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Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
Emergency Risk Communication
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Emergency Risk Communication

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  • Recognize that everyone here is dedicated to making businesses and organizations better prepared for the unexpected\n Recognize that the marketplace expects (and relies upon) uptime and continuation of service\n
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  • Transcript

    • 1. Expanding Capacity and Capability:Inclusion of Participatory Culture, Technology and Open Data in Crisis Management Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Emergency Risk Communications Embedment Meeting (#cdcem #smem) June 28, 2011 Atlanta, Georgia Heather Blanchard Co Founder, CrisisCommons www.crisiscommons.org heather@crisiscommons.org Twitter/Skype: @poplifegirl Notes from Heather Blanchard: https://docs.google.com/document/d/ 1Uhm5GAV60VCxaIktE8dqrA7MR6wgKw-TN17bwfX26lI/edit?hl=en_US
    • 2. Participatory Culture - Future of Societal Good• People are reporting what they see and hear• People are directing resources to real or perceived needs• People are talking about or have a general view about brand/organization and the ability to “trust” your brand/ organization• Employees can be sharing what they know/see about the company knowingly or unknowingly via their friends• Technology volunteers and the public are aggregating and mapping open related to the crisis, which could include data about your company• Government at all levels are making decisions which will affect your ability to operate
    • 3. Right Here, Right NowData at the Right Time and the Right Place
    • 4. Can’t Get There From Here• Can’t get to the data - Access, culture• Can’t use the data - Technical skill, culture• Can’t understand the data - Filtering, visualization• Can’t use data together - Data standards
    • 5. The New Deal• Common hub• Ubiquitous connection• Social & cultural adoption, new norms• Participatory, self organizing & contributing, reuse• Geolocation
    • 6. Data Everywhere. It is Here To Stay.Making Data Consumer Adoption
    • 7. Global Sensory NetworkTap The Wisdom of Your Own People
    • 8. Rainbow of Sources Justin Grimes - iMLS, 2008
    • 9. Our Story
    • 10. CrisisCamp Haiti• Columbia Call to action; global footprint• 62 events, 8 countries, 30 cities• Low barrier to entry; replicable• 2,300+ highly skilled volunteers United Kingdom• Recognized by CROs and VTCs• Focus on mapping, missing persons, language and search Canada• Surge capacity for existing projects France
    • 11. What We Learned• Disasters can create opportunities for innovation, rules relax, people are willing to be open to solutions from anywhere• Disasters galvanize participatory culture = “crisis crowd”• Disasters can benefit from existing programs with training and leadership have the best change in effectively harness the emerging crisis crowd into their existing community• Disaster response requests need to originate from the local area/field
    • 12. Potential ofTechnology Volunteers• Post-Disaster Basemap: OpenStreetMap• Remote Building Assessment: GEO-CAN• Monitoring: Big Idea with the Gulf Coast Oil Spill• Crisis Content/Trends: Japan Earthquake
    • 13. Key is Data, Not Platform• Many emergency management/civil authorities don’t have access to tools and resources or partnerships they need to harness additional capability/capacity• Sometimes if there are resources, its limited to one person• Little focus on data preparedness; process• Focus on data (and its availability) not platforms
    • 14. United Nations Office for theCoordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    • 15. What We Learned Official/Affiliated Response Sources Public Sources Existing Data Population - Boundaries - Hydrology - Hypsography - Transportation/Roads - Social CapitalBefore Crisis Community Indicators Before CrisisAfter Crisis Power - Telecommunications - Weather - Alternative Access to Internet - After Crisis Food - Fuel - Shelter - Transportation - Health Care Crisis Specific Self-Directed Public Safety Reporting - Hazard Identification - Service Disruption Identifier - Public Sentiment - Status Sharing - Resource Management Need for Data Preparedness
    • 16. Learning from Japan• Need for a data coordination role• Need for “pre positioned” open data profiles• Need for increased GIS practitioners to work along side of crisis mappers• Need to turn citizen content into GIS layers• Need for organizations affiliated with the crisis to provide data feeds (i.e. private sector, government response agencies)
    • 17. Observations• Don’t create a platform expecting people to come to you, play in an open data space• Release resources for use (i.e. data, globes, imagery)• Technology volunteers want to help, they will compass towards projects which support people in need (not institutions)• Technology volunteers do not support military or national security objectives
    • 18. Recommendations to the U.S. Congress• Inclusion of participatory communities like volunteer technology communities• Create mission assignments which provide a compass for participatory communities• Engagement in experimentation and demonstration projects outside organizational boundaries, inclusion of risk• Investment in data preparedness
    • 19. Last Thought• Future of work will have to plan for people without pre-existing engagement, location agnostic, skill and collaboration based• Coordination across the field is necessary, value can be harnessed by planning for and providing a compass to encourage efforts to productive use• Social media is a term of today, we don’t know what will be tomorrow. We do know its all about data, location and context
    • 20. Questions?
    • 21. Heather Blanchard Co Founder CrisisCommons heather@crisiscommons.org 703.593.3823 twitter/skype: poplifegirl www.facebook.com/heather.blanchard www.linkedin.com/in/hblanchaThanks!

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