority of post-consumer plastic.On energy, Samsung has committed to reduce its absolute greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, despite growth in the company’s sales; it also supports the levels of cutsrequired globally and by industrialised countries to keep dangerous climate change in check, and it provides a certificate of verification of its GHG emissions in Korea.Samsung scores top marks (doubled) on the energy efficiency of its battery chargers, most of which exceed the latest Energy Star standard. Samsung continues to scorezero for its use of renewable energy; although it now reports its use as approximately 0.23 percent globally, this is too low a rate to score; Samsung needs to boost itsinvestment in renewable energy and set a target with a timeline to increase the percentage of renewable energy it uses globally. SAMSUNG Overall Score BAD (0) PARTIALLY BAD (1+) PARTIALLY GOOD (2+) GOOD (3+) Precautionary Principle and support for revision of RoHS Directive. Chemicals Management Timeline for PVC & BFR phaseout Timeline for additional substances phaseout PVC-free and/or BFR-free models (companies score double on this criterion) Individual producer responsibility Voluntary take-back Information to individual customers Amounts recycled Use of recycled plastic content Global GHG emissions reduction support Carbon Footprint disclosure Own GHG emissions reduction commitment Amounts of renewable energy used Energy efficiency of new models (companies score double on this criterion)

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